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PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Haha no it didn't look like terrible Photoshop. I guess I've never heard of a fisher, but wow it really looked like Wikipedia's picture of a marten. Unfortunately this location is a desert most of the year, so it doesn't seem like either would survive. A wolverine is rather large. A few trip reports mention marmots, but I didn't know they lived much below the tree line.

Well now I have some reading to do in any case. Sorry there's no picture, but many thanks for the fuzzy suggestions!

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Anachronist
Feb 13, 2009




Spokane is like jam packed with marmots near the river, and itís well below tree line. Not sure what makes it an appealing place for them but thereís that.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Haha no it didn't look like terrible Photoshop. I guess I've never heard of a fisher, but wow it really looked like Wikipedia's picture of a marten. Unfortunately this location is a desert most of the year, so it doesn't seem like either would survive. A wolverine is rather large. A few trip reports mention marmots, but I didn't know they lived much below the tree line.

Well now I have some reading to do in any case. Sorry there's no picture, but many thanks for the fuzzy suggestions!

I would put money on a marmot. They are all over the place in Sun Lakes and Dry Falls area and Ancient Lakes is the same kind of habitat. Bonus if you heard it whistling.

khysanth
Jun 9, 2009

Still love you, Homar



Tai posted:

Anyone have a zpacks tent? Thinking of picking up the 3 man/triplex to use myself and partner for hiking. Heard good things but wanted a bit more feed back before I hit go on a tent that is double the price of other tents.

I don't have a Zpacks tent but I'm really familiar with their products and the offerings from other smaller ultralight manufacturers. What are you looking for in a tent? Fit 2+? Double-wall or single-wall important to you? Trekking pole supported or free-standing? Budget?

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




I have an opportunity to develop some local guided geology hikes. I have lots of experience, knowledge, and resources, now it's just trying to figure out what other people might actually be interested in because I'm kind of a weirdo and what I find neat might be boring to others. So some scouting missions are going to be in order once I feel well enough to get out on my feet again.

Tai
Mar 8, 2006

Chav

khysanth posted:

I don't have a Zpacks tent but I'm really familiar with their products and the offerings from other smaller ultralight manufacturers. What are you looking for in a tent? Fit 2+? Double-wall or single-wall important to you? Trekking pole supported or free-standing? Budget?

Super light (so I guess single wall/tarp), super durable and either trekking pole or two poles. Basically what the zpacks triplex is. Just wanting to know is it poo poo hot before I drop money into it (or other/better companies who are cheaper but just as good).

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Picnic Princess posted:

I have an opportunity to develop some local guided geology hikes. I have lots of experience, knowledge, and resources, now it's just trying to figure out what other people might actually be interested in because I'm kind of a weirdo and what I find neat might be boring to others. So some scouting missions are going to be in order once I feel well enough to get out on my feet again.
You're pnw right? I might be interested and might have a friend or two.

Tigren
Oct 3, 2003


Tai posted:

Super light (so I guess single wall/tarp), super durable and either trekking pole or two poles. Basically what the zpacks triplex is. Just wanting to know is it poo poo hot before I drop money into it (or other/better companies who are cheaper but just as good).

There's a reason why Z-Packs is still around even though their tents start at $500. They are extremely high quality and do everything they say they do. The customer support is top notch and you can get everything super customized if you need it.
Just know what you're getting into when you're making the purchase. Cuben isn't exactly what I would call durable, but if you treat it nicely, it'll last you 1000s of miles.

Tai
Mar 8, 2006

Chav

Does it need a foot print/ground sheet under it? Heard people don't but still...digging for the finer details.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

You're pnw right? I might be interested and might have a friend or two.

Canadian Rockies, Banff and Kananaskis area. I'd really like to share knowledge of Kananaskis because it's a real jewel not many people know about, plus I'd be based out of Canmore. There's some pretty crazy history here to talk about too aside from just natural history stuff, like Japanese internment camps and a cave carved into the side of a mountain to store documents in case the Cold War turned into a real war.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Picnic Princess posted:

I have an opportunity to develop some local guided geology hikes. I have lots of experience, knowledge, and resources, now it's just trying to figure out what other people might actually be interested in because I'm kind of a weirdo and what I find neat might be boring to others. So some scouting missions are going to be in order once I feel well enough to get out on my feet again.

This is hands down my favorite part of going hiking with new people, especially ones that know stuff about local plants, mushrooms, history, and especially geology. It turns what is an otherwise interesting hike with good views into the the best hikes I've ever been on--you should absolutely do this.

One of my favorite people to go hiking with is a former field archeologist for the National Park Service, and it's amazing when he points out stuff I've hiked dozens of times and never noticed the foundation blocks for a house that once stood there and stuff like that.

One of my buddies in another group started doing a monthly downtown architecture and beer hike. Starts out in a metro park, hits rotating breweries along the way, and he talks about points of interest. For anyone interested in this kind of thing, check out Clio--it's an app dedicated to nearby points of interest, though its database is still being built up.

khysanth
Jun 9, 2009

Still love you, Homar



Tai posted:

Super light (so I guess single wall/tarp), super durable and either trekking pole or two poles. Basically what the zpacks triplex is. Just wanting to know is it poo poo hot before I drop money into it (or other/better companies who are cheaper but just as good).

The Triplex will probably be fine for you guys. I wouldn't take it out in super windy or snowy conditions, but for basically all mild 3 season/shoulder season weather you should be good.

Tai posted:

Does it need a foot print/ground sheet under it? Heard people don't but still...digging for the finer details.

It uses 1.0oz/sqyd DCF for the floor so you probably don't need any sort of footprint. If you want to be extra careful, just buy some polycro and cut it to the bathtub footprint size. Weight will only be ~2oz.

Also do you really need the Triplex? How big are you guys? Are you planning on bringing a 3rd or a dog? The Duplex might be plenty big for you and will save $100 and some weight. The Triplex is just a wider version of the Duplex. You can fit a lot of gear in the vestibules. If you guys are fine with a 2P shelter, that opens up more options from other cottage manufacturers who don't really make 3P shelters:

Gossamer Gear The Two - $389, 2P silnylon, similar to Duplex, 29oz

Some other options from Yama Mountain Gear, Hyperlite Mountain Gear, Six Moon Designs, TarpTent, etc.

khysanth fucked around with this message at 18:55 on Mar 20, 2018

Tai
Mar 8, 2006

Chav

I'm 6 foot 2 so not super big but we've found with 2 man tents, it can start a row. For the sake of an extra few oz, I'd rather have the space honestly. My other half is a touch messy in the tent (and I am too sometimes) so it would give us the room we need to throw gear around etc. Plus, I'd string up some para cord along the width at the highest point for a drying line when the weather sucks. The only downside is pitch placement is a touch more restrictive.

khysanth
Jun 9, 2009

Still love you, Homar



Gotcha. I'm 6'3" and use a Six Moon Designs Haven Tarp and NetTent. We have the cuben/DCF model from 2015 that is no longer produced, so it's pretty light as well.

Double-wall, two person tent for a total of about ~28oz. 114" long (compared to 100" long on the Duplex/Triplex) with an offset peak (compared to center peak on Duplex/Triplex) make for much better sitting up head room.

The silnylon Haven plus NetTent would set you back about $400 seam-sealed and weigh ~36oz roughly.

The Aardvark
Aug 19, 2013



Went out to Kitchen Creek Falls today, which is just off mile 16/17 of the PCT. On the way back down ran into about 16 or 17 thru-hikers since it's that time of the year.




The trail's beginning starts by crossing under the 8 and then going up some switchbacks. On the way back to the car found a rattlesnake under a rock.










I bet this looked better last month, but it's par the course for waterfalls for us.

carticket
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Hello old friend, hiking thread. I am getting back to hiking after a for injury and I'm looking to find a better pack. Right now, I have a Kelty Redwing 3100 (old model) that I like very much, but it's like a day and a half pack. At the other end I have an "estrn mntn sprts" (because no vowels is hip, right?) half day pack. It fits a bladder, some bars, and maybe you can shove one layer in (it's basically a pair of shoulder straps for a bladder, with a fanny pack strapped to it).

I've used both recently and neither was satisfying. I would like to get something in between that I could use for a day hike. Is want to pack a bladder, room for a rain shell, layer or two, some food, first aid, etc. The Redwing is 50L which is big. I'm thinking something in the 20-30 L range. I have a long torso and I'm overweight so those are important factors in fit. I also really like having attachment points for things and a way to stow poles when not in use. Maybe this is a tall order. Any suggestions?

Bonus: at some point I'm going to get a backpacking pack. I couldn't fit all my stuff in the Redwing and the weight distribution was all wrong and it ruined the trip. The Redwing goes wide and deep, so I'd be looking for something tall moreso.

Vivian Darkbloom
Jul 14, 2004



Mr. Powers posted:


I've used both recently and neither was satisfying. I would like to get something in between that I could use for a day hike. Is want to pack a bladder, room for a rain shell, layer or two, some food, first aid, etc. The Redwing is 50L which is big. I'm thinking something in the 20-30 L range. I have a long torso and I'm overweight so those are important factors in fit. I also really like having attachment points for things and a way to stow poles when not in use. Maybe this is a tall order. Any suggestions?

I have been very happy with an Osprey Talon 22, which has a hydration pocket, plenty of room for day hike stuff, and loops to carry trekking poles. I would recommend trying it on, but there is a large size available that might work well for you. It's at the low end of the range you gave but I don't really think more than 20L is super important for most day hikes - I know I can carry plenty of food, water, and layers in this pack. It also has a suspended back mesh which is very good at keeping my back dry.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Caveats: Locations, conditions. My day hiking pack is 30L, and while I don't often have it full, it's pressured on 15mi hikes, snowshoeing trips, or windy and/or cold days with lots of moisture (jacket, gloves, waterproof shell mittens, etc.).

So mummy bag buddies, how many of you rotate in the bag versus the bag rotating? In the first case the bottom of the bag is always down, even if you're on your side. In the latter, the zipper will always be in your same side, even if you're sleeping on your face. In the first case, which is my usual style, lots of moisture gets trapped and things get clammy.

I decided to give the second approach a try tonight in my 55F bedroom. I made it through 270deg, the opening cinched around my face, before the bag failed to follow and the zipper was spiraled 180deg around me and the opening was gone. :confuoot: I'm not claustrophobic but let's just say I flailed around to extricate myself. I guess suffocation is the only outcome of this while sleeping.

What's the trick?

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Vivian Darkbloom posted:

I have been very happy with an Osprey Talon 22,

The Talon series rules, the 22 for winter, the 11 for summer.

waffle enthusiast
Nov 16, 2007





I love the talon 22. I take it riding, peak bagging, walking around with the kids, whatever. The stuff pocket is great for layers, and itís generally just a really well though out bag.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004


:911:
:wookie: :thermidor: :wookie:
:dehumanize:

:pirate::hf::tinfoil:


Cat hikes = Best hikes

carticket
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


The Talons look pretty good. I'll have to plan a trip to REI to check them out. I am not sure an 11 will be big enough for me for a 3 season day pack. I hike in the Whites so even on nice days I pack a lot of different stuff (most of which I probably won't need, but you never know), but I'll take a look at both. I need to actually measure my torso. I'm guessing the proper size for me would be XL but they don't actually have those except for a few of the backpacking packs.

carticket
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Ok, nevermind. I just snagged one from REI.com for $88. A few bucks in dividends, a 20% off for members coupon, and free shipping, plus I get to avoid the sales tax of going to the nearest REI (in Mass). It seems really well reviewed.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



taqueso posted:

Cat hikes = Best hikes


What kind of cat is that, other than the best kind?

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENI»RE IN ME


domestic long hair

Anachronist
Feb 13, 2009




I got outside this weekend, went backpacking at Ancient Lakes near Vantage, WA. Nice this time of year, I assume it gets miserably hot there soon. We got a late start and so werenít on the trail until 4pm. There were a bunch of other backpackers out there as well: two groups of 8 or so plus probably a dozen 1-2 person groups. While eating dinner we could see four other groups off in the distance sitting and watching the scenery. We also got to see the full moon rise which was a nice treat.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Caveats: Locations, conditions. My day hiking pack is 30L, and while I don't often have it full, it's pressured on 15mi hikes, snowshoeing trips, or windy and/or cold days with lots of moisture (jacket, gloves, waterproof shell mittens, etc.).

So mummy bag buddies, how many of you rotate in the bag versus the bag rotating? In the first case the bottom of the bag is always down, even if you're on your side. In the latter, the zipper will always be in your same side, even if you're sleeping on your face. In the first case, which is my usual style, lots of moisture gets trapped and things get clammy.

I decided to give the second approach a try tonight in my 55F bedroom. I made it through 270deg, the opening cinched around my face, before the bag failed to follow and the zipper was spiraled 180deg around me and the opening was gone. :confuoot: I'm not claustrophobic but let's just say I flailed around to extricate myself. I guess suffocation is the only outcome of this while sleeping.

What's the trick?

I think the key is to have the right size sleeping bag for your body, if it's too big you will move around inside it, and also your body has to heat up the air around you (people argue about this but I can't understand why). I sleep as you describe but inside a goretex bivvy bag and the sleeping bag moves with me but the outer bag doesn't. The hood probably also needs to fit well around your head.


Re: backpacks, I am late to the game but I would always recommend looking for a bag with good compression straps so if it's not full the slack can be taken up. Mountaineering packs tend to be great as they are lightweight and without too many unnecessary features, but durable. I have this Lowe Alpine one and it's awesome: https://www.needlesports.com/884/products/lowe-alpine-alpine-attack-35-45-black.aspx

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004


:911:
:wookie: :thermidor: :wookie:
:dehumanize:

:pirate::hf::tinfoil:


eSporks posted:

What kind of cat is that, other than the best kind?

Fred is a maine coon rescue and the sweetest little guy.



OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

taqueso posted:

Cat hikes = Best hikes



This is amazing, mine would claw the poo poo out of me

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:


I decided to give the second approach a try tonight in my 55F bedroom. I made it through 270deg, the opening cinched around my face, before the bag failed to follow and the zipper was spiraled 180deg around me and the opening was gone. :confuoot: I'm not claustrophobic but let's just say I flailed around to extricate myself. I guess suffocation is the only outcome of this while sleeping.

What's the trick?

Ditch the sleeping bag and get a nice quilt. Been using one with my hammock for years and it's a huge quality of life improvement. I've also used it with a bivy and sleeping pad a few times, and I'll be doing that for a week out in Arizona here soon, and it's much better (and lighter) than a sleeping bag


Also, nthing how much I like the Talon 22 for cycling and day hiking. Very well thought out, very useable pack.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Has anyone here flown with a backpacking pack before, and if so, what was your experience? Besides a multi tool and fuel canister, what other stuff should I leave behind? I just want to make sure I don't get to the airport and am told I have I can't take or have to throw out X expensive backpacking thing.

I also don't want to check my bag since it'll just get torn and busted, and since we'll be transferring fights I'm paranoid any checked bags won't make the transfer and then I'm hosed. Does anyone have any advice for bringing backpacking packs as carry on luggage?

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENI»RE IN ME


OSU_Matthew posted:

Has anyone here flown with a backpacking pack before, and if so, what was your experience? Besides a multi tool and fuel canister, what other stuff should I leave behind? I just want to make sure I don't get to the airport and am told I have I can't take or have to throw out X expensive backpacking thing.

I also don't want to check my bag since it'll just get torn and busted, and since we'll be transferring fights I'm paranoid any checked bags won't make the transfer and then I'm hosed. Does anyone have any advice for bringing backpacking packs as carry on luggage?

Yes I've flown with one. I think I shipped everything that I thought they might consider an issue, including hiking poles, and I might have even shipped my tent poles. I don't know that you really have to do that but I wasn't taking any chances. I think I also shipped my stove because once upon a time I heard it can set off the chemical detectors if they do a search. Bear can and food was also shipped ahead of time but that was mostly for convenience, I don't think they'd care but I could see them making you dig out the bear can to take a look.

I just kept my bag as carry on and it fit in the overhead fine, but I don't have a huge backpack or anything (ULA Circuit), so if you have a big one and carry a lot of stuff that might not work for you.

Anachronist
Feb 13, 2009




Iíve flown with my backpack before, I checked it. Depending on the airline / airport they may have plastic bags you can put your bag in to protect the straps. I wouldnít count on it though. I washed my stove pretty thoroughly on the recommendation of the internet and didnít bring a canister.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


I realize you're asking for carry-on, but just in case you wanted another option, the wife and I got these covers from Osprey and put our bags in that then checked them. Still have to take out fuel, but otherwise we were good to go.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


OSU_Matthew posted:

Has anyone here flown with a backpacking pack before, and if so, what was your experience? Besides a multi tool and fuel canister, what other stuff should I leave behind? I just want to make sure I don't get to the airport and am told I have I can't take or have to throw out X expensive backpacking thing.

I also don't want to check my bag since it'll just get torn and busted, and since we'll be transferring fights I'm paranoid any checked bags won't make the transfer and then I'm hosed. Does anyone have any advice for bringing backpacking packs as carry on luggage?

At least a half dozen times or so. I almost always check it because a lot of the gear can't be carried on (stoves, ice axes, crampons, knives, etc). Depending on the bag/gear/length of trip, I usually cant fit my pack into the overhead bins, especially on smaller regional planes where the overhead space is smaller than normal. I bring a carry on day pack that has whatever non-hiking clothes I need, normal shoes (wear my hiking boots or vice versa), and other stuff I might need on the plane. I have a Gregory 50L pack that will fit in most overhead bins so long as I don't overpack it but its a gamble if the airline thinks its too big. My bigger packs definitely won't fit and its not even worth trying.

