Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



The Osprey Daylite is pretty good too, I've used it extensively for day-to-day activities, day hikes and traveling. It can take Osprey's 1.5 liter water pack and folds flat for packing in a suitcase or larger pack.


Speaking of backpacks, I'm looking for a new multi-day pack in the 55-65 liter range to replace my old external frame backpacking pack. Looking in REI both the Osprey Atmos and Aether look close to what I'm interested in, but I'm having difficulty finding similarly sized packs in other brands (like the Gregory Savant or Boreas Lost Coast) at the local stores to try on. Any recommendations?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



BaseballPCHiker posted:

REI dividends came out today. Got a whopping $13! Also Campsaver is running a %20 off one full price item, dont know if that is for people on their email list or store wide. Now seems like a good time to stock up for the summer season.

REI's 20% coupon is supposedly running 28 Mar - 11 Apr, so now's definitely the time to pick up those big ticket items for summer. There should also be an REI Attic Sale around the end of the month as well.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Verman posted:

Got my rei dividend for $70 today.

It's incredible when they show you how much you spent that didn't even apply to your dividend. Dropped $1500 at rei in one year. Christ I need to stay away from that place.

The sad part is that I'm not even sure what to spend my dividend on as I don't really need anything else. I was looking at a new thicker sleeping pad so that might be next.

:eyepop: Although counting my non-REI and non-eligible purchases last year I'm probably not that great either.

You *can* always ask for the dividend in cash if you want.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Elwood P. Dowd posted:

Quick question for goons:

I was at REI yesterday and tried on a variety of packs. My wife has some backpacking experience, having done a few 3-5 day trips in college. We were thinking to start doing some weekend trips this spring, and so were looking in the 60-Liter range. The Osprey packs I tried on were my favorite, the Atmos and the Aether, and they were about in my price range.

The big plus for the Atmos appears to be the Airspeed suspension-- we live in Ohio and it can be fairly hot and humid around here. That all by itself is making me lean towards the Atmos 65. Is there a reason I should lean toward the Aether 60 or even 70? They are a bit more expensive, though they do seem to have more features. Not really sure if I would value those features or not, and I don't really have a feel for the difference in their suspension systems.

I'm in the same boat and have been leaning towards the Atmos as well...the Aether 60 come in at about one lb heavier than the Atmos 65 without a whole lot of extra to justify it. The only real advantages I've found with the Aether is the external hydration pack sleeve and a reinforced hipbelt. The size of the Atmos gives some flexibility towards use for both overnights and multi-day trips while still having a weight (3 lbs ~9 oz) comparable to a lot of ~50L.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



The Osprey Atmos 65 seems pretty popular - by the time I got the the local REI at 1 PM today they were already cleaned out, along with the Exos :v:

At least in store delivery is pretty quick, should have it arrive for pickup by next Thursday.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Dohaeris posted:

So I am new to hiking but recently moved to Colorado. I've been up to the top of Horsetooth Rock and hiked up to Bierstadt lake, among other smaller parks (Pictures if anyone wants them). I got one of those water backpack things which has been great for carrying my meager trail mix/jerky stuff I bring. I also grabbed a small first aid kit and a flashlight, just in case. Hiking has also been great for my weight loss goals thus far.

However, it has been raining quite a bit lately and all I have are decently old tennis shoes. I have weirdly wide feet, are there any decent inexpensive boots I can look for?

Any has anyone been to Estes Park or Horsetooth? I got an annual pass for Estes, would love some recommendations for good hikes for my beginner out of shape fat rear end.

edit: I also tried to do the Emerald/Nymph/Bear lake trail, but did not realize it would still have snow. Threw on a hoodie and tried to do it anyway as the snow was mostly hard packed enough that it didn't matter, but I ended up getting lost after hitting nymph lake and circled back around to Bear. I spent a good ten minutes looking at a sign before picking a direction to head back out and walked ten feet to see I had gone back to the parking lot. That's when I went to Bierstadt, which had less snow, heh. So if there are any snow hiking tricks that don't require crazy special gear that'd be cool too.

