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a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I love hiking up high. I got some time in RMNP in the summer of 2011.

I bumped in a ranger and his pack llamas by Mount Lady Washington:


That's Long's Peak and the Lamb Slide in the background. Mount Lady Washington is the scary-looking scree slope in the upper right.

I scrambled the ridge of Lady Washington solo up to about 12.5k feet, but the talus got small and slippery, and I decided that retreat was better than pushing up and risking breaking an ankle out of shouting distance of anybody else.

This photo was just below my high point:



I took some video of the scramble. Pardon the goofy-rear end beard. I lost a bet and had to grow it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GM-ft1gWBzk

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a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Also, focus on breathing in through your nose. When it gets below about 10 degrees F here in Michigan, I cough pretty constantly unless I breathe through my nose.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Evans is awesome. I thought the Sawtooth was a fourth class scramble, though?

Anyway, two photos from high up on Evans, summer 2003:

Clouds below:


Kids!

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



That doesn't look too bad. I did Bierstadt one nice morning at the end of July 2011, and I looked at the sawtooth and thought about it for a while. I hit the Bierstadt summit by 9:30 or 10:00, so there would have been plenty of time. I was by myself, though, and didn't want to risk it.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I use that same brand, and it's always been just fine - stays out of the way, and I forget it's there an hour into paddling.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Yeah, that's definitely a hiking boot. You'd know if you'd bought a climbing boot because you'd have spent approximately one billion dollars US on them.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



They're a bit shorter than what you're looking for, but I love the Vasque Breeze boots. Light, good support, and cool. The only thing they really need is a rubber toe cap, which I see they've added on the new model.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I got a tear in my pack when I checked it on a flight a bunch of years ago. Not a big one, so it's just a minor annoyance, but it's there. I've checked the same pack ten or twelve other times, and nothing's happened to it.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Texibus posted:

Does anyone have any experience with trails in Southeast Michigan, that are no more than about a two hour drive outside of Detroit. I'm looking for day hike things, that might be a little more challenging than just walking a well worn trail. I've been to Independence and Bald Mountain in Oakland County, looking for something different from those. Also, any good recommendations of parks that I should go to even if it is well worn trails.

Pinckney and Waterloo State Recreation Areas, just north of 94 in Dexter, have good day-hike and overnight trails. Good swimming holes in the summer, too. I go pretty often, and I know the area well, so let me know if you want to meet up and do some walking.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Lungboy posted:

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

I spent four months in Yosemite, and I never wanted boots. Trail runners are more than sufficient.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I did the Sleeping Bear Dunes hike today, out to Lake Michigan, and drat was that the most strenuous ~4 miles I've ever hiked. The "trail" was just loose sand, and the dunes are incredibly steep. It was worth it for the views, though. I'll get some photos posted as soon as I develop the pictures.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



The REI in one of the northern Detroit suburbs had a canoe on the scratch and dent rack that someone had bought, used for four years, and returned. It was crazy that someone would take a perfectly good boat back to the shop like that, but I guess that's one of the abuses they're talking about.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Ibuprofen. Pain killer and anti-inflammatory. It's crucial for sprains and such.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I'd also recommend going smaller for a day pack. My absolute favorite is this one:

http://www.rei.com/product/796730/osprey-stratos-24-pack

It's plenty of space for just a day, and it's easy to stash whatever size hydration bladder you happen to need. The mesh back is also really awesome - keeps you much cooler. I've had mine for about four years now, and it's been up 14ers, down to the beach, all over the place, and it still looks pretty good.


EDIT:

Menschsein posted:

Thanks for the replies. I wrote to the US customer service and they were very quick and forthcoming, they'll cut the new pieces and send them. Just have to ask whether they'd be able to send the parts to Europe, if not, I'll see if they can send it to a friend in the US, who'll pass it forward. It'll still be cheaper than a new backpack.

Getting the rods into place will be another (hilarious) issue, though.


While you're at it, maybe you can get them to yell at the European customer service people, too?