When I'm traveling (not hiking) I just tighten all the straps, wrap the hip belt around the back of the pack and secure, tie all the dangling straps so they aren't dangling. I wrap my chest strap around both shoulder straps to keep them together. Make sure your pack is secure (lid isn't loose and falling off, zippers are together and close to a corner/one side etc). I've never had an issue with damages or getting lost.

For hiking trips, I put my entire pack into a duffel bag (military style or REI duffel). They run $15-30. I usually keep it in the car at the trailhead along with my daypack of clean clothes. If you're going somewhere that you won't be renting a car to get to the trail, that might be a problem as you won't want to carry these on your whole trip. You could always buy a large plastic bag and just bring it with you.



That keeps your pack material from getting damaged, its cheaper than replacing your pack, and it can be folded down small and stored easily. You could also see if they have the large plastic bags as a cheaper disposable option but they aren't always available.

Also for stoves, I've never had a problem. I've brought liquid fuel stoves, empty fuel bottle with lid off, and canister stoves (without the fuel canister). Clean them before traveling and you should be fine.

Verman fucked around with this message at 18:49 on Apr 10, 2018

DeesGrandpa
Oct 21, 2009



I just use a massive REI 85 liter backpack in lieu of buying luggage whenever I'm going on a long trip and it's suffered no damage while checked.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Awesome! That's good to know that there aren't any major red flags about flying with backpacking gear! I'd check it inside a duffel or something, but all the missing luggage stories I've heard are from when you transfer flights but your luggage doesn't, so I don't want to take that risk.

Levitate posted:

Yes I've flown with one. I think I shipped everything that I thought they might consider an issue, including hiking poles, and I might have even shipped my tent poles. I don't know that you really have to do that but I wasn't taking any chances. I think I also shipped my stove because once upon a time I heard it can set off the chemical detectors if they do a search. Bear can and food was also shipped ahead of time but that was mostly for convenience, I don't think they'd care but I could see them making you dig out the bear can to take a look.

I just kept my bag as carry on and it fit in the overhead fine, but I don't have a huge backpack or anything (ULA Circuit), so if you have a big one and carry a lot of stuff that might not work for you.

I've got a Zpacks Arc Haul, so I'm even more worried about it getting damaged than my Osprey. I hadn't even thought about my hiking poles, hopefully they'll be fine collapsed down and packed in the bag. Thankfully I'm packing light since I might need to carry two gallons of water on this trip, so just a quilt, inflatable pad, and bivy for shelter. I might take my food out in the ratsack and carry it on as a personal item, which should srink my pack down small enough for a carry on.

Is been non-stop winter over here, so it's going to be an interesting transition spending a week in the desert :ohdear:

Medieval Medic
Sep 8, 2011


Figured I should ask here since the Take a Hike subforum has almost no activity.

Anyone else get extreme lack of appetite and stomach sensitivity when hiking? I find it a struggle to get energy in me during day hikes, usually I might force myself to eat a cereal bar every hour of hiking, but once I get to the end of the trail before returning I see people just munching down on their food happily and I can never bring myself to eat, which is quite terrible, as 130 cal from energy bars every hour when I am burning over 500 per hour is quite the deficit to run and certainly saps my strength.

Only once I am back at the trailhead after 6+ hours do I eat a decent meal, and by that point now that the hike is over I get extremely hungry. Any tips?

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

I generally donít eat during day hikes, other than the occasional stoned snack, and when backpacking my appetite generally craters after the second day. I donít really pay much mind, a couple days of calorie deficiency isnít going to kill me, it just means that I can pack a lot less food.

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


bongwizzard posted:

I generally donít eat during day hikes, other than the occasional stoned snack, and when backpacking my appetite generally craters after the second day. I donít really pay much mind, a couple days of calorie deficiency isnít going to kill me, it just means that I can pack a lot less food.

:same: except for the :420:

I have a pretty slow metabolism and only have snacks unless I'm doing more than a few hours, but it sounds like Medic has something more going on with that description.

What do you mean when you say stomach sensitivity? Like you can't hold down food or start to feel ill? If it's impacting your ability to go ham on the trail maybe you need to see a nutritionist to find a way around it, or sports physician to see if there's something underlying.

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gross
Jan 6, 2006

Well, here's your problem!


Medieval Medic posted:

Anyone else get extreme lack of appetite and stomach sensitivity when hiking?

Are you hanging with people who really push the pace compared to what you would do on your own, or how hard do you feel like you're working? If I have issues like that on a hike or trail run, it usually comes from keeping the exertion level too high, or just not keeping up with hydration.

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