I've got pretty wide feet and had a lot of trouble with tight toes on boots. I ended up getting some Keen Targhee boots and absolutely love them. Roomy toes, decent waterproofing and great traction for rocks.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Any recommendations for overnight/3-day backpacking trails in Central PA? I'm going to be in the State College area in a few months and want to check out some of the local trails.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Elwood P. Dowd posted:





Might be a little tricky to see but there's a bedded-down fawn in there. The dogs were none the wiser, proving the wisdom of tiny deers curling up into little balls on the forest floor.


Fawns aren't always that good at choosing hiding spots...

Seconds after the mother took off for the next county, the fawn is still trying to figure out what's going on.


Yes! Follow your mother, she's got a better idea of what to do!


Wait a second...


Oh...oh no. That's...not the best approach :ohdear:


I got the heck out of there as fast as I could. At least I heard the mother crashing around in the woods further down the slope so hopefully she went back. I hope the fawn learned that "sticking your head under a bush" tactic isn't the smartest way to deal with potential predators.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Shrinking Universe posted:


Anyway, photo of where I actually went. I hiked from Honeysuckle Creek, along the Australian Alps Walking Track (probably better known as the Australian Alps Fire Trail...it was mostly pretty easy, albeit steep management road), and then deep into the Orroral Valley. The Valley of a Thousand Kangaroos. And wild dogs who kept me awake.

There is a lot of very cool history in this area. Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station was the one that picked up the video transmission from the moon of Neil Armstrong leaving the Lunar Lander, and the Orroral Valley Tracking Station supported the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, as well as the early Space Shuttle Missions.

It's a shame that both stations were completely pulled down in the 90's, and their dishes moved. I can't help thinking how utterly badass a derelict space tracking station complete with rusting dishes would look in the middle of the wilderness (well, they're actually relatively easily accessible...Honeysuckle Creek is a car-camping site), would certainly make for those great "star trails over an observatory/satellite dish because space, get it?" photos if anything.



You could always hike around ACT and see the original dish at the Canberra Deep Space Complex...

I know someone who got a chance to tour the back areas of the Woomera Range when they were down for some NASA liaison work, and according to them there's still tons of old wreckage, abandoned gantries, and other Cold War relics scattered around. Unfortunately its all still closed to the public, that'd be some amazing stuff to hike around in :sigh: .

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Verman posted:

As a side sleeper I powered through with a thermarest pad for a few trips before I decided to see what else was out there. My shoulders and hips would always be sore in the morning and I rolled off it constantly throughout the night.

I switched to the Big Agnes Insulated Q Core and now I sleep like a dream. It is identical in packed size and weight as my thermarest but its 4" thick vs 1.5-2". The big thing with side sleeping is that too much pressure in one spot (hips and shoulders) would displace the air and you would hit the ground. This pad is so thick that you simply dont. I have actually slept on this pad in the same position start to finish which I can't even do on my bed at home. No more sore hips, no more sore shoulders, no more lower back pain. Completely changed my backpacking game. Blowing it up can be annoying though. My thermarest was a self inflator so it didn't take much to inflate. The big agnes takes a LOT more air than the half foam half air type. I picked up the dry bag/pump which is actually pretty nice and keeps your hot bacteria laden breath out of your pad.

I'll vouch for the Q Cores as well, they're amazingly comfortable and for a pad take up very little room when deflated. That's the first I've heard of Agnes' dry bag/pump though, I looked it up on REI and now I'll definitely have to try one out.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



I vastly prefer cork grips to foam on poles for better grip, comfort, and moisture wicking, but ymmv. Other than that, the only major factor I look for in a pole is the quality of the locking mechanisms, since otherwise you end up having to re-extend the poles throughout your hike.

There's really no need to get anything high-end though. You can usually get a good, durable set of Black Diamonds at REI for $40-60, especially if you time it during a sale.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



lavaca posted:

Elk Mountain is only about 60 miles from Bellingham, so it is likely I'll make it up there sooner or later this summer. Although I own a copy of 103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia, sometimes I feel like it's effectively 33 awesome hikes 150 miles from Vancouver and 70 hikes that require a 4WD vehicle and gain 600 meters in the first 2km of the route.


