Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Flaky
Feb 14, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 2310 days!


Just got back from a 5 day hike in Kosciuszko National Park in Australia. Total distance walked was over 100kms, but I had to escourt a trip-mate who hosed his knees up so we pulled out halfway. Didn't get to tag Mt. Jugungle or the Sentinel, but I have been up Kozzie plenty of times.







You can see the extensive fire damage in the second pic - this was from 2001 I think, though it may have been 2003 when 300 homes were destroyed in my city. Some of the trails have been completely destroyed by emerging saplings, which are just large enough to make bush bashing almost impossible. We were walking at 200m/h for some of this walk.

Flaky fucked around with this message at 22:25 on Dec 13, 2012

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

EvilElmo
May 10, 2009


Flaky posted:

this was from 2001 I think, though it may have been 2003 when 300 homes were destroyed in my city.

A fellow Canberra goon!

Shrinking Universe
Sep 26, 2010
Muse sucks FYI

bou posted:



First time poster and Backpacking-Rookie from Germany checking in. I recently fell in love with the "Great Ocean Walk" because it seems rather easy to do and offers a lot of sights i just won't find anywhere near me. But when i make that long flight to Australia, i sure as hell want to do more than one trip. Any suggestions for more tours without having to travel across the continent would be really appreciated as any tips in general.


I've done the first 20km of this hike, from Shelley Beach to Blanket Bay/Cape Otway, as an overnight hike. Fairly undemanding. Mostly on beach and fire trail. I would love to do the entire hike. It's one of those areas that is popular with busloads of tourists but you can get a better experience by walking. It is spectacular there. One of my favourite school camps was an overnight hike there.

A lot of the campsites are shared with drive in camping so this is something to be considered, takes away from it being a true "wilderness" experience but means the amenities are a bit better and help is never too far away if something goes wrong.

As for Time Cowboy, I think Flaky may have just flagged himself as a high country guru, otherwise my suggestion would be to pick up a guide to the Australian Alps Walking Track and drop in somewhere that suits you (and is accessible). I'm not sure if there are any routes you can take back that make it a circuit at any point, but if you can arrange transport at either end, then you can walk as far as you like, bearing in mind that a lot of it is quite remote.

It's on my bucket list to do.

Wow, beginning of 2nd page, and 3 Canberra goons already...

EvilElmo
May 10, 2009


Shrinking Universe posted:

Wow, beginning of 2nd page, and 3 Canberra goons already...


I'm scared.

egyptian rat race
Jul 13, 2007

Lowtax Spine Fund 2019


Ultra Carp

Photos for the new thread!


Moanalua Valley, Oahu, HI


Mount Rogers, VA


Cold Mountain, NC


St. Mary's Wilderness, VA



Standard Imgur procedure, delete the "l" in the filename for the slightly bigger versions. I'm located in central Virginia, and I've been on several hiking and backpacking trips around the region for the past two years I've lived here.

Has anyone done all or a portion of the Presidential Traverse in New Hampshire?

Peever
Nov 14, 2004

This shit's chess, it ain't checkers! Shit. They build jails 'cause of me.

Are there any recommend iPad map apps? I live near a number of state and national parks and I would love to be able to look at all the hiking trails or plans trips from my iPad.

ZoneManagement
Sep 25, 2005
Forgive me father for I have sinned

I'm getting into hiking, myself, and in the Atlanta, GA area - Ponies is adding me to the list, but anyone looking for a companion or two can hit me up, with a little forewarning of course.

Tyger41
Oct 7, 2012


All these pictures are very inspiring. Also, like a level 10 nerd, I went and saw The Hobbit this morning at the first showing and now I really want to go find some "cliff trail" type hikes like the one where they filmed the movie, where they were on cliff edges and on ridges.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Tyger41 posted:

All these pictures are very inspiring. Also, like a level 10 nerd, I went and saw The Hobbit this morning at the first showing and now I really want to go find some "cliff trail" type hikes like the one where they filmed the movie, where they were on cliff edges and on ridges.

Two that I know of:
Angel's Landing
Kalalau

...probably some places in new zealand

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

Don't forget the Knife Edge on Katahdin!

Seagull Fiasco
Jul 25, 2011



smilehigh posted:

Please tell me more about this, thanks.

I'm moving to the UK in 3ish months and I want to do as much hiking as I possibly can.

Have you done any other UK trails/paths?

