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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


I think I should just suck it up and take A+ and possibly N+. All I need to learn for them are the little minutiae poo poo like the max length of SATA and the features of various outdated connection specs.

(As far as I'm concerned the max length of SATA is "Greater than any possible distance between motherboard and drive in a case.")

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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Hysterix posted:

Fortunately, I was pretty good at calculus, although I could brush up. I just am wondering if there is any reason to spend money on certs given the path I'm on.

What path are you on? What do you want/intend to do with the BS?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Ignoring your egregious fashion faux pas, if you want to be a programmer, certs won't help you very much from everything I've heard. They're mainly related to support/hardware work.

If you want to learn about computer hardware and networking stuff, reading the books for A+/N+ probably wouldn't be a bad idea, but paying for the tests is probably unnecessary.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Cisco people, how would you answer this:

What Cisco 802.1d extension stops BPDU from being transmitted out a port?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


My answer was BPDUFilter. Lammle's book says the answer is portfast.

I've been asking lots of people and nobody so far has answered portfast, and from looking around online, BPDUFilter is the answer that actually works.

I just wanted to confirm.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Oh ok, I can explain that now. It's because in a /26 you have 2 bits that get "borrowed" from the host bits to be used as network bits. the 00, 01, 10 and 11 combos are the four possible combinations for those two network bits.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Frag Viper posted:

Ok, but how do I figure out the possible combos? Thats the ONE thing driving me crazy right now and I want to learn.

This book is treating subnetting like Rosetta stone, it gives you enough information to have an idea, but it doesn't give you the vital information.

Even that how to subnet a network .pdf doesn't fully explain it. It just gives you the jist and tells you to use the "happy chart"

Well, with the 2 bits it's simple since there are only 4 possible combos.

I would probably stick with the 256-Mask=Block size way (that I posted about in the other thread) to figure out the networks, since if you really need the binary you can work backwards from there rather than trying to figure out all possible combos for 6+ bits.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Frag Viper posted:

Is it really as simple as how doomisland just said? So in this case there's only 4. Is it simply asking me to count out the number of created id's in binary and lay them out in order and add the remaining 6 zeros to complete the octet?

As in
00 =0
01 =1
10 =2
11 =3

and then
.00000000 =0
.01000000 =64
.10000000 =128
.11000000 =192

Yeah. I still think it's a rather backwards way to figure out the networks, especially if you're dealing with a /23 and get to work out all possible combos for 7 bits rather than going from a known decimal to binary if you really need it.

Inspector_666 fucked around with this message at 05:13 on Jan 23, 2013

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


MC Fruit Stripe posted:

Go even simpler.

/24 is what we deal with every day and you know there are 256 IPs available. So every number higher than that halves it. Every number lower doubles the number of hosts. Just work it from there.

So if /24 is 1 group of 256, /26 is 4 groups of 64, take out the network ID and broadcast, and you've got 1-62, 65-126, 129-190, 193-254. Those are the available IPs.

Swear to god, I don't do it any more cleverly than that. If someone came to me and said, hey stripe, I need you to carve out a /1 subnet on 1.0.0.0, how many hosts would we have available, I'd just be like, oh hey calc.exe. 256. Times two. Times two. Times two.

2^(Host bits) = Available hosts, which is probably easier if you're doing a /1

(2^(Subnet bits) = Available subnets, also!)

I think the easiest way to figure out block size is the Lammle method of 256 - Interesting octet = Block size.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


CrazyLittle posted:

Yeah, I forget why but I still use /30 (and /126) for all my point to point links. There was some argument against using a /31 but it probably hinged on compatibility with lovely customer hardware.

I thought you can't do /31, at least not with IPv4? Also are you really "wasting" IPs since you need a network address and a broadcast address anyway?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


psydude posted:

/31 is supported for Point to Point links on a lot of commercial-grade hardware.

Interesting. I assume the equipment just ignores the "requirement" for a broadcast address since it's not really necessary?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


b0ng posted:

My professor is pretty adamant that Packet Tracer will be able to provide the switch and router functions that you would need to practice with in order to study for the CCENT and the CCNA.

Packet Tracer is missing support for some commands (| is the one that jumps out for me) and also treats interface input differently than in IOS proper.

I mean, Cisco built it for people studying for the CCNA, so yes it would work for that, but I could see people getting into bad habits from it. Checking configs using "hosts" is so much easier in Packet Tracer as long as you just need to ping stuff though, so that's nice.

EDIT: Also it seems like when it tries to resolve a host if you misspell input in the console, it never actually times out and you have to "power cycle" the router instance. That's annoying as hell.

Inspector_666 fucked around with this message at 05:52 on Feb 1, 2013

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Tab8715 posted:

Isn't the CCENT the first test of the CCNA?

You can either go ICND1 (CCENT) then IDND2 which gets you the CCNA, or take it as one big test, which just ends up with you getting the CCNA and skipping the CCENT entirely.

Somebody in the thread said that they recommended taking them separately since that way, if you fail you're not out $250 and having to take the whole shebang again, which sounds like a good idea to me.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


psydude posted:

I don't know what your level of exposure is to IOS and the likes, but you'll probably want to read the book through chapter 8 (where routing starts) and then set up your lab because he has labs for each chapter and topic that you can follow along with.

Yeah, do all the hands-on labs. There are a few chapters where reading them confused me, but as soon as I fired up GNS3 and actually did it, became really easy.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


GobiasIndustries posted:

Well...poo poo. I have no excuse as to how I butchered DHCP into that.

Wait, how the gently caress does he understand DHCP if he thinks MACs are pointless?

(I think I see the problem.)