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



snappo posted:

I wear a regular strap diagonally across my chest, with the camera pointed towards me when I put it on, so that the lens ends up flat against my body. I only put it in the pack for rain or river crossings (Ziploc bag), or for rock scrambling on all fours, bundled in a towel or jacket for padding. Keep it handy, otherwise you'll miss fleeting wildlife/lighting photo ops, or you'll see cool shots and think, "almost worth taking off the pack, but not quite".

For my DSLR, I've got this thing:




It's got space for the body and a medium-length lens - I know a 50 will fit just fine, and an 85 would probably work. I attach it to the waistbelt of my pack, so I don't have to take the pack off to get to the camera, but it's protected in case I need to do any scrambling or banging about.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I picked up a pair of trekking poles yesterday, then did about 6 miles of hilly terrain in SE Michigan. They were really nice, and a fair bit of the hike was near or after dark, so the stability was helpful.

I can't believe I was so disdainful of these things for so long.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



If you leave them out, just stick them in your armpit for ten minutes before you put them in your headlamp. It's cold, but it works.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I've never kept my pack inside my tent. If someone wants to steal my stuff while I'm camping, they're pretty much just going to get it.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



bongwizzard posted:

I like to get a good buzz on and wander around the woods to look at interesting stuff, maybe catch a fish, maybe pet a doggie if I meet one.

You have articulated my life motto in the most compact way possible. I'm probably going to get this tattooed around my bicep.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Fitzy Fitz posted:

None of the local wildlife here (GA) is that dangerous to a person. I do worry about my dog getting into a scuffle with coyotes or hogs, but I don't think a gun would solve that.

If I carried a gun it would be for other people, but I'd probably never actually need it. It's a comfort thing.

It's really long odds of course, but my friend got murdered on a hike on Blood Mountain, up near Helen, about 8 years ago.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Meredith_Emerson

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



The best trail magic is fresh socks and blocks of cheese.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I was thinking maybe a fisher? They're about the right size, at least.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



theHUNGERian posted:

Hey megathread,

I'm a very casual hiker. I've been at 10k feet, one trip even had some snow which I managed just fine, but I've never gone on trips longer than a day. I'm playing with the idea of doing a mountaineering seminar in Denali national park next year. It would be 10 days long. There are many things I need to work out before I can commit to this trip, but at the top of my mind is food. What do people typically eat for 10 days in such a climate?

The seminar should have a packing list, and they'll probably provide food for you.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation




This is the kind of trail I have nightmares about.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Levitate posted:

Now just add snow to it and have a snowfield end in a freezing lake

Snow is less scary than dirt or scree to me, at least so long as the snow is deeper than six inches. It's easier to make solid-feeling steps in.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



fknlo posted:

Hey hiking goons, I need some help with blisters. I moved to Colorado last year and have begun hiking since the weather has gotten nice. My little toes curl under the toe next to them and I've always had some blister problems on the bottom/inside tip of the little toe. I've been doing some basic hikes in the foothills and this old problem is back with a vengeance. I've been wearing Merrel Moab shoes with some heavy wool socks I grabbed from either Costco or REI. I grabbed some toe socks last week as I remember those helping me some when I used to run back in the day. I went for a 5 mile hike again today in the toe socks and they didn't help and I got a new blister that went further back along the inside of the toe than I usually get. So what's my next step? Those little silicone gel sleeves? Different shoes? I'd like to get to where I can do more actual hiking but I'm going to have to get this sorted out before that happens.

I have the same issue, except with my fourth toes. I'd honestly consider just having them removed if a doctor would do it - it's been a huge pain my whole life.

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a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Dangerllama posted:

Your shoes sound like they donít fit. You might try some Superfeet to see if you can adjust the fit a bit (this can help with arch support and toe splay). If youíre just hiking in the front range you might also just think about rocking tennis shoes and see if it helps.

Final option would be to head to a boot fitter.

No, it's a fairly common deformity where the toes actually curl inward and under the adjacent toe. It's bone structure, not shoe fit.

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