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stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Time Cowboy posted:

I get so sick of trail mix, but I guess it's an old standby for a reason. Maybe if I buy bulk peanuts and M&M's, I can make my own mix for much less money than the pre-mixed packages go for. Bringing some sugary caffeine sounds like an excellent (terrible) idea, though! Thanks.

I can't tell you how many middle of nowhere grocery stores/targets/walmarts/quick-e-marts/etc I've stood in the parking lot of dumping a bag of M&Ms, a can of peanuts, and a box of raisins into a gallon zip lock bag. There's pretty much no need to ever buy the commercial stuff.

When that gets boring, I've come up with some tasty accidents grabbing handfuls of random dry stuff in my kitchen on my way out to something. I would have never had any idea that pretzels, butterscotch chocolate chips, and granola taste good together if I stuck to store-bought stuff :)

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stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Canna Happy posted:

Go to your local thrift stores/st vinnys/goodwill etc and check the racks. Any poly dress/western shirt will work fine and will be super cheap. Pants will be a touch harder. Try the thrift stores first and then move on to the REI/local outfitters sale racks and pick through them.
As far as actual outdoorsy brands, I really really like Outdoor Research's line of button up short sleeve shirts. They don't stink as soon and they dry super fast.
Had to come out from lurking for a cautionary tale on this. I'm not sure I'd do this. I have some cheap/lovely thrift store poly shirts that are akin to wearing a trash bag, which I'm pretty sure would kill me if I was depending on them for hiking. A lot of times, though, there are some decent outdoors/athletic shirts at the thrift store.

If you don't need dressy (not sure if I missed somewhere you said you did), Target's C9 brand is a good place to start. I've got several of their "super advanced wicking materials (polyester)" t shirts, and they do the job while hiking. If you want something a little less under-armor looking, but don't want to pay legit outdoor gear prices, look around for hunting clothes. They're never ultra-light, but they're designed for similar activities, and can often be found cheaper.

Also, check ebay for some older North Face button up shirts. I've got a few from the early 2000s that are going strong 10 years later, and that I completely love. They're my go-to travel shirts.

edit: to out myself as a complete loving nerd, I like to hike in a slightly too big, soft-ish (not shiny race material) bike jersey. Pockets in the back, big zipper in the front, comfy as hell, designed to keep you cool. The downside is that I look like a huge dork.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 14:28 on Apr 15, 2013

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


While we're on Midwest chat, is there any place decent to backpack in Ohio, preferably in the Northeast of the state? I am assuming there's some good stuff down near the WV/OH border, but I'm looking for somewhere nice to walk for a few hours, spend the night, and walk out. Nothing major, just a little backwoods overnight.

Every place I've lived except here has good trails where overnight backpacking trips are plentiful, but I'm coming up with nothing here. Cleveland has less of an outdoors "scene" than even Buffalo.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.



68 litres isn't exactly getting into an extended expedition sized pack. Frankly, I'm not sure how you'd fit two people's gear in there. It will work just fine for your gear for a 1-3 night backpacking trip, though.

But for what you want to do, just get a decent day pack. You don't need to go fancy, anything with structured/padded straps that have some kind of a shape to them (not just thin rectangles hanging off the top of the pack), a hip belt, and a padded back for some support will be fine. If it's hydration bladder compatible so much the better.

You shouldn't have issue finding a pack like that for $50 $50-75 or so. I've been using a Lafuma pack that I got for like $20 at Sierra Trading Post for a decade now, and I adore the thing. I think my $20 even got me a hydration bladder.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 17:49 on Jun 6, 2013

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


contrapants posted:

They're a little bigger then I need. I was hoping that if I ever did get to go on an overnight trip, I wouldn't need to get a different bag. I thought that 20-30L would probably be a good compromise. The 40L caught my eye, but it's gigantic for my needs. The pricing just threw me off.

That's not really going to be realistic unless you're planning on doing an insane ultralight overnight.

20-25 liters is perfect for a day pack.

You really can't walk a middle road on this one and not have it suck. :)

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


contrapants posted:

I found something similar to the Osprey Stratos that a foolish piantist wrote about. http://www.rei.com/product/853143/platypus-origin-22-hydration-pack-20-2012-closeout It is cheaper right now because of the sale and already comes with a nice reservoir. The other points in the description make it look like this would be a good deal.
Negatives are lack of any variety of an outside pocket (in my experience, ones on the hip belt are useless), but the way it's designed so that you can crush the pack way down with the straps is pretty sweet. It'll probably serve you well.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Or, if you don't need the city, I used to live in the shithole that is Greeley. It's not a great town but it was cheap as hell, and a nice springboard for adventure too. It's out on the plains, so it's definitely a different living experience than something like Boulder or Denver, but it's like an hour drive to RMNP, and you can watch the weather come off Long's Peak every afternoon.

If I had to do it again, I'd live in Ft Collins. It's got a great university town feel with far less new age baggage than Boulder.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Dr. Video Games 0089 posted:

My entire wardrobe is either beige, light blue, or white (white hat!) except for my black bag. I'll be bringing up to 5L of water in bladder form and a handful of salt pills.

I've spent a lot of time scrambling around the SW desert (Joshua Tree is beautiful, BTW), but I'm also a sweaty, goony motherfucker so take this with some grains of salt. Depending how long you're planning on hiking, 5L may not be enough. Always better to have more water than less. Fill up your bladder and toss another quart or two in your bag. For a 4-5 hour hike, I would generally fill my bladder (I think it's a gallon), and then carry a large bottled water too (one of those 64 ounce monsters). I didn't mind having a few extra pounds in my bag if it meant I wasn't going to die if I got lost.

On clothes, I did most of my hiking in a white long sleeve quarter zip shirt made out of some wicking material or another, and a nice light pair of convertable pants. For extra dorkatude, I usually wore a USGI boonie hat (a lighter OD color). Was never not comfortable.

Be smart about it and do your hiking early in the AM or late in the day, take extra water and food, and you'll be fine.

edit: I don't know where you're from, but if you're from a swampy place where heat and humidity are always coupled (like where I grew up), pay really close attention to yourself out there. 90 degrees and humid feels way hotter than 110 and no humidity in the desert, largely because you won't be dripping sweat. "It's dry heat" is not bullshit. So just because you're not sweaty and wilting doesn't mean your body's not hot as hell.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 15:33 on Jun 27, 2013

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Lava Lamp Goddess posted:

Did the four mile Brandywine Falls loop trail today.



You are never more acutely aware of how out of shape you are then when you are going uphill on steep, uneven terrain. And when kids under ten run past you like it's nothing. I miss that endurance.

Thanks for reminding me about that trail. I'm in NEO too and am always looking for good places to hike.

As for the Buckeye Trail, I keep looking at maps of it and it seems to follow lots of rural roads out here and not a lot of woods. Has anyone hiked it near Cleveland/akron?

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Oxford Comma posted:

Has anyone ever sewn straps to a backpack? My Osprey Stratos 36 is awesome. Except if I throw a sleeping bag in, 75% of my space is gone. I'd line to tie it to the bottom of my bag. But there are no straps! :ohdear:
It's been a long time since I've had a pack that required me to lash a sleeping bag to the bottom, and if I remember, it sucks. Really hard to do it in a way that doesn't have it bouncing off your rear end with every step, unless it's an external frame pack where the frame extends well beyond the bottom of the bag and you can lash from the bottom of the frame to the bottom of the backpack.

Have you tried using a compression sack? I can get my down sleeping back down to maybe 3 inches thick by 10 inches around if I compress the poo poo out of it. Goes into the bottom of my pack like an oversized hockey puck.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Moab/Arches is the poo poo. You'll have an awesome time. Watch some old Road Runner cartoons to get yourself prepared for the landscape.

I personally feel the mountain biking is a bit overrated at Moab, at least slickrock trail, but that could be because I'm from a place where the mountain biking is through nice trees and not a ride up a rock and then a dip into the sand repeated a few hundred times. :)

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Save me jeebus posted:

What route and what time of year? There's a big difference between "hourglass in July" and "cables in February".
I tried hourglass in August (2005) and still didn't make the peak because I was stupid and didn't bring any crampons and the little mountain goat part from the hourglass to the peak was still snowy and icy. Probably an abundance of caution, but fuckit, the view from the hourglass was nice enough to not risk a fall.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Business of Ferrets posted:

If you're not careful and don't know the area, you risk winding up somewhere you can't continue and can't retreat, such as a ledge.
Or you could just be careful, know what you're doing, and not wind up somewhere you can't continue and can't retreat.

Never going off-trail seems boring as hell, with the exception of environmentally sensitive areas, of course.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Unless you enjoy having a bunch of bags, think about a liner. My basic setup is a 30 degree bag, a fleece liner and a thin cotton liner. In august, I'm usually OK if I just use both liners, spring and fall I like the cotton liner in the bag so it feels like I'm sleeping on sheets, not nylon, and in winter I'm usually fine with the fleece liner and the bag (and a base layer, and a fleece top, and a hat, and dry socks). Though I haven't slept out in temps below 20 in a long time, so I may be blocking out a night or two of shivering.

All of this is while sleeping on a traditional thermarest. To me, the weight is worth it for waking up without that "I just slept on the ground" feeling.

I also occasionally bring a really lightweight fleece blanket (it's actually just fleece from the fabric store cut to 9'x6') with me for sort of general "I could use a piece of cloth here" use, which gets thrown over me and the other person in the tent too.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


jamal posted:

Getting into biking isn't that bad if you shop the used market and don't need all the newest and fanciest stuff.
I've got a 1213 year old LeMond road bike that was like $2500 new, purchased by me for $1200 used in 2004, and currently worth about $4-500. It was in the beginning of the top tier in it's time, and now can be had for like 2x the price of a schwinn at Target.

It still goes fast and works fine. And frankly, is more bike than I need for the amount that I ride now.

So yeah, don't not ride because you think you need to drop 2 grand. Thinking about my backpacking/hiking stuff, I've probably accumulated 2 grand worth of stuff over the years anyways.

Edit: Having said that, mountain bikes have seen a lot of improvements over the years, and it's getting hard for me to find components for my cantilever-braked, trigger shifted 90s Stumpjumper that is now my city bike. For example, my shifters and brakes are integrated, and I can't upgrade to v brakes because I can't find a decent 7 speed shifter either as a seperate component or integrated into V brake handles, so replacing one component basically means replacing my entire drive train.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 19:03 on Mar 11, 2014

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Joe Videogames posted:

I don't think I'll be able to find any hiking buddies and I'm worried about getting turned around in a trail area and dying from exposure. If I'm not going off to blaze a new trail in the deep woods, do I still run a chance of getting totally lost?

Maybe I don't want to go backpacking/ amount as much as I'd like to hike around an established trail. Is that still considered good outdoorsy fun?

You are way, way, WAY overthinking this. I don't know where you live, but unless it's someplace with a shitton of wilderness, or someplace with godawful weather, go throw a sandwich and some water in a backpack and hit a trail. I would say, and others may disagree, that probably 80% of the trails in this country are so well used that unless you are completely not paying attention, or wander off, or something like that, it's fairly difficult to get lost. Plus, you probably have a phone with a GPS. Don't rely on that to save your life, but again, unless you're in serious backcountry with no signal, google maps will help you find your way back.

If you're really worried, in most places, there are multiuse trails, rail to trail trails, canal towpath trails, etc that are generally like a high school running track. Go take a walk on one of these.

Odds are that there's a hiking club where you live too. I grew up in Buffalo, which isn't exactly an outdoor mecca, and we had an active chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club there with hikes pretty much every day. It's also a great way to learn, because old timers love to pass along the knowledge they've gained over the years.


BaseballPCHiker posted:

Anyone have any suggestions for restoring wet down? My basement flooded and I had my 0 degree down bag stored in a big box so that it wouldnt be all compressed. Of course it got wet and there are baseball sized clumps in the baffles now.

Not sure this is the best answer, but when I had a soaking wet bag, I put in in the dryer with two cans of unused tennis balls. Spun it on low for a while, then air dry for a while, and it came out puffy and dry.

edit: with something that needs as much loft as a 0 degree bag, you may want to find a laundromat with an industrial dryer that is big enough to give the bag room to tumble freely.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 13:39 on Mar 12, 2014

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Elwood P. Dowd posted:

Honestly I could probably get away with a smaller pack but I would rather go slightly large and be able to do longer trips in the future. Thinking Atmos is the way to go. We already have most of our other gear; I just need a sleeping pad and a couple of articles of moisture wicking clothes.

If you only own one pack, this is the way to go. Don't succumb to "hey, I have room for X" like others have said, but it's convenient to have that space sometimes. I've got a 70 liter pack that I almost never fill all the way, so it's nice to be able to do things like put my sleeping pad inside it and things like that.

And in the rare instance you need a bigger pack, you've got the space.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.



I've got a pair of old school scarpa boots like these that I used a lot when I lived out west. They are all leather and leather-lined and after a bitch of a break-in, they feel like slippers now.

But they're heavy, and overkill for light to moderate loads on established trails.

I still wear them for off-trail stuff, but boot tech has gotten so good that I don't think they're really necessary anymore.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


e:f,b

Tricerapowerbottom posted:


1: Camping knife. Go with a HI khukuri? Or a custom made clip tip, about 12' long? I need something that would be most "generally" useful for larger tasks, trimming, chopping, batoning, etc.

That's an. . . interesting choice. Personally, I don't think it's a very useful camping knife at all, even though knife nerds seem to dig the HI khukuris. I think they're more useful for brush clearing and decapitating enemies of the British Empire than for camping use.

If you're going to be doing the kind of camping where you're doing all that to wood, which is generally going to be at an established campground where you're chopping up the wood you bought/brought, you'd be better served with whatever regular pocket knife you want and then a hatchet. I personally love this one: http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-7850-X7-14-Inch-Hatchet/dp/B0002YTO7E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397592393&sr=8-1&keywords=fiskars+hatchet It's light and takes a ton of abuse.


Since I'm editing:

Tricerapowerbottom posted:

3: Tent. I'm looking for a one piece, collapsible, three season tent that will accommodate two adults, two children, and whatever we didn't tie up in a tree. Just something that you can unlatch a few straps, throw it at the ground, and it springs out full size, then throw a few stakes for the rain guard.
Unless I'm taking you overly literally, if you find such a thing, let us know. You're probably looking for a 4 person dome tent. I've got an old as poo poo EMS one that I use for car camping, but there are probably tons out there that would serve you well. No matter what you get, though, that much cloth is pretty heavy.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 20:10 on Apr 15, 2014

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Rime posted:

I loathe MEC and all it stands for, but the 10% off nights really help fill in the gear gaps. :v:
Why do you loathe MEC?

It used to be SUPER useful for Americans to fill gear gaps when our dollar was still worth something vs the CAD.

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stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Rime posted:

What started as a budget friendly place to get quality outdoor gear without daytripping to REI, gear which was made in Vancouver no less, has become a yuppie fashion boutique abusing its co-op status to drive the competition out of business while raising prices. The details are too long to type out on a phone, but they're becoming pretty poo poo in all respects.

Ah, Ok. As you may have gathered from my mentioning the value of the USD, I haven't shopped at one since 2001 or so (my membership card is still laminated cardboard it's so old), and back then they were a good source for relatively inexpensive high-quality stuff, especially climbing gear.

I have one of their giant travel duffels (hockey bag sized) and it was maybe $50 and has survived insane amounts of travel abuse.

Sad to see they have become what so many outfitters have become.

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