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Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Any ITIL Masters ITT? I'm looking at my training roadmap and it looks like I need to:

- Get Foundations Qualification
- Get 5-6 Qualifications, selected from the Lifecycle and Capability groups.
- Get Managing Across the Lifecycle
- Get ITIL Expert Level

I did some cursory Googling: it looks like I can get all of my Qualifications up through Managing Acroos the Lifecycle trained and tested through Learning Tree, but it will cost me upwards of $15k to do so, and while Learning Tree is convenient when someone else is paying for it, I've found it to be a sub-optimal training experience in the past.

If anyone has passed any or all of the above Qualifications, It would be great to get some recommendations as to training providers, etc.

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Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Nebulis01 posted:

My father is taking the PMP next month. He's worked for the last few years a Systems Architect and they are counting that as project management experience for the certification. As his job description and duties fall within what they consider acceptable

This.

As part of the application process, there's a worksheet that is basically a more granular resume, where you break down project work that you've done during the last 8 years and apply hours across the different process groups: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. There's no required allocation across the process groups. You also list references, similar to a 360 review: Boss, Customer, or direct report, which has full contact information for your referrals.

They randomly audit applications, and if they don't like the application and/or referral checks, they'll reject your application. If they find any substantial irregularities between the application and reference checks, they'll blackball you.

4500/16000 hours isn't that much: it's about 13 hours/week on average over the past 8 years. Obviously, they are trying to verify that you've got at least a modicum of experience managing projects.

EDIT: Maths!

Feral Bueller fucked around with this message at 15:34 on Dec 7, 2012

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

PMP Update:

I finally completed and submitted my application.

A couple of things that I found while going through the process that others might find helpful:

- The Experience Verification process sounds a lot more difficult than it actually is.

- You don't have to be a PM or even a lead on a project in order to record it as relevant experience. For example, if you were a QA Engineer on a Project, then you'd classify your Project Role as "Project Contributor". Even better, it's a drop-down list, so you just choose a role.

- Project Description is limited to 600 characters. Not words, characters. 4 tweets.

- in the description, I just related experience to the relevant domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Managing and Controlling, Closing).

- You don't have to have hours in each domain on every project. Using the above QA Engineer example, you may have nothing to do with Initiating or Executing, so don't worry about needing to have time against every domain on every project.

Audit Preparation:

- Contact the managers referenced in the Experience Verification section of your application. Let them know that you're applying and that work performed under their management is being submitted. Have them review the application and answer any questions they may have. Let them know that in the event of an audit, they will simply have to verify your submission. Also a good idea to let them know that audits are 100% random and not a reflection on you as an applicant.

- Make sure your resume is consistent with your application.

Don't let all of the hype surrounding the experience verification process stop you from getting your PMP: once you're actually moving through the process it's not a big deal. I didn't bother with any of the experience verification worksheets floating around: I did the work directly in the application, as you can save the application and go back to it before you submit. I can't tell you how many times over the last 5 years I've downloaded one of those worksheets, opened it up and said "screw this", and not bother applying. This time I said "screw this" and applied. A side-effect of this has been two of the managers referenced tell me how they were amazed that an actual application is so much more straightforward than they thought and how they are going to now go get their PMP. Go figure.

If anyone has a questions, feel free to PM me or ask.

Feral Bueller fucked around with this message at 19:55 on Mar 3, 2013

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

CrushedWill posted:

I'm glad to see that somebody else is doing PMP as well. I have my app basically ready, I'm just waiting for my tax refund so I can chunk down the $400 for the test.

I've already let my boss know that I will be applying in case their is an audit. I already also have my 35 contact hours verification and college degree documents in Evernote ready to go in case it happens.

Have you scheduled your exam yet? I am hoping I will be able to get a test date before 31 July as all my studying has been against the PMBOK 4th edition, testing changes to 5th edition in August from what I have read.


I'm not scheduling until all other hoops are jumped through, just because work-load has been so heavy. My instructor reviewed my test scores - Velociteach is big on data/metrics - and based on all quiz and test scores to date, he recommends no more than 4-6 weeks, so I'll sit for mine no later than 20 April.

I have no desire to deal with 4th Ed. / 5th Ed. transitions, so if I don't pass on the first try, I'm on it every 2 weeks until I do. I just want to be done with it and start plowing through ITIL: I want to have ITIL Expert by the end of the year.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

smokmnky posted:

I've been looking into this and got the go ahead from my boss to go ahead and schedule my boot camp class. Thinking that with my schedule i can't take them until June but I'd like to get a jump start. Should I go ahead and pick up that Head First book if I have little to no experience with PMP? I'm pretty sure I can meet the hour requirements but I've never thought of myself as a "project manager" even though it's pretty much all I do in my day to day job. I just don't manage anyone...

Having read both Andy Crowe's book and the Head Start book, if I was going to pick one, I'd pick Crowe's:
THe PMP Exam: How to Pass on Your First Try

When you say you have your hours, I'm assuming you mean your work experience, not classroom hours.

If you need the classroom hours and can afford it, I'd take a look at Velociteach, also run by Andy Crowe: http://www.velociteach.com/live/3-day-pmp-exam-prep/

It's $2500.00, but it's exhaustively covered from all angles. I'm 2 weeks out from the test, and feeling like all I have left to do is memorize some formulas at this point. We'll see if I'm one of the 93% that they say pass the first time: work's been crazy and I don't feel like I've gotten as much study time in as I should.

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