Certainly! The trail is actually quite long and runs from Amroth to St Dogmaels, always along the coast, so you can do parts of it going from town to town, or you can stay in one place and just hike different parts each day (public transport is your friend here). You're walking up and down the cliffs a lot, and you never lose sight of the sea. It's not really a hike to choose if you want to be far away from civilisation because you're always in the vicinity of settlements. However, it is really beautiful, and if you're lucky like I was you'll get to see some fuzzy baby seals hanging out in the coves. And little flocks of Welsh ponies seemingly firmly attached to the most impossible of cliffs.

It's not a difficult hike. The constant up and down can get a bit tiring with a heavy backpack, but you're not going to kill yourself. Bring walking sticks, your knees will thank you.

I walked the northernmost part (from St David's to Pwll Deri) since it was supposed to be the most beautiful and remote one. It's possible to hike it with tents, though you're only allowed to pitch them in campsites. Because the emphasis for me was on "holiday" I opted to walk between youth hostels. The path is pretty well served with accommodation and a good bus network catering specifically to hikers. The downside is it can all get kind of crowded, but if you're interested in meeting like-minded people from all walks of life it's fantastic.

I haven't done much hiking elsewhere in the UK, though I've been for day hikes in the Peak District before, an area I would highly recommend you to explore! I've also heard many good things about the Pennine Way (which I almost did before ultimately deciding for Pembrokeshire, mostly because I was born in a coastal town and felt the sea call) and the South West Coast Path. Other areas worth checking out are Snowdonia (Wales) and all of Scotland, which I sadly have no personal experience of so far.

TerminalSaint
Apr 20, 2007


Where must we go...

we who wander this Wasteland in search of our better selves?


Diver Dick posted:

Has anyone done all or a portion of the Presidential Traverse in New Hampshire?

About 10-15 years ago I did Washington. Lucked out and had a beautiful day for it. Went up the Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail and back down the Jewell Trail.




bou
Aug 3, 2006




Thank you!
Sounds like a great warm-up-tour to me and a great chance to repack before trying something more challenging.

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


Tyger41 posted:

All these pictures are very inspiring. Also, like a level 10 nerd, I went and saw The Hobbit this morning at the first showing and now I really want to go find some "cliff trail" type hikes like the one where they filmed the movie, where they were on cliff edges and on ridges.

The Sawtooth Ridge between Mount Evans and Mount Bierstadt has a couple classic routes across it with varying degrees of exposure that would fit the bill quite nicely.




The Mount Evans massif is also responsible for much of Denver's weather systems, so during the summer you can get some really dramatic storms. When I headed up in August 2011 to backpack at Abyss Lake, there was a phenomenal storm that built directly over the ridge and blasted us with grape-sized hail for the better part of 3 hours. It was especially fun being above tree line and having to take shelter under the scattered boulders since the hail was pounding with such force that it was shedding any exposed skin.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Evans is awesome. I thought the Sawtooth was a fourth class scramble, though?

Anyway, two photos from high up on Evans, summer 2003:

Clouds below:


Kids!

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


a foolish pianist posted:

Evans is awesome. I thought the Sawtooth was a fourth class scramble, though?

It can be as spicy as you want it to be, but it goes at solid Class 3 along the west side. The pictures I posted are from Abyss Lake on the eastern side of the ridge, which is a lot more dramatic looking. The route is pretty well worn and the cairns are usually pretty logical and well maintained. Here's a pretty good video of the route, complete with lovely hippie music and afternoon hail bombardment.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



That doesn't look too bad. I did Bierstadt one nice morning at the end of July 2011, and I looked at the sawtooth and thought about it for a while. I hit the Bierstadt summit by 9:30 or 10:00, so there would have been plenty of time. I was by myself, though, and didn't want to risk it.

slartibartfast
Nov 13, 2002


Tyger41 posted:

All these pictures are very inspiring. Also, like a level 10 nerd, I went and saw The Hobbit this morning at the first showing and now I really want to go find some "cliff trail" type hikes like the one where they filmed the movie, where they were on cliff edges and on ridges.

If you're near Yosemite you could hike Cloud's Rest. Just don't go right now unless you're really comfortable hiking narrow ridges in snow, ice, and wind.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I drove up to New Hampshire for a quick hike of Sandwich Dome on Saturday, up Sandwich Mountain Trail, and down Drake's Brook Trail. The weather was great, not a cloud in the sky and highs in the upper 20s. Not a lot of snow on the ground though, only a thin coating and patchy ice above 3000'. It snowed yesterday, and there's more snow expected this week. Hopefully it'll be more like winter next time I go up.


Mount Washington and the Tripyramids by EPICAC, on Flickr


Waterville Valley Ski Slopes, Franconia Ridge, The Osceolas by EPICAC, on Flickr


Drake's Brook by EPICAC, on Flickr

Miron
Dec 2, 2006


EPICAC posted:

I drove up to New Hampshire ...

I drove over to New Hampshire yesterday and hiked up Owl's Head. The total trip was 17 miles with a bushwack that saved us some distance and a couple tough stream crossings. Given the weather I wasn't expecting to meet anyone else but we came across another group just before the summit. We took the slide up and they did a bushwack straight up through the dense spruce. I'm not sure which of us made the worse choice. We joined up with them for the rest of the hike which was fun.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Miron posted:

I drove over to New Hampshire yesterday and hiked up Owl's Head. The total trip was 17 miles with a bushwack that saved us some distance and a couple tough stream crossings. Given the weather I wasn't expecting to meet anyone else but we came across another group just before the summit. We took the slide up and they did a bushwack straight up through the dense spruce. I'm not sure which of us made the worse choice. We joined up with them for the rest of the hike which was fun.

Are you working on the New Hampshire 4000 footers? Everyone my wife and I saw and talked to when we hiked Owl's Head last June were working on the list (ourselves included). I thought it was a fun hike, even if it's long and the only real views are from the slide.

Did you do the bushwhack from the Black Pond Trail? We took that route when we did it. Apparently there's a herd path that you can follow for much of the route. We lost it, and ended up trending too far west. Our descent back down to the trail was a miserable slog through thick spruce. We opted for the stream crossings on the way back.

I've read about another bushwhack that bypasses the slide that's commonly used in the winter, I wonder if that's what the other group took. Apparently both whacks are commonly used enough and easy to follow in the winter once they get packed down by snowshoes.

Miron
Dec 2, 2006


EPICAC posted:

Are you working on the New Hampshire 4000 footers? Everyone my wife and I saw and talked to when we hiked Owl's Head last June were working on the list (ourselves included). I thought it was a fun hike, even if it's long and the only real views are from the slide.

Did you do the bushwhack from the Black Pond Trail? We took that route when we did it. Apparently there's a herd path that you can follow for much of the route. We lost it, and ended up trending too far west. Our descent back down to the trail was a miserable slog through thick spruce. We opted for the stream crossings on the way back.

I've read about another bushwhack that bypasses the slide that's commonly used in the winter, I wonder if that's what the other group took. Apparently both whacks are commonly used enough and easy to follow in the winter once they get packed down by snowshoes.

My friend and I are working on the 4000 footers. The group we ran into had one guy who wanted Owl's Head for his fall list and another who is working on the 4000 footers.

We did do the bushwack from Black Pond. We were able to follow the trail for maybe a few thousand feet before it started turning too far east. At that point we just went straight at 340 magnetic. The woods were really open until the last hundred feet where the ground dropped off into a spruce thicket.

The other group told us about the herd path which is more towards the south side of the mountain and is very easy to follow once winter fully hits. They missed it this time around.

lavaca
Jun 11, 2010


I live in Seattle and do most of my hiking (and snowshoeing) in the Cascades.


Climbing up to Sahale Arm by seanexmachina, on Flickr

However, work is sending me to Miami for three months starting in January.

Although I'm familiar with the joys of hiking in hot, humid places, I've never been to Florida. So: what are some good places to hike in South Florida? What are the general precautions I should take in the Everglades/Keys? Would I be better off just taking up cycling or kayaking instead?

Xenixx
Nov 30, 2007

by T. Mascis


lavaca posted:

I live in Seattle and do most of my hiking (and snowshoeing) in the Cascades.


Climbing up to Sahale Arm by seanexmachina, on Flickr

However, work is sending me to Miami for three months starting in January.

Although I'm familiar with the joys of hiking in hot, humid places, I've never been to Florida. So: what are some good places to hike in South Florida? What are the general precautions I should take in the Everglades/Keys? Would I be better off just taking up cycling or kayaking instead?

Swamp boating is the big thing there I hear, I don't think there's much for hiking considering the territory down there. Listening with eager ears myself to hear otherwise!

BIG SAD
Oct 26, 2006

Are you trying to Garfunkel me?


There's almost no hiking in Miami. Everglades national park has a few trails, mostly designed for bikes.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


There is absolutely nothing as far as hiking goes in South Florida. It is some of the most boring terrain to hike. Pick up kayaking, especially if you are going to be in Miami. There are a lot of barrier keys offshore, and if you head south you have the Florida Keys where you can paddle from key to key.

Airboats are fun, but they're more of a tourist activity. Decent way to kill an hour once.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Agreed on kayaking being the best way to explore south florida. I kayaked on the everglades coast once - just off of Flamingo - and explored some tiny islands, and then some dolphins just came and chilled 10 feet from my kayak. Totally great way to spend a day, and the tiny islands are so neat to look around on. In that area, there's also a sorta fun half-day-hike around Snake Bight.

But also!
During winter, some of the swamps in florida dry out to surreal mudcrack-lands. I had a beautiful hike in a place called Babcock-Webb Wildlife Mgmt Area last christmas - it's kind of a hunting zone, but nobody hunts this time of year. The rangers were like "uhhh, hikes?" but I ran into a guy on a bike who told me it was beautiful. So I just kind of wandered for a while, north of the main road, following some dried mud truck pathways, and wow, there were so many mini-ecosystems and they were all pretty incredible. The whole area apparently gets like 6" standing water in the summer, but in the winter it's walkable.
It's a ways north of miami though, more up near Ft Myers. Just sayin.

Also, disclaimer, I'm speaking from like a cumulative 5 days experience outdoors-ing in FL.

stupid puma
Apr 25, 2005



While we're kind of talking about kayaking, does anyone have any PFD recommendations for canoeing/kayaking? I know this isn't really the appropriate thread, but I'm not sure where else to discuss. After a tipped canoe scare in the Boundary Waters last year, I've decided it's time to stop being an idiot and wear a PFD at all times when in the canoe. I'm leaning toward an automatic or manual inflatable for the reduced weight, heat, and arm restriction. I've heard mixed reviews, though - some people don't think they're reliable, some don't think they're comfortable, etc. Anyone have any thoughts? There's a 35lb-float manual model at Cabelas that I have my eye on.

Illuminado
Mar 26, 2008

The Path Ahead is Dark


Whoo! Got a nice Osprey Aether 85 pack and a Western Mountaineering Ultralight bag for Christmas/Birthday. Can't wait until I get to put some miles in on them!

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


stupid puma posted:

While we're kind of talking about kayaking, does anyone have any PFD recommendations for canoeing/kayaking? I know this isn't really the appropriate thread, but I'm not sure where else to discuss. After a tipped canoe scare in the Boundary Waters last year, I've decided it's time to stop being an idiot and wear a PFD at all times when in the canoe. I'm leaning toward an automatic or manual inflatable for the reduced weight, heat, and arm restriction. I've heard mixed reviews, though - some people don't think they're reliable, some don't think they're comfortable, etc. Anyone have any thoughts? There's a 35lb-float manual model at Cabelas that I have my eye on.

I've been totally happy wearing this on paddling trips
http://www.rei.com/product/782963/mti-reflex-pfd

Bought it 2 or so years ago, worn it twice on 4+ day trips. I don't even notice wearing it unless it's really hot and I'm sweating a ton with it on. The friend I go with doesn't wear a skirt (he has a real tall cockpit) or a PFD and I think he's completely insane.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I use that same brand, and it's always been just fine - stays out of the way, and I forget it's there an hour into paddling.

amethystbliss
Jan 17, 2006



I'm moving to New Zealand next month and plan to do most of the big treks (http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/great-walks/) plus a lot of day hikes. I'm very new to hiking and have pretty much only done day hikes as a tourist. The biggest hike I've done was in the Atlas Mountains during a holiday to Morocco, and it wasn't all that intensive.

I just bought a pair of boots (women's Salomon 3D Fastpacker) and just wanted to get some feedback to see if they're appropriate. Most of the great walks are rated as easy-moderate, but some are on the beach and some are in the mountains so I want to make sure these boots are good for lots of different terrain. I tried to post a photo, but imgur isn't working properly.

http://www.amazon.com/Salomon-3D-Fastpacker-GTX-Backpacking/dp/B0032UWPJE/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





Lipstick Apathy

For the person asking about Florida hiking, the backcountry trails in the Everglades are basically empty of other people. The scenery is kind of same for the entire 10mile trail (one way) but you'll see a lot more wildlife than most. I got to see a Florida kingsnake, copperhead, and striped crayfish snake in a day.

You can also go off trail as much as you want, but I didn't due to the fact it was waterways on both sides of the trail, and I wasn't in my swamp boots.

TerminalSaint
Apr 20, 2007


Where must we go...

we who wander this Wasteland in search of our better selves?


gently caress yeah, Christmas.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

Hi hiking thread. I ride bikes more than I hike but still get out fairly often. Here's a picture I took a couple weeks ago from the top of a hill, it's about a 2000ft climb right out of town:




Have a shoe question:

I think I saw the New Balance 1010 mentioned in here and tried some on the other day. Neat shoe but that store only had them in 2E which was too wide. I was thinking of getting a pair if I can find them in a store tomorrow in the size and color I like but am wondering what else I should be looking for. I'm going for something lighter and more running oriented than my current pair of Merrell boots.

jamal fucked around with this message at 07:17 on Dec 27, 2012

i_heart_ponies
Oct 16, 2005

because I love feces


amethystbliss posted:

I'm moving to New Zealand next month and plan to do most of the big treks (http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/great-walks/) plus a lot of day hikes. I'm very new to hiking and have pretty much only done day hikes as a tourist. The biggest hike I've done was in the Atlas Mountains during a holiday to Morocco, and it wasn't all that intensive.

I just bought a pair of boots (women's Salomon 3D Fastpacker) and just wanted to get some feedback to see if they're appropriate. Most of the great walks are rated as easy-moderate, but some are on the beach and some are in the mountains so I want to make sure these boots are good for lots of different terrain. I tried to post a photo, but imgur isn't working properly.

http://www.amazon.com/Salomon-3D-Fastpacker-GTX-Backpacking/dp/B0032UWPJE/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Those look like they'll be just fine for a basic all-around boot. They're reasonably light and built on a solid and comfy platform. The GTX designation means they have a Gore-Tex membrane, which I find to be uncomfortable in anything but a 'cool weather' boot for the mountains, but it depends on your comfort. I don't mind my feet getting wet, as long as they dry quickly.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

So I got 3 snow shovels and a snow saw for Christmas... Time to do some snow camping methinks. I had a collapsible black diamond snow shovel on my wish list so someone on one side of the family got me that then my dad who was an old school mountaineer in the cascades wrapped up and gave me two of his climbing snow shovels that he used to use. I'll probably use the black diamond for actual stuff and one of the old ones as a loaner for friends that join as well as to keep in the car for snowboard days.

I was hoping someone who has done some snow camping could recommend a good book or web resource for packing lists/preparedness as well as best practice type info. I've watched enough videos on building quinzhee huts that I think I'll have that figured out but the more prepared the better right?

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




I finally confessed to my mom just how bad my scrambling accident was last year.

She cried pretty hard, and is terrified of me heading out ever again. I assured her I changed my technique and am much more careful than I had been in the past. I won't make the same mistake ever again.

Ugh. Feeling kind of lovely about it. I'm not stopping entirely though. I just love it so much. I probably won't have a chance to go out until the spring anyway, so by then she'll have calmed down a bit. It's a good thing I didn't ask for any gear for Christmas.

PabloBOOM
Mar 10, 2004
Hunchback of DOOM

Edit: Deal I posted here ended, so um, guess I'll remove it. Hope everyone got any holiday gear requests granted.

I'm trying to get out another weekend or two before spring (and crowds) returns, and was thinking about heading to Linville Gorge for a one or two-nighter. Any advice from anyone familiar? I know it's pretty popular in the summer, but I was wondering if there's a bit more solitude in the winter.

PabloBOOM fucked around with this message at 16:09 on Dec 29, 2012

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

smilehigh
Nov 2, 2010

RUUUUUNNNNNNNN

So I just bought a pair of Columbia Daska Pass boots, they were 50% off (although I'm in Australia so that's still expensive)so I'm not super worried if they aren't that great, but I'd like to know if the store person was full of poo poo.

I'll probably be doing some easy mountains (not really a mountain more a really tall hill) here in Aus in the next couple of months, but they are mostly for when I go to the UK in April and do stuff there. I bought them under the impression that they are designed more for walking/hiking than climbing...was I wrong?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply