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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Work boots are always going to be awful to hike it. If you don't have huge medical problems that completely preclude building ankle strength, trailrunning shoes or lightweight hiking boots are awesome and I'd urge anybody to try them over traditional boots (regardless of being called hiking boots or otherwise)
Taller, thicker, heavier boots do very little for ankle support, and eventually you'll get hurt.


I build hiking and mountain bike trails full time/year round and I wear steel toed leather work boots that are 9" tall because they're safe in terms of chainsaws and swinging tools and 10,000 lb rocks, but that's a particularly specific use.
And I still tweak an ankle sometimes.

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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



stealie72 posted:

While we're on Midwest chat, is there any place decent to backpack in Ohio, preferably in the Northeast of the state? I am assuming there's some good stuff down near the WV/OH border, but I'm looking for somewhere nice to walk for a few hours, spend the night, and walk out. Nothing major, just a little backwoods overnight.

Every place I've lived except here has good trails where overnight backpacking trips are plentiful, but I'm coming up with nothing here. Cleveland has less of an outdoors "scene" than even Buffalo.


There's nothing if you want to stay overnight. Cleveland Metroparks are great and wonderful and everything, but there is nearly nothing worth doing overnight in the whole state until you get way south.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Blister care can be debated, but I personally fall into the camp of fixing the problem the moment you feel a hot spot. Blisters can ruin hikes comically fast, it's better to be preventative. I really like leukotape, but it can be a horridly sticky bitch and some people hate it.
The other important thing (for me) is using something that maintains moisture in my feet, but doesn't let them ever get pruney. Pruney is the worst thing feet can be. I'm still burning through my stock of Hydropel, but HikeGoo is good stuff too (hydropel is no more).


e: For dayhikes and shorter stuff, as well as caring for them after a hike, I usually tape them if it's painful and still gooey, but eventually it'll heal a little and dry out. That's usually good, because the dead skin has to come off sometime.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Ockhams Crowbar posted:

I've noticed a lot of people using those - usually either guys really looking to shave weight, or the guys who pack all sorts of survival widgets into Altoids cans. How are they to use? They don't have a locking mechanism, right?

They're sharp as hell, don't lock and they're a bit less fragile than those snap-off razor blades. Great for gear repair and picking out splinters, which is 99% of what I've ever needed a blade for while backpacking. My dermasafe hangs out in my first aid/gear repair kit and it's the only blade I carry.

There really isn't very much I've ever encountered backpacking that requires the comical number of things on pocket knives or multitools, even on week or longer trips.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



tuyop posted:

It depends, I had to fix a stove once, and my glasses. The pliers and screwdrivers were good for that.

The scissors are nice to have, but not essential, I've used the file quite a bit. The pliers are also great for weird ropework if you do any climbing. I think mine has mostly been used to clean weapons for work, which is kind of hiking.

Basically, your multitool/knife decision should be based on the gear you have available and what might need repairing or... tooling. So I guess since you, Hypnolobster, just cut on yourself and your equipment, that sweet razor blade thing works perfectly! :)


Actually I kind of want one for ultralighting.

Very true, what works for me doesn't work for everyone. I use a laughably minimal stove (alcohol or esbit tablets) and there is nothing that needs to be fixed on it, and that carries through with the rest of my gear (I don't even have any tent poles). I've carried scissors occasionally in addition to a little blade and I actually like having them, I just haven't found a pair I really like enough to bring.

When I'm out with friends, I do tend to bring a Leatherman Squirt PS4, which has some great (but tiny) pliers that have come in handy. Solo, I tend to do a sleep and run sort of thing, but with friends it's much more lazy, lots of time spent in camp and some real tools usually come in handy.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



JAY ZERO SUM GAME posted:

I'm fine with the changes except the "30 day exchange for outlet items." I understand it's all a cash saving move with respect to abusers, and that's fine, but the Outlet one is lovely. I live far away from REI and only go once or twice a year, and use that time to return outlet items that don't fit right/etc., entirely within the spirit of the policy.

The 30 day bit is because they're items they're discontinuing and just want to write off. Lame.

How dare they continue to have an absolutely remarkable and unparalleled return policy compared to nearly every other company in existence.



(you can send returns through the mail too)

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Osprey gave me a new pack when I slid down a hill mountain and tore my Aether 70 to shreds.
Osprey will absolutely just give you a new pack if they can't replace the stay, unless the international service sucks, or the service rep sucks.

http://www.ospreypacks.com/en/web/all_mighty_guarantee

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

I'm leaving to drop my car off at Whitney portal and take YARTS to yosemite valley this saturday and starting the John Muir Trail next monday oh my god I'm so excited!

Ah! I don't get to do that until sept 2014 when I finally have vacation time. I know you generally do, but a trip report is a necessity.

e:

nocratos posted:

I'm planning on going into Yellowstone, Zion, and Glacier National Park. Possibly Yosemite. For those of you who have been there, what are the must see places? I'm fine doing two or three night hikes in the Canadian Rockies but I am a bit concerned about doing something of that length in Zion.

I'd recommend spending the most time in Glacier. Pitamakan pass is probably my favorite spot in Glacier, but you truly cannot go wrong with anywhere in the park.

Angels landing is the necessity in Zion, and dicking around at the bottom of the narrows is fun. We walked into the narrows wearing hiking pants and trailrunning shoes and got about a mile before turning back. Dayhiking Zion is totally doable. We got in early, did lots of wandering around and then slept in a campground and left the next morning.

I post this everytime there's a Zion question:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIKwQR-Itf4

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 19:28 on Jul 12, 2013

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



For people backpacking with a phone for GPS, it's worth noting that the iPhone 5 apparently drains the battery when the sim is locked/things turned off/etc like a sonofabitch. The iPhone 4 (and probably lots of android phones) can be brought all the way down to ~%4 drain while asleep per day.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 23:04 on Aug 26, 2013

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



stealie72 posted:

Thanks for reminding me about that trail. I'm in NEO too and am always looking for good places to hike.

As for the Buckeye Trail, I keep looking at maps of it and it seems to follow lots of rural roads out here and not a lot of woods. Has anyone hiked it near Cleveland/akron?

Buckeye is decent through the Akron section. Medina County section isn't bad either (you can make a decent loop hiking through all of Hinckley Reservation). If you go to Brecksville Reservation, there's a decent section (don't go when it's been raining recently, it's pretty swampy). Way down south it gets reasonably good, but at that point it's not worth driving so far south when you can go to Allegheny in PA instead.

The Buckeye is a cool idea, but it's either going to die out in 15 years, or it will eventually become something worthwhile. I'm guessing it's going to start to die out and continue to be mostly on-road garbage.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 04:47 on Sep 16, 2013

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



I build trails everyday and wear wool socks and boots everyday.

I was a diehard Smartwool fan for a couple years but eventually I started wearing holes in all of them. Switched to Darn Tough and I haven't had any problem at all. Plus when those start to develop holes I can just send them back to Darn Tough and get new ones!

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



The only merino products I don't utterly destroy doing trailwork 40 hours a week are darn tough socks. Shirts and underwear are way too expensive and get ruined far too quickly.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



This is going to make me sound like I'm insane (probably), but I think I've found my favorite backpacking pants.

http://amazon.com/gp/product/B006YFVY1O/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I bought a pair of them for work to wear underneath bib overalls when it started getting cooler out (sweatpants are too warm for fall under bibs, work pants are just too bulky). I build trails professionally, and needed to do a quick walk about 3 miles and back, took off my bibs and just wore the scrub pants so I could move faster, and it was sort of a sun shining through the clouds moment.

I'm not afraid of cotton in the summer/warmer sides of shoulder season, particularly not only %35 cotton, so I'm going to start wearing these for some day hikes and then try them on some backpacking trips next spring and see how they do. They're certainly pretty durable and dry fast, and are ridiculously comfortable.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



CheshireCat posted:

Planning on camping along the shore this Memorial Day weekend. Has anyone used MSR Groundhogs in sand? I'm wondering if they would be enough or if I need to purchase snow/sand anchors.

I used them without a problem in NW Washington on the coast in sand. It was wet, slightly hard sand, though. If there are rocks around to drop on top of the stakes, you'd be fine with groundhogs.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Dirty girl gaiters and trailrunning shoes (or just hiking shoes, there are no trailrunning shoes that fit my wide gently caress feet) is the greatest combo ever. The first time you step into something wet and water gets inside your big heavy goretex hiking boot, you're hosed.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Tashan Dorrsett posted:

I've heard really good things about this little guy too http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...VZ4A4PWCFCFEZX3
$7 for a decent canister stove, can't go wrong there. Probably a whole lot more newbie friendly than a redbull can stove and the price is literally competitive with buying soda.

I use that stove at work during the shoulder seasons. The piezo igniter falls apart fairly fast, but it's otherwise solid. I use it over alcohol because it's fast and easy and it gives me more time lounging in a hammock with hot food during lunch.

For backpacking though, I maintain that alcohol is the way to rock for most people. I don't think that the pressure style stoves (penny stoves, atomic, etc) are good for newbies since knocking them around can make fireballs shoot out, but wick stoves and alcohol pool stoves are awesome. The Zelph Starlyte is seriously one of the best price/performance/ease of use stoves ever.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/starlyte-stove.php I use the regular starlyte with a fairly wide MSR Titan ti pot. Whole kit still comes in well under 6oz.

If I'm feeling stupid light it's down to a heineken pot, esbit tablets and my whole cook kit weighs in at under 3oz.


e: also I agree completely with your whole post. I'm generally between 7-9lbs base pack weight, and the only big expensive things I use are a ZPacks backpack and Enlightened Equipment quilt. The rest of my gear is somewhere between inexpensive and really really cheap.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 22:00 on May 29, 2015

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



It's a mild difference between pointy tips and bigger rubber tips, but you're right.

That said, poking little holes in a trail is a drop in the bucket compared to what just generally walking on a trail does in terms of wear/damage. Your feet are causing more long term problems than poles will regardless of what kind of tip. I build trails for a living and I use rubber tipped poles, for what it's worth.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Officer Sandvich posted:

You will. I've been using a Tarptent Contrail this year and everything about it is fantastic except trying to get into it. Whenever I buy a new tent it'll be something with a side/larger entrance.

This is exactly that. Weights are the same, but it's side entry and a touch bigger feeling. I absolutely love mine.
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/tents/LunarSolo.html

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



BaseballPCHiker posted:

My guide to fighting hells servants on Earth AKA Ticks:

1. Wear long sleeves and pants. Even if it is scorching hot out, long loose fitting clothing can actually make you feel cooler by keeping direct sunlight off of your skin and the ticks would have to get through your clothing to bite you.
2. Use real bug spray. Dont bother with that all natural lemon perfume nonsense. It doesn't have to be %100 DEET but make sure it has some in it and lightly spray yourself.
3. Treat your clothing with Permathin. This may be one of the most helpful steps you can take. Buy a bottle of Permathin, take your clothes outside and put them up on a hanger and spray to treat your hiking clothing. Play extra attention to the ankle and wrist areas of your clothing as this is where the ticks are most likely to try and attach themselves.
4. Check yourself before getting into your pack for the night, get down and dirty and check every part of your body. Make sure one of those little bastards didnt sneak in somehow.

I've heard anecdotal evidence that the peppermint Dr. Bronners can help, I guess it can't hurt and I do use it myself, but I would put more faith in Permathin and long clothing.

To expand on this, if you don't want to use DEET (and you shouldn't use DEET, seriously) you can use picardin based repellents. Combined with clothing properly treated with permethrin you'll very rarely end up with a tick on your skin.

This approach works well for mosquitos, too. Long sleeves, and treated clothing are the trick with those bastards, and using a bug net along with it is really truly worth it. Permethrin won't completely repel them, but it'll keep them off you enough to avoid bites through reasonably loose fitting clothing. The picardin and being completely covered does the rest.

I buy 36% concentrated permethrin and treat my work clothes with it every 2-3 weeks. This whole season of 40 hours a week trailwork so far has yielded only mosquito bites on bare skin, and zero ticks.

and yeah, get a hand mirror and check yourself. Seriously, check everywhere.

e: this is the general method I use for treating my work clothes/hammock/backpacking clothes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3sGvZE3rh4

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 23:59 on Jul 23, 2015

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



gohuskies posted:

I know the 100% DEET is on the strong side, but I use 30% DEET and never had any bad side effects or anything - do folks really think the 30% DEET is that bad as long as your keep it off your face/mouth/eyes?

Nothing utterly definitive, but it's generally shown to be potentially unsafe.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DEET#Effects_on_health
sources, if you want them.

I'd probably still use the stuff if picardin didn't exist, to be honest.

e: to be fair, I'm coming from the place of needing to use a bug repellant 40 hours a week for about 4 months straight at a minimum. DEET as casual weekend use or whatever is probably not really a concern.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



It's just going to tire you out, as long as you can still carry it comfortably.
If it's really horrendous and you can't carry it well, it could cause back problems, and it's going to exacerbate joint pain.


Tomato Soup posted:

Altitude sickness is a bitch. You can be fine one trip but then the next trip, you might come down with a case and need to cut the trip short. One nice thing about it is that you feel better immediately when you get back to lower altitude.

In other news, my EE quilt arrived! :neckbeard:

edit: Starting to have buyer's regret for Copper Spur UL1. It's just so heavy compared to the other way lighter options out there that cost the same or are cheaper. Heck, I could even get something in cuben fiber if I buy used.

I posted this a page ago or so, but I can't recommend this enough
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/tents/LunarSolo.html

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Either buy a really spectacular pad or suffer, essentially. You could get into hammocking too, but that takes a good bit of research/gear/a bit of practice.



I cannot recommend the thermarest EvoLite Plus enough.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



bunnielab posted:

Does anyone here have a Sierra Designs Backcountry Bed sleeping bag? There is one on Massdrop right now and I am thinking of picking it up. I have been looking at them for a while and they seem to be perfect for the way I like to sleep in the hammock. It's a bit heavy but hopefully with a pad I can avoid having to get an under quilt.

That is extremely cool. I really don't need anything else for my sleep system, but I'm tempted to get that for car camping/heavyweight backpacking with friends/etc. Looks incredibly comfortable.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



I highly recommend either EE quilts, but you should also look at the MLD Spirit quilts.
http://www.mountainlaureldesigns.com/shop/product_info.php?cPath=42&products_id=133

I had a 20 degree and 40 degree EE quilt, and I sold both and got a 28 degree Spirit quilt and it's just way, way better than down. No cold spots, it's better in the damp, still stupid light, and it's cheaper than anything comparable with down insulation.


e: I got the xlarge because the weight gain isn't enormous, and I'm picky enough about sleeping comfort that I like having lots of extra quilt to tuck under me, and more than enough length to really get my head covered if I want. At some point in the near future, I'll be getting the 38 as well.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 01:32 on Oct 6, 2015

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



deong posted:

I've only gone a few times. I need to figure out weight poo poo, cuz wtf is this 12lb bag stuff? I think mine comes down to cooking stuff. But I'm at like 30lb.
I really want to get into bikecamping, and everything crosses over except the pack obv.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYDgTV8q5Cw
Cook kits can be hilariously light. That's my setup, and I do all freezer bag cooking so it just needs to boil 12-16oz of water. These days use aluminum flashing for a windscreen and a strip of silicone for a hot pad.

My heavyweight version is a Starlyte stove from Zelph and a 900ml Ti pot, and its still only 6ish oz.

These meals rule
http://andrewskurka.com/section/how-to/food-nutrition/meal-recipes/
and adapt to freezer bag rehydrating well.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Its cool, and its weight is super acceptable for being 4 inches (!!) thick, but it's only 20 wide and not terribly long. There are similar devices for filling inflatable pads, but they're reasonably fiddly/fragile.

That said, it still gets whooped by a Neoair and a pumpsack (even a neoair large, which is the coveted 25" width) which is probably still more comfortable and weighs way less.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



You can't go wrong with Osprey for an ultra durable and endlessly warranty repair/replacement backpack. I slid down a crappy PA mountain years ago on my Aether 70 and tore it basically in half and Osprey sent me a new one. If they could have fixed it instead, they would have.


There isn't really any dud in the lineup, so just pick something the size you want and go for it. The Atmos 50 is probably about right.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Crazyeyes posted:

That is a helluva glowing recommendation.

Might check out the Atmos 65 just because is like to maybe do some longer treks in the future and I couldn't justify buying multiple hiking packs to my girlfriend. I could rationalize it internally, but they expensive.

Can the Atmos be custom fitted like the aethers and ariels?

The custom fit of the Aether isn't really necessary to do. At least with the older version I'm familiar with, it's a heat molded hip belt that just slightly changes it shape (I had my first pack fit, but the replacement wasn't. Didn't really notice a difference).

The new version of the Atmos looks like it has a highly adjustable hip belt instead of the Aether style design.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



I bring vodka in these http://amzn.com/B000XYMYRU dump it in one of my half full water bottles with some Mio, which I always have anyways for the purposes of my necessary consistent caffeine consumption.

I can't drink whiskey without chasing it with beer. It's like concentrated heartburn.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



You've pretty much found all of them. Joe Brewer is/has been my favorite because he's super relaxed and doesn't yell at the camera like Will Wood.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



I do ultralight (so calories/ounce is important to me), and freezer bag cooking. My absolute top priority for backpacking food is that it's ridiculously easy and fatty/carby/salty as hell. I only cook for dinner, and generally not at camp so I prefer it to be fast and easy. I prefer fewer meals over tons of variety for simplicity and always knowing exactly what to expect.

My staples are
-Rice/beans/fritos/cheese (my modifications/thoughts on this)
-Pesto noodles (less basil, throw in Knorr vegetable mix)
-Pad Thai (pretty great as-is)
-Peanut noodles (you can use Taste of Thai peanut sauce mix, as well as powdered peanut butter for convenience)
Any meal I want to try out for the first time I'll usually cook at home a few times to nail down a version I really like and see how it adapts to freezer bags.

Throw in the standard bars, blocks of cheese, summer sausage, chips, PB&J tortillas, misc junk food, etc and I've never felt a need to expand beyond those. The rice and beans is by far my most common meal because it's tasty as hell and I never get bored of it. The other Andrew Skurka meals are good too, but none are quite as great as the rice and beans.
I messed around dehydrating for a while, but it's sort of inconvenient. If I had more of an urge for a big variety I'd do it on a regular basis.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 21:05 on Dec 27, 2015

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Vivian Darkbloom posted:

Does anyone have experience seam sealing a tent? I got a Tarptent ProTrail for xmas and I picked up some sealant for silnylon (Sil Net) which looks right. But there's a conflict between the directions that came with the tent and the ones on the sealant -- the tent says to mix the silicone sealant with paint thinner to use it, while the Sil Net says I can put it on the seams from right out of the tube. Any idea which is preferable?

Tarptent recommends using actual silicone caulk mixed with thinner. I'm not sure how well Sil Net will work, but the trick with the Tarptent method is that it's very liquid, and can be brushed on very thinly and evenly with a foam brush.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuxUcOZYvog

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



I was going to just recommend the One True Spoon
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00J1BV01C

But that Zojirushi spoon looks awesome as hell so I had to find it.
https://www.zojirushi.com/app/spare_parts/item/7-SWF-P050

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Vomik posted:

Lining your pack with a trash bag is AFAIK what everyone does - its definitely better than whatever waterproof top layers they sell for backpacks - great for all your layers etc.. For a sleeping bag though I definitely like an event compression sack

I use trash compactor bags (thick, and not enormous) as a liner, and then I still use a pack cover to keep the outside of the pack reasonably dry, or at least not completely saturated. It's redundant, but the liner only weighs about an ounce.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



If you need dehydrated beans, these are pretty great
http://smile.amazon.com/Santa-Fe-Be...eans+dehydrated
Obviously they're mostly mush, but they rehydrate fast and aren't actually flavored like you'd expect. It's just beans and salt.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Whoever recommended fishing hoodies a page or 3 ago, I love you. I got a Columbia Terminal Tackle hoodie from amazon for $25 in white and it's instantly my favorite garment I own. The sun is instantly less hot with it on, and even the smallest amount of airflow from just moving around cools me down noticeably. I'm a pasty white scottish/nordic person and I burn from the light in the fridge, and this will probably save my life.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



beefnoodle posted:

-Unless they get soaked.
Mylar blankets are pretty firmly into the "overprepared" category. If a down quilt gets soaked, squeeze it out and go to sleep. It'll be warmer and more comfortable than mylar.

Guest2553 posted:

The best kind of legal!

Also, can someone please judge me? I've cut down my base weight down by over half by getting rid of a bunch of dumb poo poo. I'm doing 2-night stays but would like to work my way up to longer trips.

If money were no object I'd get some decent down stuff (UQ, TQ, jacket, hood) instead of questionable synthetic material, as well as a lighter hammock, but that would be more for comfort in greater temperature extremes than weight savings.
Other than what HarryPurvis said, you could drop some weight in the cooking system, but that's a pretty personal thing. I roll with alcohol or esbit, and my whole cook kit is under 5oz total, sometimes under 3 if I'm using esbit. I also do freezer bag cooking, which knocks out all the other weight except one long handled spoon. I'd suggest ditching the wood burner and use just a Ti pot alone with foil for a lid instead of a full lid and folding plate.
Also, what's with the Amsteel cordage?

Depending on the hike, I tend to underpack for extra warmer layers unless It's the shoulder season, and you've got a lot of packed weight in clothes. I don't usually sit around outside of the sleeping bag/quilt when I'm not moving, though.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Ropes4u posted:

Does anyone roll their own freezer bag meals? If so can you post some pro tips and favorite meals.
This is my effortpost from last year about exactly that

Hypnolobster posted:

I do ultralight (so calories/ounce is important to me), and freezer bag cooking. My absolute top priority for backpacking food is that it's ridiculously easy and fatty/carby/salty as hell. I only cook for dinner, and generally not at camp so I prefer it to be fast and easy. I prefer fewer meals over tons of variety for simplicity and always knowing exactly what to expect.

My staples are
-Rice/beans/fritos/cheese (my modifications/thoughts on this)
-Pesto noodles (less basil, throw in Knorr vegetable mix)
-Pad Thai (pretty great as-is)
-Peanut noodles (you can use Taste of Thai peanut sauce mix, as well as powdered peanut butter for convenience)
Any meal I want to try out for the first time I'll usually cook at home a few times to nail down a version I really like and see how it adapts to freezer bags.

Throw in the standard bars, blocks of cheese, summer sausage, chips, PB&J tortillas, misc junk food, etc and I've never felt a need to expand beyond those. The rice and beans is by far my most common meal because it's tasty as hell and I never get bored of it. The other Andrew Skurka meals are good too, but none are quite as great as the rice and beans.
I messed around dehydrating for a while, but it's sort of inconvenient. If I had more of an urge for a big variety I'd do it on a regular basis.
I should mention that I'll occasionally throw in a Mountain House Chili Mac occasionally, because they're cheap on amazon and so goddamned satisfying.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



Pack covers are often worth carrying just because they weigh less than a soaking wet backpack. I use a pack cover and liner too. On a cuben fiber or small UL pack, the weight difference probably swings the other way, but it's still awfully nice digging around the outside of a mostly dry pack at the end of the day instead of a soaked one.

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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any. :(



theroachman posted:

Any chance she'll be carrying an umbrella and pushing a bike stroller full of water?

I get the reference, but umbrellas are insanely great on the trail. I carry a sub 8oz umbrella on almost every trip. Keeps the rain off the upper body and allows perfect airflow, keeps the sun off, covers the foot end of a tarp, etc. It's one of my favorite pieces of gear ever.

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