Anyway, I think my baseline for Internet hiking guides is too high. Washington has http://www.wta.org/, which contains a massive volume of trail descriptions and trip reports for hikes across the state. Many of the trail descriptions come from hiking guides published by the Mountaineers, though you don't get the maps you'd get from buying the actual books. Even trails more than 100 miles from Seattle tend to get decent coverage.

For the places the guide books don't cover, I like to check out http://www.nwhikers.net/. If you've ever wondered where a climbers path leads or what goes on beyond the "end maintained trail" signs at Mt. Rainier, they'll be happy to tell you.

A similar web hiking guide for the East Coast is http://www.hikingupward.com/, which covers Virginia, Maryland, and West Virginia. They're currently expanding their coverage into North Carolina and Pennsylvania as well. When most hiking websites look like they were put together in the late 90s having sortable trail lists and Google Map integration is a godsend.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



joeshmoetogo posted:

Permethrin! On eeeeverything.

Are there any 'portable' (ie could take backpacking) permethrin sprays? Everything I've seen are giant aerosol cans.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



dms666 posted:

In DC this weekend visiting a friend and he suggested hiking Old Rag. Says it is 9 miles on the park site but he mentioned there is a 5-6 mile hike back to the parking lot after you do the loop? Wasn't sure what he was talking about exactly, if anyone has any additional info.

It's an 8-9 mile loop - if you go clockwise from the parking lot it's about ~3.5 miles up some extended rock scrambles to the top and then ~5.5 miles back down along a well-maintained trail and fire road. It's usually pretty packed this time of year so make sure to get there early. It's definitely worth fighting the crowds for, the rock scrambles are a lot of fun and the views are some of the best on the East Coast:


Old Rag peak in February

There's a great overview of the route here:
http://www.hikingupward.com/SNP/OldRag/

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



The 60L Aether or 65L Atmos is plenty big if you're carrying all your own stuff, and if you're sharing a tent you can probably get away with 50L or smaller.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Boris Galerkin posted:

Hey guys, I have a 3 day weekend coming up this week and I kinda just want to disappear somewhere and enjoy myself in solitude, especially with the weather cooling off. I have no camping/hiking gear except for a pair of trail running shoes. Would it be possible to get geared up for a 2 night hike/camp somewhere under say $500? I'd prefer REI if possible cause I bought into their membership already. Thinking of heading out Friday morning and spending Friday and Saturday night, and then coming back sometime Sunday.

e: I do have a thin marmot fleece and wool socks.

If you're just solo-ing it then the REI Passage 1 is pretty good for the price:
http://www.rei.com/item/827809/rei-passage-1-tent

Would still need a sleeping bag and pad at a minimum, along with a small stove for hot meals. $500 should be doable.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Levitate posted:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_flour

Basically just ground up rock and minerals from glacial activity. It's why lakes near glaciers often look so stunningly aquamarine. Lake Louise in Banff is a good example (random google image)



On the opposite end of the spectrum is this:



Blackwater is just tannins and decaying plant matter, so while it looks like toxic cola its generally safe to drink. The tannins and leaf bits taste disgusting though so you really need a filter to make it palatable.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



They may not be as big as the mountains out west, but the Appalachians get awful pretty in the fall (Mount Rogers VA last weekend):











Five hour drive to get there and worth every minute. If you're in the mid-Atlantic looking for an overnight trip now's the time of year to head there.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



single-mode fiber posted:

The highlands in Grayson County usually hit their peak foliage beginning October 20th; I took these last year on the 25th

Based on the pictures you took, it might be a little earlier this year, maybe beginning the 17th or 18th.

A little later in September but close enough...I was surprised by the amount of color already out at that point. Those are some great pics, I'd like to try going up in the wintertime with snow on the ground at some point.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



OMFG PTSD LOL PBUH posted:

Their three person tent is 19 loving pounds :stare:

15 pounds for the 2 person.

Those tents weigh around what my fully loaded pack minus water and food weighs.

:stare:

Those aren't... Light or cheap. What is their upside?


"This portable treehouse deploys between three trees via three included 2.5 ton webbing straps equipped with heavy duty locking ratchets for a secure set up."

So effectively in addition to your expensive four-season tent, you also get to lug enough towing straps to haul a deuce and a half out of a ditch.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.







Spring's breaking out in the Shenandoah NP, with bloodroots starting to blossom last week (from Corbin Cabin Trail). This weekend's supposed to be amazing weather and should start seeing a lot more stuff greening and blooming in the park. Great time to get some spring hiking in.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



cheese posted:

Its time to stop bumming a gear setup for this summer. I'm a side sleeping 6'2"/220lbs and looking for an inflatable pad. The reviews all seem to point me towards either the Neoair Xtherm or the Big Anges Q Core SL. This thread seems to love them both, so a couple of questions.
1) Is the noise of the Xtherm really an issue?
2) Is the extra weight of the Big Agnes worth the jump to 3.5 inches or will I be fine with the 2.5 of the Xtherm?

I'd like to buy one tonight with the 20% off REI members coupon, send help!

I honestly haven't had a bad night's sleep with the Agnes Q Core. It might be slightly heavier but there's nothing worth more than a good night's sleep on the trail.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



COOL CORN posted:

I live in the central North Carolina area, but I guess if I want to find some good stuff I'll have to travel to Asheville/Appalachia

Don't know if this falls into your touristy hikes category, but there's a good regional hike site for Virginia that has been steadily expanding into North Carolina recently:

http://www.hikingupward.com/

The hikes in the VA/WV area are legit, can't vouch for NC as it's a bit out of my range.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



COOL CORN posted:

I wonder how much of a bump the PCT (and the AT and other thru-hikes) is going to have this summer since Wild came out in December. I know Alaska had a bump in backpackers after Into the Wild came out, and Reese Witherspoon is more of a "popular" actress, so I'm sure a lot of people saw Wild.

It's definitely a concern for the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, especially since there's a Walk in the Woods movie coming out later this summer. One of the guys in my trail crew is a member of the ATC 'Walk in the Woods' committee, which tries to address sudden surges in trail popularity when bestsellers or movies come out. The popularity of Wild and Walk in the Woods means that people were already starting out on the AT from Georgia in early Dec this season to beat the crowds. It's that double edged sword of wanting more people to get into hiking and the outdoors, but not wanting hordes of new people to abuse the wilderness areas by dumping trash and tearing up the trails. He was down in Georgia this spring monitoring the 'official' thru hike kickoff and compiling reports for the ATC leadership council (including that sword-carrying hiker mentioned earlier :stare: ).

There's apparently a lot of controversy swirling in the AT community over how best to handle the situation. One problem they're having is that people are automatically gravitating to the AT or PCT as they're 1) featured prominently in the books and movies, 2) are probably the only major trail system the general public is aware of outside the big National Parks. The ATC has been trying to mitigate the impact by convincing folks to go to alternate trails (like the Benton Mackay Trail), but in his words "you can't pay people to stay away from the AT."

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Rime posted:



This will be the hike of a lifetime. :stare:

Better be a pretty drat amazing hike to be worth going to Nagorno Karabakh. Was the Iranian border booked up this year?

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Good Dog posted:

The girlfriend and I are going to be in San Francisco for the weekend and were interested in getting a hike in one of the days, anyone have any recommendations on fun/cool day hikes that can be done in the area? We won't have access to a car so anything we do would have been be accessed via walking or bus/train. It looks like the 76x is the bus we want to take, as it puts us wherever we want along golden gate park. Any must sees? Looking at yelp reviews for hiking stuff, it looks like the Marin Headlands are the most popular thing to do.

I was going to say Muir Woods/Mt Tam, but that's a bit too far out if you don't have a vehicle.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Jumping on the trip report bandwagon - finally made it up to Dolly Sods for the first time this weekend, and it definitely lived up to the hype. It was a bit odd to see spring just now arriving at ~4,000 feet, but otherwise the weather was perfect.























The mud totally lived up to its reputation as well.

Definitely check it out if you haven't already and live in the Midatlantic area. Even doing +20 miles over two days I only managed to see about half of the Wilderness Area if that.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



OSU_Matthew posted:

Great pics! If you don't mind me asking, which trail did you take?

I'm heading down there in a few weeks with some buddies and just starting to plan things out, and would appreciate any suggestions!



Started at Blackbird Knob parking (yellow star) and did the black route, which came out to be about 20-22 miles total. Originally I only planned to hike down to the Forks of Red Creek on the first day, but I got there early and decided to go all the way down to Lion's Head to kill time. The view from Lion's Head is nice, but the trail is an old railroad bed that gets rougher the further south you go. For the distance you go I'm not sure it's worth it unless you want to see everything.

Hiked back up and camped on the Blackbird Knob trail at the blue star overnight - that's this spot here and I highly recommend it:



The second day was the loop around the northern end of the park and it was non-stop phenomenal views. Definitely recommend Rocky Ridge and Raven Ridge trails (the western and northern edges of the park). Upper Red Creek Trail (#509) was pretty boggy but between that and Dobbin Grade there's no way you're going to avoid the mud. Based on my experience the northern half of the Sods is far superior, the southern half is nice but nothing you won't see elsewhere in the Appalachians.

I'll actually be writing up the trail directions (minus Lion's Head) for a local hiking website, but they probably won't be posted for a month or two. They've got two Dolly Sods routes up already that give pretty good directions though:

http://www.hikingupward.com/MNF/DollySodsLionsHead/
http://www.hikingupward.com/MNF/DollySodsNorth/

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Ended up enjoying the last bit of spring weather to try out some new trails:


A couple of patches of Lady's Slippers were out and blooming.


Some spectacular weather at Bear Church Rock.


The return leg along Staunton River...really a creek at that point.

It's also trailwork season - spent a Saturday building and rehabilitating over 100 feet of drains, as well as reconstructing a couple of waterbars:



Remember, trails don't build themselves! Helping out with the local trail club is a great way to give back to the community (as well as a great way to enjoy beer around the campfire after a hard day's work).

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



OSU_Matthew posted:

:magical:

I really wish I lived further out West... that is spectacular!

Doesn't even remotely hold a candle to that kind of scenery, but I went out to Dolly Sods the other week, and it was everything I had hoped it'd be. Best part was rolling up to a tiny gas station/gun store way out in the boonies, and picking up a strawberry rhubarb pie at the bake sale out front. I don't think I've ever seen a pie disappear so fast as that night at camp.


Looks quite a bit different with the leaves out, glad to hear it lived up to your expectations!

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Anyone have recommendations for water flavoring/additives on the trail? I'm going to be doing a 9-day desert trek in a few months and I've found in the past that I start craving lemonade or fruit juice after a couple days on the trail with nothing but water. I figure since I'll doubly need to stay hydrated in the desert I should bring some flavoring along for the water, but I'd rather not end up with something that tastes like cheap sugar powder.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Thanks for the water flavoring recc's. Sounds like drops are the way to go, especially since I'm just looking for something to make the water a little more palatable after a couple days on the trail. I'll see what the local store stocks and try out a few before the trip.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



bunnielab posted:

I live in Maryland, east of DC. I am willing to drive a day or so each way to go somewhere cool, especially if the trail is conducive to fishing. My hiking buddy is getting into birdwatching so we can stretch a 6 mile trail into an entire day if I can fish and he can bird.

There's plenty of good streams with fishing up in the Shenandoah National Park and further west in the Massanutten and WV, all within a day's drive of MD. Couple standouts off the top of my head:

- Thorton River/Buck Hollow (SNP)
- Hazel River (SNP)
- Staunton River (SNP)
- Forks of Red Creek (Dolly Sods, WV)
- Otter Creek (WV)
- Cranberry Wilderness (WV)
- Seneca Creek (WV)

West Virginia's probably pushing into overnight/multi-day trips from eastern Maryland, but it's got some of the best streams and river valleys on the mid-Atlantic and definitely worth the extra effort.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Yeah, suction can dislodge the blood clot and lead to dry socket, which is a ~bad thing~. Squirting or pouring the water in your mouth to drink is no problem though.

Otherwise you should be good to go!

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Verman posted:

Look at the big agnes insulated q core. I'm the same way, side sleeper with difficulty sleeping on thin pads.

This pad changed the game for me. I was nervous about the durability of inflatables but it's been fine.

I'll add to the recommendation - just spent the last five weeks sleeping on one in various crappy lodgings and it's been a literal lifesaver. I'll be taking it with me on the trail day after tomorrow for nine days of backpacking, definitely worth the added weight IMO.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Managed to knock off a bucket list item with a 9 day trek through the Outback along the Larapinta Trail. Completed about half of the full 223 km length with a couple hops between sections to hit the highlights, although in hindsight I would have done the entire length if I'd had the time.

Views from Reveal Saddle




The Heavitree Range from Brinkley Ridge


Nightfall at Standley Chasm


Passing through Ormiston Gorge




+450m year old fossilized waves on top of the mountain range


Near Counts Point with three of the Northern Territory's highest mountains (Sonder, Zeil, and Giles) in the distance


Sunset along the Finke River watershed


Inarlanga Pass


Sunrise on Mount Sonder






For a trail that was only completed in 2002 I thought the track conditions and facilities were top notch. There was a surprising amount of diversity along the route between the canyons, ridgelines, dry riverbeds and open plains, and for the middle of the winter dry season there was a good amount of vegetation and wildlife out and about. Definitely recommend it to anyone out in that part of the world looking to see the Australian wilderness up close.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



OSU_Matthew posted:

^^This is exactly why this is my favorite thread--you guys hike the most incredible places


:eyepop:

Great, you've scratched one item off your bucket list and shuffled it straight onto mine!

How did you deal with water? Did you pack it all in, or were there places to refill or treat as you go?

The trail's broken up into 12 Sections with huts/water tanks between each Section:



The longest section between water sources is 30 km or ~18 miles, which makes for a long day's hike. We were carrying about 3.5 to 4.5 L each day between stops with a 4x4 troopie to skip between some of the sections and haul gear.

In addition, a couple sections have year-round water holes that you can use to top up.



Edit - some you can even go swimming in oh God it was cold!

Terrifying Effigies fucked around with this message at 21:33 on Aug 17, 2015

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Question for PA hiking goons - what are the must-see hikes in central Pennsylvania? I'm going to have a week in State College coming up at the end of September with some free time for hiking, wanted to make sure I hit the high points in the area (up to 1-1.5 hours away).



Suicide Watch posted:

Hey guys, I want your opinion: night hiking in the northeast in a state park where black bears are known to roam, what's the line between crazy and reckless?

I've never heard of black bears messing with an active human at night, I would be more concerned with whether you're familiar with the trail your taking or if the night hike is the first time you'll be on it. If you don't know where you're going it can be extremely easy to accidentally wander off the trail in the dark and it can be a real pain trying to find your way back on with a headlamp. I would only go night hiking on a trail I've previously been on and already knew the route.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



Why do the Rockies have to be so amazing? Goddam.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



prezbuluskey posted:

Anyone spend a night or two at Shenandoah NP? I plan on going this weekend and was looking to do 15~ miles and camp out. I was thinking doing old rag or hawksbill, anyone have any specific hikes theyve done?

One SNP out and back that I like is parking at Compton (Mile ~10 on Skyline Drive) and hiking down the AT along Mount Marshall to camp near Gravel Springs Hut, then return on Bluff Trail to Compton the next day. There are some great views along the top of Marshall and the trail is nice and easy on the feet while still giving you a good distance (~10 miles out from Compton, ~8 miles if you park at Jenkins Gap instead).

Other options - Jeremy's Run with a night at/near Mathews Arm, White Oak/Cedar Run or Three Falls with a night at Rock Spring Hut.

Old Rag is going to be jammed packed this weekend and it's hard to find a campsite that's away from the trail and crowds there.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply