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Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Hiking & Backpacking Megathread: you must eat all day handful of gorp every 30

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Chard
Aug 24, 2010






henry coe is a fantastic park, but last time i looked the fires had closed most of the park, aside from plague closures. when it opens & you want to go with a goon PM me

slothrop
Dec 7, 2006

Santa Alpha, Fox One... Gifts Incoming ~~~>===|>



Soiled Meat

Yesterday I was going to hike and camp the first leg of the Great Ocean Walk in Victoria (Australia) but a combination of lack of experience, terrible weather forecast and a 4 hour each way drive caused me to reconsider.

Instead I went in the other direction, did an easy day hike at the tip of the Mornington Peninsula to an old fort. I saw a Blue Tongue Lizard and a very tame Echidna.

I also saw the beach where Australia misplaced their sitting Prime Minister, permanently.

Itís the most Australian thing I can think of, Harold Holt, abusing his position of power to gain access to a closed beach, disappears, presumed drowned leaving the country leaderless for 2 days. They named a swimming pool after him

Quiz
Mar 1, 2004
finally

wuffles posted:

Anyone with firsthand experience on the Wind River High Route with tips to share? Planning a trip for late July next year

I've been eyeballing this (or another Wind River long loop) for a few years. I have to assume you've seen Andrew Skurka's page? It has links to other people's trip reports of the route.

Sounds like July might be a little bit early. Bugs & potentially much snow on the ground. Reason you don't want to go later?

wuffles
Apr 9, 2004



Quiz posted:

I've been eyeballing this (or another Wind River long loop) for a few years. I have to assume you've seen Andrew Skurka's page? It has links to other people's trip reports of the route.

Sounds like July might be a little bit early. Bugs & potentially much snow on the ground. Reason you don't want to go later?

Yes, Iíve seen his page and plan to purchase his guide. My cousin is the one organizing the trip and heís opted for an 8 day trip from 7/27-8/3. So right at late july early augustóI am guessing weíre trying to thread the needle between bug pressure and the benefit of some snow still covering the talus.

At this point Iím trying to determine what I want to do footwear and the pants situation. Andrew says you can do it in trail runners with maybe some microspikes, but Iím not sure I want the wet feet that will come along with it. I already own a pair of Solomon Quests and Altra Timps that I like, and Iím considering an approach shoe like the LaSportiva TX3s. Just really unsure on that one. Its a bit crazy I think, but Iím considering taking the boots AND one of the other pairs.

My current pants for past trips in colorado and the sierras have been base layer, shorts with liners, and lightweight rain pants. That gives me a lot of flexibility but if I want bug protection on my legs while hiking in warmer daytime weather, Iím not sure just throwing on the rain pants over the shorts will work. If anyone has a recommendation for something relatively light, breathable, and unrestrictive to protect from bugs Iím all ears.

Syncopated
Oct 21, 2010


https://twitter.com/TheOnion/status/1354789833814790144?s=20

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009



Dumb idiot question: I've lived in the snowy north over my whole life, and never once used snowshoes. Growing up I never really saw them either, except the vintage tennis racket style ones that are always hanging on a wall in a backwoods bar. But I guess they're popular now? This weekend a pretty good blanket covered the midwest (10 inches or so) and when I went out into the winter wonderland there were snowshoe folks everywhere.

Do they actually make walking easier? Because they seemed to be huffing and puffing just as much as I was and not moving any faster. They definitely stayed on top of the snow better than I did but I saw no evidence of that translating to them being better for travel.

Best I can come up with is when the snow is extremely deep powder they'd become valuable, but I can't figure out how that turned them into being a fashionable piece of outdoor kit.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

In deep snow they definitely make walking MUCH easier. If you're walking a broken trail in less than maybe a foot of snow, and have good boots, they're more trouble than they're worth I think. If you're breaking the trail though, and/or if the snow is deep, they're invaluable.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

xzzy posted:

Dumb idiot question: I've lived in the snowy north over my whole life, and never once used snowshoes. Growing up I never really saw them either, except the vintage tennis racket style ones that are always hanging on a wall in a backwoods bar. But I guess they're popular now? This weekend a pretty good blanket covered the midwest (10 inches or so) and when I went out into the winter wonderland there were snowshoe folks everywhere.

Do they actually make walking easier? Because they seemed to be huffing and puffing just as much as I was and not moving any faster. They definitely stayed on top of the snow better than I did but I saw no evidence of that translating to them being better for travel.

Best I can come up with is when the snow is extremely deep powder they'd become valuable, but I can't figure out how that turned them into being a fashionable piece of outdoor kit.

There's definitely a niche where simple crampons or even just boots are more efficient and functional than snowshoes. Once you start post-holing or when you go between hard crusty-slick icy-powdery then snowshoes become better. Most of the use I see is when a trail gets all iced up and people will use really lightweight snowshoes that have no possible chance of floating you in the snow to not fall on their asses. You get some benefit of surface area over simple crampons. (Not mountaineering crampons)

Going out in three feet of snow with snowshoes is really hard work. Especially without a trail. Doing it without snowshoes is extraordinarily worse.

Kaal
May 22, 2002

JEREMY CORBYN BULLIED MY NAZI GRANDPA IN PRIMARY SCHOOL



Cleats like Kahtoola EXOspikes are pretty useful for the vast majority of snowy trail hikes (heavy-duty Microspikes are better for fresh snow, and light-duty Nanospikes are largely intended for streets with occasional ice patches). Snowshoeing is lots of fun, but they're really intended for off-trail usage with significant snow depth. If you're trudging through three feet of untouched powder, then you pull out the snowshoes.

Modern cleats work really well. Basically if you at all feel like you could slip on snow or ice, then you probably would benefit from cleats. They can very easily prevent you from a bad fall, and ensure that you can enjoy your hike rather than constantly focus on your next step. And they work in a lot of situations where you'd traditionally wear snowshoes.

Kaal fucked around with this message at 21:08 on Jan 31, 2021

lavaca
Jun 11, 2010


xzzy posted:

Dumb idiot question: I've lived in the snowy north over my whole life, and never once used snowshoes. Growing up I never really saw them either, except the vintage tennis racket style ones that are always hanging on a wall in a backwoods bar. But I guess they're popular now? This weekend a pretty good blanket covered the midwest (10 inches or so) and when I went out into the winter wonderland there were snowshoe folks everywhere.

Do they actually make walking easier? Because they seemed to be huffing and puffing just as much as I was and not moving any faster. They definitely stayed on top of the snow better than I did but I saw no evidence of that translating to them being better for travel.

Best I can come up with is when the snow is extremely deep powder they'd become valuable, but I can't figure out how that turned them into being a fashionable piece of outdoor kit.

Snowshoes are useful in deep, un-compacted snow. They're mostly pointless if the snow is packed down and not particularly deep. I never owned or felt like I needed snowshoes when I lived in Anchorage, where a good year is 120 inches of dry snow, but they're pretty handy in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest where the passes regularly see 500+ inches of snow in a single season.

Anyway, I think a lot of the people you see on snowshoes just heard that snowshoeing is a good way to burn a lot of calories and decided to try it out. In a foot of snow it's mostly just slower hiking. You don't really start working up an appetite unless you're blazing your own trail or trudging through deep powder.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009



Thanks all, that's kind of what I deduced as I typed the post out but never having done snow shoeing myself, reading the words of people that actually have would be nice anyways.

And yeah, I spent 10 years in Anchorage as a wee lad and never once saw them used.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Spikes are often not enough. When you're walking on this beautifully packed trail with your spikes and then start to fall through, that's a good signal that you should be wearing snowshoes. You're ruining the trail for everyone else that is wearing snowshoes, and everyone who wore snowshoes to make that nice flat wide trail for you in the first place.

There are snowshoe trails and chimney postholed-to-gently caress trails. Don't be a dick and turn the former into the latter.

khysanth
Jun 9, 2009

Still love you, Homar



Just went snowshoeing this past weekend in a few feet of fresh powder. Trail was not broken, they were a lifesaver. On the way down, a dude was following our tracks up wearing just microspikes and he was post-holing up to his knee, even on the snow that we partially compacted with our snowshoes.

Clayren
Jun 4, 2008

grandma plz don't folow me on twiter its embarassing, if u want to know what animes im watching jsut read the family newsletter like normal

Pennywise the Frown posted:

Southeast Wisconsin

If you haven't tried them yet, Paradise Springs and Scuppermong Springs are right near there. Paradise alone is too short of a (very easy) walk, but the sights are worth seeing and then you can go to Scuppermong for something more like a real hike. If you don't mind crossing the border slightly you can head over to Rockton in Illinois (unlike Wisconsin you can visit our parks without buying a car sticker) and hike Nygren Wetlands. Teaming with birds (sandhill and whooping cranes as well as blue herons) and frogs.

But yeah, for a bit of terrain height your closest bet is the Driftless Area around Dubuque (Horseshoe Bluff is fantastic and if you're in the area definitely check out Crystal Lake Cave) or Starved Rock (I think Matthieson, it's sister park, is better).

Qubee
May 31, 2013






What happens if you're hiking in the Lake District and have a picnic in a field? One time I was doing that and ended it abruptly as the farmer came with a tractor and started putting hay down on the faaaar end of the field for the sheep that were there. I thought it may have been trespassing or illegal, even though I was being extra careful not to make a mess, and I was collecting all my litter as I made it (not that there was much, I was eating bread and cheese and some beef). So I quickly gathered up my stuff and left.

Is it technically allowed? Or does it all depend on the farmer. Because it seemed as if no matter where I tried walking, I'd be hopping fences and entering someone's land. Just wanted to see what the general consensus is in the thread.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






https://www.gov.uk/right-of-way-open-access-land/use-your-right-to-roam

Looks like a lot of info here. I've always found right to roam laws interesting. I wish we had that in the US, but you'd probably just get shot.

Aphex-
Jan 29, 2006



Dinosaur Gum

Qubee posted:

What happens if you're hiking in the Lake District and have a picnic in a field? One time I was doing that and ended it abruptly as the farmer came with a tractor and started putting hay down on the faaaar end of the field for the sheep that were there. I thought it may have been trespassing or illegal, even though I was being extra careful not to make a mess, and I was collecting all my litter as I made it (not that there was much, I was eating bread and cheese and some beef). So I quickly gathered up my stuff and left.

Is it technically allowed? Or does it all depend on the farmer. Because it seemed as if no matter where I tried walking, I'd be hopping fences and entering someone's land. Just wanted to see what the general consensus is in the thread.

Whenever I've wild camped in the Lake District it's always been above the tree line or the last wall of fields. Usually when you're up in the fells it's not an issues whatsoever.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009



Fitzy Fitz posted:

https://www.gov.uk/right-of-way-open-access-land/use-your-right-to-roam

Looks like a lot of info here. I've always found right to roam laws interesting. I wish we had that in the US, but you'd probably just get shot.

Or spend years in a courtroom, making you wish you got shot.

In this splendid land of freedom you're trespassing if you step over the corner of someone's property to access public land. Your feet may never actually touch their hallowed grounds but you can be punished as if you did.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Fitzy Fitz posted:

in the US, but you'd probably just get shot.

This is not a joke. Do not trespass in the US.

Head Bee Guy
Jun 12, 2011

Retarded for Busting

Grimey Drawer

Not really sure where the best place to post this would be, but I'm looking to get some non-cotton shirts for the summer. Something sweat-wicking and breathable. I'll mostly be wearing them around town, riding my bike, or otherwise being active. Who's got the nice tech without a high price tag?

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






Check out ross or similar stores, that's where I've gotten I think all my hiking shirts.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

No Balls No Game


Head Bee Guy posted:

Not really sure where the best place to post this would be, but I'm looking to get some non-cotton shirts for the summer. Something sweat-wicking and breathable. I'll mostly be wearing them around town, riding my bike, or otherwise being active. Who's got the nice tech without a high price tag?

Personally I think the best base layers in the world are Patagonia capilene. They are expensive but I wear them all the time so they're a place where I am willing to spend a little. For a cheaper option, I recently had Terramar Transport t shirts recommended to me, I think I will pick some up to see how they do. At this price it'd be silly not to: https://www.sierra.com/s~transport/

The Fool
Oct 16, 2003



gohuskies posted:

Patagonia capilene.[/url]

I have one of these shirts and it is quite good.

I also have a couple icebreaker merino wool shirts that I like

Betazoid
Aug 2, 2010

Hallo. Ik ben een leeuw.

gohuskies posted:

Personally I think the best base layers in the world are Patagonia capilene. They are expensive but I wear them all the time so they're a place where I am willing to spend a little. For a cheaper option, I recently had Terramar Transport t shirts recommended to me, I think I will pick some up to see how they do. At this price it'd be silly not to: https://www.sierra.com/s~transport/

For the ladies (and gents? don't know) I love the 32° tops and leggings. I run cold in all seasons, and 32° tops are a delightful base. They don't pill much and stretch enough for boobs and hips.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Costco has tech tee shirts (32* cool) usually in a two pack for like $5-10 and they're good for the price.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





Betazoid posted:

For the ladies (and gents? don't know) I love the 32į tops and leggings. I run cold in all seasons, and 32į tops are a delightful base. They don't pill much and stretch enough for boobs and hips.

I am a guy and I replaced almost all of my clothing with 32į stuff. Itís comfortable doesnít hold onto water because itís synthetic and most importantly cheap.

If youíre not in a super hurry to get the clothing sign up for their newsletter. They run pretty frequent sales that can save you a pretty significant chunk of change on their website.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Uniqlo's airism line is nice

Internet Wizard
Aug 9, 2009

BANDAIDS DON'T FIX BULLET HOLES



REI has a line of wicking tees these days that go on sale fairly often

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



I swear by Patagonia's Nine Trails shirts but I think they are now just their Capilene Cool Trail line now. That knit polyester weave is great

Alamoduh
Sep 12, 2011


Iíve made plans to thru hike the Appalachian Trail with a Northbound start date of April 15. I hate to say it, but the best information on AT stuff is...Reddit ugh.

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



Whiteblaze was invaluable for my lead up. Otherwise I used the AT Guide and a free version of what essentially was Guthooks. Seems like Guthooks is THE guide to use these days.

Youíre gonna have such a blast!

Pinus Porcus
May 14, 2019

Ranger McFriendly


Head Bee Guy posted:

Not really sure where the best place to post this would be, but I'm looking to get some non-cotton shirts for the summer. Something sweat-wicking and breathable. I'll mostly be wearing them around town, riding my bike, or otherwise being active. Who's got the nice tech without a high price tag?

I agree with everyone about Costco.

Also, I have had amazing luck at thrift stores getting practically brand new tech wear (Nike, Under Armour, REI etc) dirt cheap. Lots of money spent on quickly broken new year's resolutions out there. This can be area dependent, so YMMV

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I should have also mentioned one of my tried and true favorites, target. They usually have inexpensive stuff and it goes on sale often.

WoodrowSkillson
Feb 24, 2005






Yep, I use cheap form fitting athletic shirts from target and have never had a complaint

Math You
Oct 27, 2010

So put your faith
in more than steel


My new faves are Columbia Silver Ridge II long sleeve.
Shirt is really light, packs well, comes out of stuff sacks close to wrinkle free, and has great ventilation.

Best of all it's very adaptable to changing conditions. I can roll up the sleeves and open some buttons if I'm working up a sweat in the woods, or flip up the collar to protect the back of my neck when I'm out in the sun.

I spend a lot of time out on the water so I've gone full on old man with my outdoor research Tilley style hat and long sleeved, collared shirts. Really has reduced the instances of heat exhaustion and sunburn in the last couple of years.

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




Uniqlo Airism shirts are the only way I survive biking/hiking in Florida summer. They're incredibly thin and breezy, but offer almost no sun protection so be wary of that. They also get pretty stinky like any synthetic clothing.

Math You posted:

My new faves are Columbia Silver Ridge II long sleeve.

I have a couple of these I wear out in Utah and they're great. You can even find them on Amazon for ~$20 sometimes.

cerious
Aug 18, 2010



Math You posted:

My new faves are Columbia Silver Ridge II long sleeve.
Shirt is really light, packs well, comes out of stuff sacks close to wrinkle free, and has great ventilation.

Best of all it's very adaptable to changing conditions. I can roll up the sleeves and open some buttons if I'm working up a sweat in the woods, or flip up the collar to protect the back of my neck when I'm out in the sun.

I spend a lot of time out on the water so I've gone full on old man with my outdoor research Tilley style hat and long sleeved, collared shirts. Really has reduced the instances of heat exhaustion and sunburn in the last couple of years.

I have the exact same shirts and hat and they're awesome. Wear them pretty much all seasons for hiking.

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


I got a few Colombia PFG shirts for that purpose. Long sleeves, SPF 50, hooded, and cheap from the local outlet. I think they were 25 bucks apiece but I paid less than that stacking a coupon with a special they had going on.

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pumped up for school
Nov 24, 2010



Guest2553 posted:

I got a few Colombia PFG shirts for that purpose. Long sleeves, SPF 50, hooded, and cheap from the local outlet. I think they were 25 bucks apiece but I paid less than that stacking a coupon with a special they had going on.

I love these because of the hood! Reminds me to start watching for a sale, thanks.

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