GobiasIndustries posted:

Thanks for all the replies gang. I definitely don't listen to a thing he says as he knows probably less than I do about networking (which isn't much to begin with) and likes to get angry about stuff that isn't what he already knows...makes for an awesome study partner I took CCNA classes back in HS (2004) so I kinda remember some of the stuff, but again not enough to actually speak to why he's being a dum dum yet.

The definitive answer is that without some kind of hardware addressing, you can't use layer 3 unless you want to assign a static IP to literally everything you'll ever connect to the network.

Also please have him write down how switching will work in his magical L2-less land.

Inspector_666 fucked around with this message at 19:46 on Jul 31, 2014

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Dr. Arbitrary posted:

You will need to do powers of 2 and subtracting from 256
For example, if you need to create a subnet for 95 computers in the smallest space possible, you'll need to know the smallest power of 2 that's larger than 95 (plus 2).

You are apparently in good company though because there are a ton of resources for practicing this.

The good news is that powers of 2 is really easy since every time you add 1 to the exponent, you just double the number.

(128)

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


I have no plans to take S+ right now, but for $2.99 I'd be dumb not to get it.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


chocolateTHUNDER posted:

I would say knowing the different pin counts on stuff like Floppy drive connectors, serial ports, VGA etc is helpful since they popped up a few times on my exam.

Holy poo poo, that stuff is still on there?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


rock2much posted:

The guy who does the Shrikecast CCNA vids on youtube recommends doing the whole CCNA package in one shot. I'm considering doing that.

I think the rationale behind taking just the one test is that you will hopefully be getting at least 50% ICND1 questions, which should be relatively easy.

The rationale behind taking them separately is that if you fail you're only out half the money and have a better idea of which stuff you have to study harder.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Lord Dudeguy posted:

Day 2 of my MCSA Server 2012 Boot Camp...

God, I suck at subnetting.

Just the act of doing the math, or something else? Because there are all sorts of tricks to make it easier.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Ahdinko posted:

Not knowing your full background/history, here's what I'd do if I had no certs or experience:

MCTS: Windows 7
MCSA: Server 2012
MCSE: Server Infrastructure

You'll probably struggle to do the MCSA or MCSE without relevant industry experience

Without knowing what he wants to do, there's no way to recommend any type of cert. The most general you could go would be like, Sec+ maybe, since it's a baseline req for so many government positions in the US and is vendor-neutral?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Ahdinko posted:

He says he wants to do server admin, so really the only way he can go is Linux or Windows?


Oh whoops, I missed that edited in line

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


MC Fruit Stripe posted:

Nope, one of you two is gonna need to change your avatar.

That's the new "Stupid Newbie" avatar.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Sheep posted:

Packet Tracer (the free version anyways) doesn't support everything that is theoretically covered by the CCNA, and GNS3 is finicky enough that I wouldn't try to use it as my sole practice tool, but that's just me. I'm sure there are plenty of people who have simmed their way to passing.

Packet Tracer doesn't (didn't?) support the | command, which is so dumb and annoying.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Ahdinko posted:

Its not essential for a CCNA, I didn't use | until about 3 years into my Cisco career, and I didnt know about | sec until about 4-5 years in. I also hate when I'm on a router that will do | inc but not | sec

It makes it so much easier to find into when you show run though. It's also discussed in the CCNA literature.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


KillHour posted:

Yep. I'm used to it being called CIDR and had to look it up to realize they were the same thing.

VLSM and CIDR aren't the same things, are they?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


CrazyLittle posted:

The way I understand it VLSM is how you get smaller-than "Class A/B/C" networks, and CIDR is how you're able to mix them when routing. Not like that's much of a distinction. *shrug*

I guess since I don't really do poo poo with networks outside of /24, I think of CIDR just as the notation rather than what it actually represents.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Chickenwalker posted:

Lammle's section on subnetting is overly verbose and kinda blows. He starts out teaching you bitwise calculations and then just gives up and starts substituting it with magic number stuff halfway through with no real introduction to the concept. I had to Google to find what he meant by interesting octet.

I actually found his subnetting section to be pretty intuitive once he got into the magic number stuff. I feel like subnetting as a whole it tough to explain from scratch in a non-interactive setting no matter what the method is.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair



Dealing with our clients' infrastructure does often make me want to turn into the Hulk and crush all of it into dust, so I guess that's accurate?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Dr. Arbitrary posted:

Always
Poop
Sitting on the
Toilet
Never
Double
Poop

This is by far the best one.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


m.hache posted:

I wouldn't. If you ever get caught using the dumps you'll have all certs pulled and be black listed.

How would one theoretically get caught using a test dump?

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Judge Schnoopy posted:

I probably am if only because I can't get up the courage to take it.

God, this is the exact same boat I'm in.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


crunk dork posted:

This has been my thinking too, thankfully WGU treats each ICND exam like a class so it's split. Everyone I talk to seems to think that the composite exam is the way to go for some reason and I don't understand why.

I've seen people say that if you take the composite you have the chance that it's mainly ICND1 questions, but it still doesn't seem like a great idea.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


BaseballPCHiker posted:

I just got an email from CompTIA. Apparently it's not enough to have passed the CCNA since I've gotten my Network+. They also require a $147 3 year renewal fee! What a crock of poo poo. I dont even think it's worth getting reimbursed by my employer for. Any negative consequences if I let it lapse? I mean I could still list it on my resume if need be right?

Why would CompTIA care about your CCNA? And if you have your CCNA I would say you can safely let the N+ lapse.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


If you get an IOS image for a router that supports a switch card, you can use that to gently caress with switch commands.

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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Race Realists posted:

okay see poo poo like this scares me into not wanting to take the test

Jesus loving christ why is Net+ asking about fire suppression and SCADA?

I want to get some CompTIA certs because they should be super-easy with my technical knowledge, but then they're gonna ask me the pinout of a loving floppy drive or something.

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