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Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


jb7 posted:

Looks like someone has never stumbled upon a meth lab or a grow op in the great outdoors.

If this is something people are actually worried about sticking to established trails will be much safer than carrying a gun and going into the back country.

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Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


n8r posted:

Verman: Look into doing a hike in the Pasayten wilderness / cathedral lakes if you are willing to go to WA.

I was going to suggest this, it's directly east of North Cascades NP. If you go for a multiday trip you can be pretty much alone in parts of the Pasayten and it's really beautiful. The rain can dump, but that can be said for anywhere in the Cascades or Olympics.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

To those that recommended pasayten wilderness in Washington, I was reading about the bear situation and it seems to have a pretty decent population of black bears and a few browns. Do you guys carry bear spray in those parts? I don't usually carry it in Colorado but there also weren't brown bears. I don't mind pitching in $50 for some bear spray if it's common up there but if not then that's money I don't need to spend.

Also what would be the best way of getting to cathedral lakes? It looks like taking 20 to methow to NF 5160 to 100?

I don't carry bear spray. The Pacific Northwest Trail goes through the area too, most hikers carry bear spray through Montana and Idaho but mail it home when they get to Washington. The black bears in the North Cascades will most likely keep their distance, and seeing a brown bear would be newsworthy.

As for getting to Cathedral Lakes I went through Horseshoe Basin starting at the Iron Gate trailhead. The fastest way to that trailhead is I-90 to 97, then though Loomis to the forest service roads (detailed directions here), which looks mostly the same as your route except not turning off at 20. That's probably a 6-7 hour drive from the airport and I know you're on a tight schedule. I've only ever hiked into the area from the eastern side, I don't know what access from the south is like or the condition of 5160 or 100 (we have some awful forest roads here).

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

Would there be any reason to choose Pasayten Wilderness versus North Cascades NP and vice versa?

You mentioned solitude in your first post and you'll definitely be more alone in the Pasayten. You also mentioned having new people along, I don't know if that means just new to your group or new to hiking. A lot of the loops through the Pasayten are relatively flat and you could still make great time if someone was dragging. There are lots of opportunities for side trips up smaller mountains with amazing views of the area and of the Cascades, and another popular side trip is going up to the clearcut strip along the Canadian border.


Verman posted:

NC seems to be a little more lush and tucked into more snowcapped mountains whereas Pasayten is less "peaky" and possibly a little drier?

This is pretty much right. I haven't backpacked in NC NP, just day hikes. You'd have to go to the guidebooks or website for the different routes, I know some people who did a really long trip that went in and out of NC NP but I don't know much about it.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


My dad took my brother and me on a rafting trip down the Rogue River once and one of the campsites had a battery-powered fence set up for food, we saw a bunch of bears across the river that night but the guides just kept the food on the rafts. We did convince my little brother to shock himself on the fence though

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I heard from someone in Colville that it was really smoky there for awhile but the winds have changed and most smoke is going to the southeast. Unless the fire gets a lot bigger you probably won't be hiking in any serious smoke but there will be haze that'll diminish views, especially to the east. There's also apparently a new fire on Middle Mountain but that looks well east of where you'll be and probably won't be big.

You really can't do much but play it by ear I guess, it'll be easier to tell in a week.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I have bad knees and poles truly help on descents.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

"nature is gay"

"ITS ART NOT VANDALISM, I AM AN ARTIST"

"if banksy did it ud have a hardon"

"New Plans

"I think I am going to start painting gravestones next for a little less controversy."



These are all taken directly from her blog. I hate this girl. I sort of wish she had been painting the inside of a bear den instead.

It looks like someone either hacked it or snatched the URL after she deleted it. I really doubt that's her.

Also,

Smoove J posted:

Hiking & Backpacking Megathread: nature is gay

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I'm not familiar with the Colorado card but in reading the FAQ it seems the Colorado card is more of a voluntary contribution to the rescue fund? It doesn't seem like the person being rescued is regularly billed in Colorado that I can tell, whereas in New Hampshire they can and do bill you if you're found "negligent".

I remember reading a couple years ago when NH changed the law so that you could be billed for just negligence instead of "recklessness" a bunch of search and rescue organizations were opposed. I'd definitely pay for the card if I lived there but not happily. I wonder if they keep rescue statistics and if the new laws and card will affect rates of negligent and reckless designations.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


When I've used trekking poles in the past I've just borrowed from friends but I'm doing some trips alone and need a pair of my own. Search isn't working for me right now, but there's been advice here about which kind of lock on adjustable poles to avoid. So I'm interested in that and any general advice on what to look for.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


please don't hike with speakers

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


HEY VAPER posted:

Umbrellas own, RIP golite umbrellas.

A couple people I know were worried about not being able to replace their Golite umbrellas but the design was just licensed from another company. You can still buy them (not sure if that's the exact model but it is the manufacturer), just the logo and colors are different.

And also thank you and everyone else for the trekking pole info, it helps to know what to look for and gear chat helps pass the time until the weather improves.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


HarryPurvis posted:

Oh, and just a reminder that Mountain Lions live nearby: P-19 & 15-Month-Old Kittens :3:

I know the thread is still afraid of bears but we should be cool with cougars, they like hiking too

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Why do you have to hike the JMT? It's going to be crazy crowded this summer (and presumably all summers from now on). There are so many other places you can go without the crowds and without the restrictive permitting.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


There are more PCT hikers than ever before. The new PCTA permit system is an attempt to spread people out but it still means there's going to be more and more people on the JMT for longer periods of the summer.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Picnic Princess posted:

Canisters don't seem to even be a thing around here. I've never seen anyone with one and these threads are the first I've heard of it.

It's a requirement in some heavily trafficked parks to try to prevent bears associating people with food more than they do. IIRC they're also required in the coastal section of Olympic National Park because of the horrible raccoon problem they have there.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I put spare clothes and sleeping bag in dry bags. I don't bother with the tent, if it rains here it tends to drizzle for days so the tent's going to get and stay wet.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Casu Marzu posted:

Trip report



lmao

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


please floss

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Backcountry Navigator has worked fine for me, but I don't do anything advanced with it, just find my location if I'm not sure where I am. I've found it easier to make my offline maps using Mobile Atlas Creator and transferring to my phone instead of trying to use the app to download the maps.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

I will have to admit, coming from multiple suggestions from people in this thread, Pasayten Wilderness was insane. I will definitely be back.

I'm probably doing the Boundary Trail this summer :getin:

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


bunnielab posted:

I do think I would prefer a side entrance to an end one.

You will. I've been using a Tarptent Contrail this year and everything about it is fantastic except trying to get into it. Whenever I buy a new tent it'll be something with a side/larger entrance.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Bears around here won't bother you. I'd probably be too lazy to hang my food if it weren't for the rodents. Several parts of Olympic National Park require a bear canister.

There are a lot of possible loops in the Cascades around Stevens Pass in the Alpine Lakes and Glacier Peak Wildernesses. Your best source for ideas will probably be the tons of local backpacking guides at every secondhand book store and either asking on NW Hikers or searching for "loop". The WTA site is useful for trail descriptions but is set up more for day hikes, though the trip report section will probably have reports on whatever you're thinking of hiking. Always call up the ranger station for trail conditions too, a lot of books contain trips on trails that aren't really maintained anymore.

If you're willing to drive a little further there are similarly great hikes north of SR 20 which have the benefit of fewer people, and now that you live here you're required to explore the Olympics eventually.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Levitate posted:

To db franco I'd just say, make sure you have a bailout plan if you have trouble with the mileage or other issues like injuries.

Especially this, the Bob is pretty remote. I'd really suggest reconsidering the length of your trip or the number of days, hiking in the Montana Rockies can be **special**.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Keldoclock posted:

Seriously, 20mi/day is easy, any healthy person can do it (read: not fat, not old, not a wimp). It doesn't require you to move fast, you just have to not take breaks and walk all day.

No one's really arguing that it can't be done, we're just suggesting that in the context of db franco's multiperson "getting the high school gang back together, once-a-year Hoo-Rah" walking all day with no breaks, likely at different paces and levels of fitness so they won't see each other much during the day, isn't going to be the optimal experience. I would assume from db franco's questions that he isn't the most experienced backpacker, and the most common piece of advice I hear experienced long-distance hikers give to newbies is go low miles (10 or less) for at least your first week and slowly work up after that. Could they do 80 miles in 5 days in the Bob? Probably, but I bet it's going to be pretty miserable for at least some of the group.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Salmonberries, thimbleberries, huckleberries and blueberries are all pretty common around here and good eatin'.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


The fires here in Washington are getting out of control again. They evacuated a bunch of towns, including one I did some backpacking out of a couple weeks ago (Winthrop). I just heard some places I thought were out of harm's way are being evacuated because of new fires and they're sending rangers in to try to locate hikers. :ohdear:

Stay safe out there!

e: I guess there are new fires in Glacier too, areas I hiked in last month are closed too.

Officer Sandvich fucked around with this message at 23:53 on Aug 20, 2015

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


You'd probably be fine in a group. I wouldn't hike at night alone in an area where bears were accustomed to humans.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Keldoclock posted:

When you look at the sky at night, do you close your eyes when the ISS passes over you? How about aircraft?

If you could see the lunar retroreflector array with your bare eyes, would it bother you too?

...It's OK though, I get them back on mixed-use horse/cycle trails by roaring past them at 22mph blaring Yeezus tracks on my cell phone.

are you just trolling

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Picnic Princess posted:

Question about your national forests: how much are you allowed to get away with in there?

U.S. National Forests are pretty open. Random camping's allowed, it's known as dispersed camping. Fires are also allowed unless any burn bans are in effect. Collecting firewood and foraging (mostly for berries and fungi around here) are allowed, but if you're taking any of it home for personal use or selling you need a permit. I can't find the story I read right now but this year's bad huckleberry crop has lead to physical altercations as people try to claim specific patches for themselves, which isn't allowed. Hunting and fishing are allowed but you have to follow the regulations of whatever state you're in even though it's federal land.

There are then areas within the national forests that have tighter rules. Many (most?) of the national parks are within national forests and have many more restrictions. Areas designated as Recreation Areas I think don't allow dispersed camping. Areas designated as Wilderness allow hunting and fishing but no vehicles or machinery or anything with a wheel (bikes, carts) which has always seemed like a strange regulation. I don't know about usage or impacts, areas close to population centers that have maintained roads are often trashed but there are always pristine areas to see. Like most places, if you're backpacking and get more than a mile away from the road you probably won't see many people.

We have so much National Forest land in the west, and so much of it is so remote, that a big source of environmental contamination is marijuana farming. Locals or people employed by the Mexican cartels can grow huge plots of weed and leave behind tons of fertilizer, pesticides, trash, and irrigation equipment that are costly to clean up and have a big impact on the local ecosystem.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I think about that every time I cross one because I'm a fatass

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

Welcome. I just moved here in Augustfrom Chicago and love exploring this place. I've been to nearly every corner of the state and just about every major highway.

What's your favorite part so far, and why is it the Olympics? :black101:

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


bongwizzard posted:

Let's say I'm hiking a state park and discover a vintage American car flipped upside down in the woods maybe 300 yards from a logging road. Let's also assume the chrome bumper on this thing is in really good shape and somehow not full of bullet holes.

If I try to get the thing off and take it home, am I a good Samaritan cleaning litter out of the park, or a thief robbing from America's precious cultural heritage?

leave it there

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I was really out of shape the time I did St. Helens and it sucked. Be in shape and it will be awesome. Bring lots of water.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


mastershakeman posted:

Realtalk I've tried this type of thing and how do you get enough fiber? Or do you just hike a few extra miles because you never need to poop

dried fruit usually does it for me

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Thread consensus was flick locks when I asked. They've held up fine and I treat my poles like poo poo.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Mt. Rainier had a problem with their reservation system and are going all walk-in this year. If you've been looking at any popular trips there they'll probably be easy to get permits for this year.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


I wear 13 4E and have found New Balance to be the only brand to reliably fit and be available. My last two pairs were their Leadville model and they were very rugged, though I haven't tried the new model. The only problem I have with them is if they get submerged they'll stay wet longer than any other trail runner I've used so I learned to take them off fording streams pretty quickly.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


bongwizzard posted:

Do you care at all what you look like? If not, look into hooded, long sleeve fishing shirts. I just got one as all my older fishing bros keep getting bits of there faces cut off and it looks like a bummer. It is billowy and fits like a sack, but it is the coolest long sleeved shirt I have ever worn.

i extremely don't care what i look like, i'm going to look into these

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Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010



It's crazy to me how many visitors Olympic gets. I know it's mostly people driving to the beach or lakes or Hurricane Ridge but it's so easy to be alone in the park.

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