Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Business of Ferrets posted:

There is no harm in trying on a wide range of models. Fit is most important, so if you find something comfortable that meets your other requirements, you'll probably be fine. One thing I will say is that, in my experience interacting with the special operations forces in Iraq, units and individuals who had the option of using non-standard-issue footwear frequently did so. I'm sure there are some excellent military-approved boots out there, but in general it seems that the average civilian backpacker is a more demanding consumer than the military is.

The military boots are more or les specified on an average by people who will not be making forced marches in them.

Try everything you can..

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Any reason I should use a camelbak fourteener for day hikes, specifically pikes peak next weekend?

I would also like recommendations for a water purifier, light, as cheap as possible, and capable of filling bladders. We have purification pills already but I was thinking about a pump or squeeze bag purifier.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



beefnoodle posted:

I used to take a Katadyn pump on backcountry dayhikes/overnights, but now just use Aquamira drops. Is there a compelling reason why you want to pump? Alternatively, I'd recommend a Platypus gravity setup.

I thought a pump would be best to refill the bladders for five people and avoid the bad taste of pills/drops.

I am headed to REI tomorrow to see if I like one of the below packs. Am i missing anything obvious, we will probably only day hike:

1. Camelbak fourteener, my wife loves hers but she cheap and wouldn't change packs unless it died.
2. Osprey stratos 26
3. Deuter Futura 26
4. Deuter ACT Trail 24

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Shnooks posted:

I'm new to hiking and camping and was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for books that are like, "Camping and hiking for dummies!" that they might recommend?

Never in my life did I ever want to go hiking or camping until recently. I've done some camping with Girl Scouts growing up and hated it. I want to do an overnight camping trip in Maine but I'm not sure I'd know the first thing about what to bring and pack, and I like to have a physical book in front of me when I'm leaning something new.

You might want to look for a group of people to go with.

http://www.backpacking.net/beginner.html

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Im sure the suspense is ing everyone;

I spent a couple hours walking around REI with a variety of day packs on to which would work out for my intended purposes. Ended up buying an Osprey Stratos and a 3 liter bladder.

Edit: wavering on returning it for the 26 after packing it with my chosen load out.

What do you carry for first aid? More to the point should I cut the gauze and trauma bandage to save room?

Ropes4u fucked around with this message at 23:27 on Jul 7, 2013

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Speleothing posted:

What other stuff are you bringing along for a day hike? You should have plenty of room in a 20ish liter pack for a prepackaged first aid kit.
Let's go over the basics: Water, snacks, raincoat, warm shirt, headlamp, first aid kit.
Bonus items: sunscreen (instead of leaving it in the car, not instead of none at all, doofus), plant ID book, gloves, spare socks, victory beers.


Edit: in my (prepackaged) kit I've got; athletic tape, bandaids, steril pads, ace bandage, scisors, antiseptic swabs, moleskin, and a small selection of pain pills. There's some other stuff in there, but I've never used it - and most of the stuff I've only ever used when we were at camp and I could have had a much larger kit in the car. Sometimes I store my iodine pills in it, and I usually keep a spork in it as well.

Patagucci nano puff
Rain jacket
Zipped off pant legs
Extra socks
First aid - basic adventure pack plus a trauma bandage and compression gauze
Epi pen - wife is allergic to bees
Short length of thin line - 6mm
E-blanket
Bladder
Water filter
Fire kit
Binoculars
Camera
Compass
Headlamp
Sun screen
Bug repellent
Wet wipes
Food - peanut butter sandwiches - power bar - trail mix or dried fruit - drink mix

I understand the trail to piles peak will be busy but this will not , I hope, be the last 14er we tackle and I would like to sort out my setup. I'm with four people (22-37) who have little experience in the mountains and would prefer to be over prepared.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



alnilam posted:

Medkit chat!

Iodine wipes


Might add those I have splints but decided against them. I love my space blankets like no other blanket, but I do have a couple trash bags to add to the load.

Speleothing posted:

Keep the camera & binocs out of the pack & ready-to-use. The group only needs one of most of what you're carrying.

You're hiking with friends, not guiding an them. Make them do some of the work.

Camera and Binocs will be in my waist pockets. I was hesitant to split up the stuff because I "stupid ego, man related excuse here" but will do so before we go.

Good advice on carrying two epi pens,


swimgus posted:

Pike's Peak is seriously long for a day hike, at least the trail I took, Barr trail, I think. I think it was 25 miles round trip. Your list of stuff should get you there and back, but I think if I went up that mountain again, I'd do it as an overnight trip. I remember that as a really long and brutal hike. Good luck.

We are taking the train back to the bottom.

I have been taking first aid courses for work and the military since the 80's but if the wife wants to keep peak bagging or hiking after this trip a modern wilderness course is a must for us both.

Thanks!

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Speleothing posted:

On the contrary WFA isn't really that much better than a standard First Aid course. Your current training is probably just as good, if you've kept it up-to-date.
Wilderness First Responder is where the specialist training starts.

If there is a WFR class nearby (colorado) I'm in for the experience.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



The more I think a out it the more I think a WFA or WFR class would be good. My wife has t had any training, but he k laws everything :), and most of today's first aid is geared towards - an ambulance or medivac is on the way.

Any suggestions for the Denver eastern colorado area?

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009




Nice, think we will start with the three day course. Though I admit that two weeks in boulder sounds fun..

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



BeefofAges posted:

You could do the Narrows in Zion. I think it's a two-day hike if you do the whole thing.

This place is heaven.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Piles peak handed us our rear end, more specifically the weather. Our party was slow which I expected but we were doing okay.

Then the storms rolled over the top, funnel cloud, lightning, hail and rain. Two other parties turned back while we were waiting out the storm in the A frame, both suggested we bail.l, but we waited another 40 minutes.

22 miles the last 11 it rained to add to our defeat. But I feel we did the right thing by bailing.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



I'm an idiot ..

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Verman posted:

What the gently caress? I hope you pooped your pants because that would have been completely acceptable.

Between that and the lightning I was pretty nervous (scared).

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



My wife sounds open to some multi day trips. I need a new tent but would like to spend as little as possible.

For the budget minded hiker is something along the lines of a kelty salida 2 good enough?

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Anyone ever sew their own tent? I was thinking this would be a fun, cheap project.

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/jones-tent2/jonestent2.pdf

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



I bought a sayer squeeze filter and can say that I love it.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



mastershakeman posted:

On that note, I laugh every time I look at my picture from Zion when I got into camping again. I've upgraded almost every piece of gear I have (except the pack itself) but I still had my best national park experience carrying this (I'm on the left)



Zion is heaven on earth you could have packed two Walmart sacks and had fun.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Picnic Princess posted:

Maps rule. I have stacks and stacks of maps that I always study before I do anything new. I like to be able to name mountains as we go. Sometimes I go onto a government site and check out the geology maps to see if I'm getting into any interesting rocks or fossil-heavy beds, and also so I can tell my buddies on the trail: "This shale is approximately 70 million years old. Isn't that loving cool?".

I also just completed my minor in geography, which should tell you: I loving LOVE maps!

On a side note, my friend has now decided she wants me to take her backpacking in Waterton/Glacier. There's a really high chance we're going to see some bears. I hope we do, even though she is super afraid of bears. But then she'll get to learn that black bears are no scarier than a big dog, really.

Send me her address I will forward her a copy of "night of the grizzlies" for her to read before you go :)

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Josh Lyman posted:

Is it waste of money for me to look into $100 technical fleece jackets as an city dweller sitting around in cold weather? As far as I can tell, the Patagonia R4 is my warmest option: windproof, 13.5 oz fleece, and mesh lining to reduce static electricity buildup.

It was 80 in colorado today, but minus 2209 degrees in the office, and I rocked my bright orange Patagucci nano puff like I was on everest...so I vote not its not a waste.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Anyone use a snugpak bag for hiking?

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Kidney Stone posted:

Are you talking about a sleeping bag?

If it is the sleeping bag, then yes, I use form time to time, a Snugpak Travelpak 1

http://www.snugpak.com/outdoor/sleeping-bags/1-season/travelpak-1

And it's ok - nothing special, but it packs extremely small (18 x 15cm), and is quite light weight (850 g). So, if you can find it, I would recommend that you get it.

Perfect, I was attracts by the small size.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



omgmofohomolol posted:

chiller miniature dachshund

Now I need to take my wiener dog hiking

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Patagonia 50% off sale is happening now, if you need a gear go now.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Can anyone recommend a trail in Estes park that won't be packed with tourists.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



beefnoodle posted:

This is probably too late if you were looking for somewhere to go yesterday, but head down Hwy 7 to Wild Basin. Some great hikes with water features there.

Thank you to everyone for chiming in, headed there this weekend. :)

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Edit:

We decided to hit up Lion Lake via Wild basin trailhead tomorrow - should be a blast now that the tourist season is winding down.

Ropes4u fucked around with this message at 18:14 on Sep 3, 2013

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Verman posted:

Hit the Boulder-Grand Pass just off the Thunder Lake campsites if you have time. It leads you to a nice scramble up the pass and an amazing view of both sides of the park.

Thanks we should have plenty of time! I just got notified I might be sent to Florida for six weeks, so this could be the last trip until October. Probably will not prepared for much winter action outside of the ski zones :oI

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Wild basin was flipping awesome. - Thunder lake

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



A few more iphone pics








Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Lacrosse posted:

How many of you carry shelter with you when you day hike? I was reading up on what to bring with me to go hiking at Mt Rainier National Park, and their website recommended a shelter as one of the 10 essentials you should bring. This make sense, since the weather can take a turn for the worst really quickly on the side of a mountain. I got an 8x10 tarp, painter's drop cloth, tent stakes, and guy wire in case I run into trouble. I also have a wire saw for making a lean-to if I need to.

I hike solo, so I've put together a whole survival pack to take with me when I go hiking. I also picked up a can of pepper spray in case someone tries to assault me. There's been attempted rape of lone hiking women on trail around here over the last few years, so I'm kinda paranoid. Has anyone ever been attacked by another hiker before? Most the people I run into seem pretty cool but it always is there in the back of my mind every time I pass someone.

My wife and i carry heat blankets (free at marathons), trash bags, line, food, and a trauma / first aid kit on every hike.

We see other hikers with nothing but an iPod and water bottle so pick your comfort level.

We need to add bear spray..

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



yellowjournalism posted:

What headlamps (and flashlights) do you guys use? I'm looking at Fenix lights right now but also hear good stuff about Zebralight, though they don't offer models as cheap as some of the Fenixes.

I could've sworn there was a flashlight thread somewhere, possibly on TFR, but I can't find it any more.

I have a fenix it's functional but I think its a bit heavier than the TIKKA XP I use at work.

My flashlight is a foursevens mini AA, bright, simple and cheap.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Gambl0r posted:

I finally got around to posting some photos from various Adirondack (Upstate NY) high peak hikes from this summer:






I'm jealous of you guys out west that have dozens of crazy-looking, tall, rocky mountains to hike... but I guess our short green mountains are ok, too.

Third photo is fantastic.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Nifty posted:

Colorado goons! Can anyone recommend a good overnight backpacking route in RMNP for me, with a permit still available or walk-up permits the day of? I am going to Denver for a work week and would like to stay the weekend checking out the park.

I guess around 8 miles per day? Don't really care.. I can certainly handle longer as well. And epic majestic views are a plus, this is my first time in Colorado.

I would hike to lion or thunder lake in wild basin. We just returned for a day hike there and it's incredible.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



I like Patagonia base layers...

A temporary assignment in west palm beach until November has killed my plans to return to wild basin :o|

We will use the time to run, ride and save and shop for new backpacks and sleeping bags.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Nifty posted:

See above question! I got recommendations before, but due to the flooding, RMNP is basically completed closed through this week. Anyone else able to recommend a good overnight backpacking spot for this weekend that I can reasonably drive to from Denver?

Might call the ranger station down south and see if pikes peak area is open.

Colorado is a flipping mess right now. Where we love there is no sewer or drinking water for 7-10 more days. Being in Florida for work is even more awesome now!

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



M.C. McMic posted:

This looks kind of fun: http://www.trimbleoutdoors.com/Maps/EmbeddedMap.aspx?tripId=8572&w=800&h=800&b=1

So, if not Big Bend, what's a backpacking destination in or around TX? My wife and I live in Austin, and we're looking for something other than a day hike.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouachita_National_Recreation_Trail

Ouachita National Recreation Trail is a 223-mile (359 km) long, continuous hiking trail through the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas. Approximately 177 miles of the trail is in Arkansas and 46 miles of the trail is in Oklahoma. The trail is primarily a hiking and backpacking trail, but about 2/3 of the trail are available to mountain bikers. Segments opened to mountain bikes are from the western terminus of the Ouachita Trail at Talimena State Park to the Big Cedar trailhead on US Highway 259 at approximately Mile Marker (MM) 30.5 in Oklahoma, and from the Talimena Scenic Drive Trailhead at MM 54.1, east to AR State Hwy. 7 at mile 160.4, north of Jessieville, Arkansas.

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Picnic Princess posted:

Oh man, you guys, I am so excited. I just got confirmation on my first program expedition and I'm going backpacking, hiking, mountain biking, and canoeing in the Moab area for 14 days in May! This is going to be so badass. My school loving rules.

May I ask what school?

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



marsisol posted:

Does anyone have the Sawyer Squeeze? I've been thinking about picking one up. Seems like a pretty neat system for 1-2 people.

We love ours, fast, easy, and trouble free. It is worth noting that we have only been day hiking with it but we will use it for overnights this year.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Ropes4u
May 2, 2009



Fitzy Fitz posted:

Anyone have some advice for taking a dog backpacking? I can take care of myself and my girlfriend just fine but I've never taken a dog out before.

Bury the poo or keep it off the trail, make a dog specific first aid kit (superglue) and make sure they have lots of water

Edit: I leave my dogs at home because the wiener dog is slow, the bulldog old and the coonhound would bay every animal in the woods.

Ropes4u fucked around with this message at 00:36 on Mar 5, 2014

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply