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gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

What would folks recommend for a mid-layer jacket?

Here's my situation - some of my day hikes are getting longer and more remote and I'm starting to think more about what I would want with me for a day hike that unexpectedly turned overnight. Most "essentials" list a mid-layer jacket as a part of being prepared. I'm very happy with my base layers for hot and cold weather and I have a good hard rain shell that doesn't provide much warmth, so what makes sense to have to go in between the layers in case? I've been bringing a pretty standard North Face softshell but it packs large, even in a stuff sack. Is there something that is ideal for this situation? I also do carry a bivvy sack but feel like I need something more. What about just an extra cold-weather base layer that I could add?

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gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Thanks for the advice, all. I'm in wet and relatively warm Western WA so synthetic is probably the right trade-off. I have heard good things about the Patagonia Nano Air in other contexts so I'll take a look at that, but I believe my local REI also has the Atom LT in stock so I'll go and try them both on and see what clicks. Looks like either would also be a good jacket for living daily life or for being a versatile option to have in the pack on a warm summer day where rain isn't expected and you're hiking in a t-shirt.

Normally I wear Patagonia Capilene for base layer, the 1 or the 3 or both depending on temperature, and then I have an REI rain shell that's very light and has pit zips and everything, which is important since I get warm fast when moving around. We've had a warm winter in the west so I haven't had any temperature issues while moving around yet.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

A Kpro posted:

Went out to the Olympics this last weekend. Things were kinda snowy higher up



This was super lucky



The Olympic snowpack is like 3% of a normal year's. It's shocking to go up trails like Mt Ellinor or Mt Townsend that usually top out covered in snow in winter and spring and instead there's a few patches of snowfield here and there, like a usual summer. Great pictures, though.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

El Grillo posted:

Sitting in a bit shop looking at a new pair, bloody hell these things are expensive. Looking at scarpa terra gtx or salomon quest 4D 2 gtx, thoughts?

For what it's worth I have a pair of those Salomons and I really like them. With two sock layers I really have no problem with my feet getting wet even in all-day rain or light snow, they keep the feet warm, the inner sock layer can stick wick away sweat, and I feel like they grip well and are solid on rocks or scrambling terrain. If someone prefers something else, that's fine, but I really cannot complain.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Just because there's gear being sold to the general public doesn't mean some of it's not legit, though. For example, 99% of what Eddie Bauer sells is stuff for trendy moms to wear taking their strollers on power walks, but their Peak XV series is still world-class mountaineering gear. Patagonia gets called Patagucci for a reason, but a lot of what they still is still drat good clothing for people who need it.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Trip report from Saturday (images are linked thumbnails to bigger ones):

Mount Rainier National Park officially started "summer season" on May 1st, which means they open more roads and some previously difficult to access trails. I headed up for a snowshoe climb of Banshee Peak by way of Summerland, one of the more famous campsites on the Wonderland Trail (which encircles Mt. Rainier)

Summerland's fame comes from late July and August, when it is an amazing alpine meadow that looks like this:









I needed the snowshoes because yesterday it looked like this (You can recognize that Meany Crest in this photo is also in the first summer Summerland photo):



The guidebooks say that Banshee Peak is 15 miles round-trip and 3600 ft elevation gain from the trailhead to the summit at 7404 feet. It was a little longer for me - with everything covered with 2-10 feet of snow, I lost the trail a couple times, had to take detours to avoid avalanche areas, and generally had a harder time of it. With snowshoeing being harder than walking a dry trail, I was 10 hours from car to car - a strenuous day.

Looking up at the objective from the road, about 100 feet from the trailhead:



Some views of Banshee Peak and Point 6945 from the trail:





The trail started fairly snow-free, but I had to put on the snowshoes about 2.5 miles in. The trail to Summerland kind of vanished in the snow, so I ended up climbing pretty much straight up the very steep hill instead of finding the switchback trail I was looking for under the snow.



Summerland:



Above Summerland, there was hardly any sign of human activity. There was one boot path heading off in another direction for a different peak, and someone left some telemarking tracks right around Summerland, but I never saw any actual people above Summerland.

I was out pretty early in the morning, when it was still relatively cool, but it was clear there was already some avalanche danger on some southeast faces, I tried to stay away:



Getting to Point 6945 on the way to Banshee was relatively straightforward. Looking back down at Summerland from that peak:



Mount Rainier was, of course, spectacular. I have to imagine quite a few people summitted on a day like today. This is the Emmons glacier side of the mountain:





You could see far up the valley to the north:



And there were thousands of ladybugs on the rock at the summit, which seemed odd:



I headed off for the higher Banshee Peak - the rock prow you see in the center of the photo (looking back at on my way out, hence the tracks):



I had to cross a hairy avalanche gully but made it okay. The view from Banshee was remarkable:





The Cowlitz Chimneys are the next formation along if I were to continue - I didn't, I was tired enough as is after hours of snowshoeing, and didn't have the necessary rock climbing gear or partner:



With that I headed back down and bathed in the amazing alpine terrain:





Once I got back down to Summerland, I was able to follow telemark guy's tracks to the trail rather than having to downclimb that hill. The way down wasn't much better actually, it followed a river that was eating out the snow, very warm and wet and melty. It made for a hairy descent. Legs were aching when I got back to the car, but it was a remarkable place to be.

As a millennial, I am legally required to selfie everything I do:



This was intended to be kind of a practice run for a snowshoe of Mount Saint Helens I have planned for next Saturday - if weather cooperates, I think that will be an even more grueling and rewarding climb. Now the day after, my legs are aching pretty badly and I got a bit of a burn on my neck despite trying diligently with the sunscreen, but it was a drat fun way to spend a Saturday!

Gearwise, the MSR Revo Ascent Snowshoes were really good for snow climbing. They worked okay as just regular snowshoes, though I think I'm going to invest in the snap-on tail addition to add a little more float, but they shined when going up hill. If you just pointed your feet uphill and went, the crampons worked well and the heel lift was a huge energy saver. They weren't as good if you were traversing a slope rather than going straight up, so I found myself crabwalking sidewalks on all fours more often than I'd like, particularly on steep slopes. Still, the fact that I could get across the slope at all spoke to the traction of the snowshoe. I kind of beat up the plastic in the toe a little kicking steps in some of those slopes, but the manufacturers claim that's okay since the toe is reinforced with steel. The damage is only cosmetic at this point (really just scratching), I hope it stays that way. I would highly recommend these snowshoes if you want to snowshoe up peaks - the extra bells and whistles like the heel lift (essential in my book), the crampons and the stronger toe really made a difference on a slope.

Anyways, 15 miles of snowshoeing over 10 hours was quite a day, and it was a blast to do it in a place as beautiful as Mount Rainier National Park covered in snow!

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

This Saturday's pics - looking down on the still-smoking lava dome of Mt. Saint Helens (Mt. Rainier in the background) and a summit pano.



gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

What do the trailrunner fan club folks do about snow? Especially in the spring and fall, most of my hikes end up in snow at some point, and I can't imagine my feet not being wet and freezing in knee-deep snow and in my Merrill Moab ventilators. Something like the Salomon Quest keeps feet pretty warm and dry even in the snow portions of the hike, while being lighter and more maneuverable than Scarpa Mont Blancs in the dry section of the trail. I really appreciate the jack-of-all-trades flexibility of leather/goretex boots in these shoulder seasons and on hikes that go from dirt and rocks and streambeds up to ice and snow climbing.

Edit: "trailrunner fan club folks" is not intended to be derogatory by the way - I read that back and seemed like it could come off that way. Just interested in how/if the ventilated shoe approach works for snow.

gohuskies fucked around with this message at 05:29 on May 15, 2015

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

vulturesrow posted:

3. Bonus question for those acquainted with the PNW: what are some good hikes to start off with in the above categories of trips? We just did the Ice Caves Trail at Big 4 and for a really short trail it was pretty flipping awesome.

The Washington Trails Association website is your friend - they have a hike finder map where you can find trails and search based on distance, elevation etc and have trip reports and other info so you know if the hike is appropriate or not. They also have blog posts and so forth where they highlight some particularly good hikes in different areas.

http://www.wta.org/

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Smoove J posted:

I climbed up Mt James today, straightforward yet steep at the end, 16.5 miles, 4700ft elev gain.





That's a great view!

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Smoove J posted:

Yesterday I started towards Ipasha at 7am and got back at 9pm, long day, 6000ft elevation gain.


Iceberg Lake, those walls are 2000ft high and real steep but I'll get over them.


The Iceberg Notch, that's where I went up.


Mt Wilbur, Iceberg Lake. Mt Wilbur is one of five absolutely technical peaks in the park, maybe my favorite climb.


Here's the view from the top of the Notch. As I was climbing there were lots of avalanches around the lake so the icebergs moved around a lot.


Here's what's on the other side of the Notch. Centered are Ipasha and Mt Merritt, with Ahern Glacier and Old Sun Glacier, respectively.


This is the top of Ahern, and is as far as I got. It (Ahern) is the 50th unique mountain I have climbed. Had I attempted Ipasha, I would likely have been climbing down Iceberg Notch at midnight, and I was not up for that. Beautiful day, I'm feelin it.

That looks like an awesome climb.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Hypnolobster posted:

(and you shouldn't use DEET, seriously)

I know the 100% DEET is on the strong side, but I use 30% DEET and never had any bad side effects or anything - do folks really think the 30% DEET is that bad as long as your keep it off your face/mouth/eyes?

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

A Kpro posted:

Another weekend, another summit. Standing tall at 12065 feet, Mt Idaho offers hikers a fun scramble and decent views of the Lost River crest from Borah to Breitenbach.







Mt Borah. Couldn't make out if there were any hikers on there, but it's a state highpoint and it's a weekend so there were probably 20-30 people trying to summit, if not more.



A fun reminder that despite the mountainous region, I'm still in a desert.



There was a super fun scree skiing area after dropping off the ridgeline. One day I'll get a video of me doing that.

Other than that there's not much that's remarkable about this mountain, so why even climb it? Well it's 1 of 9 peaks in the state above 12k feet. Since I had already done the other 8, I now have all 9 twelvers done. It's a neat accomplishment for peak baggers in Idaho. I think someone has a list of everyone who's done it, at least that they know of. Stats for the trip: 4.5 miles, 5273 feet.

Nice peakbagging accomplishment!

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Saint Fu posted:

I stopped reading back when the OP stopped responding. Did anyone keep following it? What was the tldr?

His cart broke on the first day, he hiked another day and a half after that, spent a "rest day" at a ranger station and then a passerby called him an Uber home. He didn't make it out of the park he started in.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Hashtag Banterzone posted:

Thanks for the offer but I'm doing the hike with family so I will pass this time. Have you done St Helens by chance? I would love to give it a try next summer but I know it's more technical.

St Helens isn't technical at all - there's some scrambling but it's easy class 2. The biggest challenge with St Helens (besides the long drive to the trailhead) is getting a climbing permit, they sell out fast especially for the weekends. I think they start being available in March or so, so you'll have to schedule well ahead of time. It's a fantastic hike though, I encourage everyone to do it.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

NaDy posted:

There were some pretty sweet looking sheep on the way up.




Daaaamn, those are some badass horns! Looks like you were very close to him too!

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Braincloud posted:

I solo hiked Section J of the Pacific Crest Trail in Washington State southbound from Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie Pass and finally finished the write-up. It was 75 miles of pure awesome that I had planned on tackling in 5 days and ended up doing in 4. Full write up is here if anyone is interested: http://mycrookedpath.com/blog/pacific-crest-trail-section-j-stevens-pass-to-snoqualmie-pass-part-1/ It's two parts since there are a million pictures ...

Here are some pics:


Just lounging in camp




Chimney Rock (right) and Lemah Mtn. (left)


The PCT on the Chikamin Traverse under the 4 Brothers


Cloudy


The Kendall Katwalk into nothingness

This is awesome! I've hiked a bunch of times on the PCT up from Snoqualmie and I've been thinking about doing Section J, just might have to go for it next summer!

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

cheese posted:

I will say this. The difference between a 20 pound pack and a 30 pound pack is kind of amazing. You wouldn't think that 10 pounds is all that much, especially if you are in shape, but its no joke.

It's enough to make one think about how much easier hikes would be if you went on a diet for 3-6 months and lost and kept off 10 pounds. Of course, a beer or two is also enough to remind you how delicious one beer more would be, and those are two counterproductive feelings so this is a big struggle for me

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Saint Fu posted:

Oh man, I forgot about that guy. How far did he make it? Anyone have a link to the thread?

It's a long thread but the last thirty pages are people just making fun of him after he already failed. He starts the hike around page 23 or 24 or so.

http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3714480

I think he hiked for like two days, spent a day resting at a ranger station, and then a passerby called him an uber home on the morning of day 4, something like that.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

I don't know about Shasta but you need crampons if you're going to climb Mt Hood, not just microspikes.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

chef posted:

School me on winter hiking and possibly snowshoeing. I just moved to Seattle and am really sick of sitting around this depressing city. What do I need to get out for day hikes in the snow- and how do I go about it? I have winter clothes for skiing. I'm not talking any mountaineering or anything, but I would like to go for a long walk on a trail and hopefully see some views. No overnights.

Gaiters I know will be on the list, but what about footwear? Do I need a full on winter boot? I do have waterproof hiking boots, but they are mid rise and no insulation and I tend to run cold in general.

Then what about traction? Microspikes for 1-4 inches or so? Then snowshoes after that? How do I pick a good trail for winter? I know I'll be slower, but by how much? Thanks!

Besides gear for snow hiking, you have to be aware of avalanche risk and snow conditions. Obviously the best thing is to take an avvy class like AIARE, but there are trails that are safer than others. For mountain summit trails, the Everett Mountaineers have a handy PDF about their evaluation of avvy risk on some common peaks: http://www.everettmountaineers.org/scrambling/scramble_pdf/Winter_Summits_List.pdf Be aware that this is their evaluation - your comfortable risk level may be different than theirs, and always evaluate what the conditions are when you're there on the mountain, not what a guidebook says they should be. Sometimes places that should be safe can be dangerous, and vice versa.

Check out the Washington Trails Association and NWHikers.net's forum for trip reports to see if there's up to date information on a trail or nearby trail's condition, with the understanding that conditions can change in just a few days depending on the weather. NW Avalanche Center also has predictions on avvy risk, and of course check out weather recent history and forecasts to get an idea of what conditions have been like and what they'll be when you're there.

Winter takes a little bit more prep work and information than summer hiking, but it's great to be out in the snow! I love it.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

MMD3 posted:

yeah, this is what I was thinking... why not just buy some microspikes or yaktrax that can go on any pair of boots you may have w/out ruining the sole.

Yaktrax kind of suck and most good soles actually hold up pretty well to the screws - but yeah, microspikes are pretty far superior in basically every way except cost, and they don't even cost all that much.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

mastershakeman posted:

I don't think you need a bear canister in winter, won't the bears be hibernating?

Bear canisters are just as helpful for keeping raccoons and other little critters out of your food as bears.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Levitate posted:

Yeah only issue is last I heard they're not approved for areas like Yosemite and the like. Would have to check on SEKI and some of the forests in the Sierra but SEKI still allows you to hang food if there are trees (though they strongly discourage it) so I imagine an Ursack would also be fine

Even within the same land management system they have different ursack policies. Like here in WA, Ursacks are okay in North Cascades NP, not okay in Olympic NP, and they want you to hang from food poles at approved campsites in Mt Rainier NP.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

marsisol posted:

Anyone ever hiked Mt. St Helens? My buddy got permits for August and wants me to come out.

Yeah it's awesome, you should do it. By August all the snow will be melted so it's pretty dusty, but the weather's likely to be great and it's an amazing view from the rim of the crater.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

A Horse Named Mandy posted:

This may be a dumb question, but does how does Enchantment Lakes rank as a destination? I'm a 14 hour drive one-way, which is a bit much for how short it seems as a hike. Is it mostly just a thing for residents of the pacific northwest? I mean, I love the hell out of the Tahoe area, but I doubt anybody is coming down from Seattle for a weekend.


Great reference. I drove through the redwoods on my way to the Lost Coast and have been needing to see more ever since.

Enchantments are ridiculously awesome but not worth a 28 hour round trip drive. If you're ever in the area in season, it's worth checking out though. The overnight permits are in very high demand and short supply, but the through-hike can be as short as 18 miles if you want it to be, so if you're in decent shape it's a day hike.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Mt Rainier NP in the spring, once the White River road has opened to the north side but before all the snow has melted, is my favorite place in Washington state. Amazing snowshoeing, beats just about anything else for me.



In the summer when the snow melts it's still amazing, many people think it gets even better with the wildflower meadows. I've been getting more into trail running lately and my big goal (for like next 3-4 years) is to do a single push run of the 93 mile Wonderland Trail around the mountain.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

mastershakeman posted:

Got a link to the spray? I have some washin but am afraid to use it in a top loading washer (rather than front loading) and would rather just use spray.

http://nikwax-usa.com/en-us/products/productdetail.php?productid=265

Or can just google nikwax spray, they sell it tons of places.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Verman posted:

I feel like Charlie with a golden ticket. I got Enchantment permits on my first time trying and I got them by ...


... applying to Stuart lake as my last option.

I was hoping to get a core enchantment permit as it allows you to float and camp all over but I would rather go than not so I'm pretty excited. A rock climbing coworker of mine was telling me about a scramble up to the summit of Mt. Stuart which sounds awesome. So it looks like we'll just set up a basecamp and day trip from there.

I was already in the process of planning one of our annual dude trips out here (Washington state) this summer with a few of my friends but I don't think the timing will allow this to work for that. A few of the guys on that trip will be first timers as well so the enchantments might be too much for people who have never been backpacking. Either way, I'm really looking forward to my first year out here and I can't imagine the miles I'll get in this year. I'm hoping I'm out hiking at the very least every other week.

For what it's worth - the scramble route to the summit of Stuart is the Cascadian Couloir, from the south side of the mountain and not from the Stuart Lake side. There are some great routes up Stuart from the north and west (in fact they're the best routes up) but they're all 5th class and higher and require some climbing skills and equipment.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Verman posted:

A question for those familiar with the rules of the Enchantments.

I'm curious if we (a group of 6) go out and establish a basecamp in our specified zone, can we split off and hike separately during the day so long as we return to sleep in our zone all together that night? I know there's a rule about people sleeping as a group but I didn't see anything along the lines of hiking as a group.

My thought is that we would split during the day as some folks want to go technical climbing and others just hike. Those who want to climb Mt Stewart could go do so, those who want to go explore the other areas for the day could go do that stuff just as long as we all return back to our zone and camp for the night.

Yes, Enchantment permits only apply to sleeping. You can walk wherever you want as long as you sleep in your zone. Be aware that the north side routes of Stuart are very technical though, and should only be attempted by people who are experienced alpine climbers. There is a scramble route up Stuart (Cascadian Couloir), but it's on the other side of the mountain from the Enchantments zones. There are some other peaks that are difficult scrambles like Colchuck and some that are basically walk-ups like Little Annapurna. Stuart is not to be taken lightly.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

OSU_Matthew posted:

Probably not, with the risk of carbon monoxide and the stove getting knocked over, but this was just testing it out on top of my gas stove on a well ventilated kitchen with a fire blanket handy, sooo :shrug:

What all does everyone carry in their first aid kit? I'm taking everything expired out of mine and redoing it from scratch. So far I've got:

-Miniature scissors
-Sharp tweezer (splinters, etc)
-Tick Key
-Small nail clippers
-Liquid bandage bottle (small cuts, blisters, etc)
-Ibuprofen/NSAID tabs (pain reliever, inflammation reducer)
-Immodium tabs (to prevent dehydration from diarrhea)
-Benadryl tabs (allergic reaction)
-Alcohol wipes (sterilisation)
-Moleskin patch
Quick clot bandage, 25 gram (traumatic wound gauze)
-Self sealing compression gauze (splint, traumatic wound closure and protection)
-3m Steristrip wound closure strips (closing deeper cuts)
-Zinc oxide (to treat chafing)
-Latex gloves
-Accident report form (for first responders to know what exactly happened)

What other kinds of stuff do you guys bring along? Trying not to be too crazy, but adequately prepared with only stuff I know how to use.

Besides just more regular gauze (always useful to have extra gauze when dealing with a bleed) and some ace bandages and triangular bandages, which are useful for dressing wounds, making splints, and all sorts of other stuff, I'd recommend some brand of combat application tourniquet for containing an arterial bleed and a SAM splint for splinting broken bones. You can make a splint in a pinch out of a trekking pole or a good stick or other found materials, but it's so much easier and comfortable to use one of the SAM splints designed for it. The tourniquet is unlikely to ever be used but in an arterial bleed situation can be the difference between life and death. I don't think folks should count on being able to tear up a shirt or use a belt as a tourniquet and they aren't going to be as effective as the real thing.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

armorer posted:

Is there a website where I can sort hikes by elevation gain and distance? I need to do some training for alpine climbing and want to find the steepest trails near me to do some hiking with a heavy pack.

Where are you? If you're in Washington, the WTA hike finder map can kind of do that (though if you're here I'll just tell you that you want to do Mailbox Peak and repeats on the Cable Line and Section Line trails on Tiger Mt) and there may be similar sites for your state. Or just find your online climbing forum for your area, I'm sure there would be plenty of threads about conditioning.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

armorer posted:

I'm in SE Pennsylvania, where we are lacking any real mountainous regions. I'm prepping for a late summer (end of august probably) trip in the northern Cascades.

It looks like I might be able to get 600ft or so of climbing at Hawk mountain, but I'd like bigger options if folks know of any.

Best bet may be to find a gym with one of those big industrial-grade stairmasters and find some good podcasts to keep you from getting too bored. You'll get stares wearing big boots and a pack at the gym but so what.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

For backcountry first aid your main concern is preventing immediate death, since you may not be able to do much more than that. It'd be great to get the patient in condition for self-rescue, but that may or may not be feasible. Besides medical issues like heart attack or whatever that you can't do much about in the backcountry, in the short term people die from four things - airway obstruction, inability to breathe, bleeding, or exposure, with disability/spinal injury as the 5th major thing you want to worry about for backcountry trauma response.

Exposure you deal with using your other gear - warm jacket, extra hat/gloves/socks, bivvy bag or a CCF pad to sit on, etc. Airway and breathing can be tough to handle in the field, but here skills like CPR and knowing how to clear an airway matter (along with having epipen/benadryl for anaphylaxis if there's someone with allergies in the group). Disability/spinal you handle by having someone hold c-spine for hours on end, which is exhausting, and maybe finding a way to construct a neck brace. So really the thing you need in your kit is bleeding management - quick-clot gauze, regular gauze, bandages/dressings and maybe a tourniquet. But a good bleed kit and medical tape plus your regular hiking gear can get a lot done.

Stuff like SAM splints are nice to have and can make self-rescue a lot more feasible, but they aren't strictly necessary. Then this is on top of stuff like communication with the outside world, water filtration/purification, food, and the aforementioned gear for exposure that you should have anyways and that most folks wouldn't count as first aid supplies.

Everyone should at least take a weekend Wilderness First Aid class - you'd be surprised how much you can learn in as little as 16 hours, and how different it can be from urban first aid. I recommend Remote Medical International if they do stuff in your area.

gohuskies fucked around with this message at 19:55 on Mar 28, 2016

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

n8r posted:

I had a post about how silly carrying alcohol swabs, gloves, and poo poo that is designed for people with bullet wounds, but it got lost when the forums were down. I especially like the idea of handing someone an incident report form when the rescuers show up.

Benadryl, Immodium, and narcotic painkillers are all smart things to have. If you understand the basic concepts of how to stop bleeding, you can improvise all of that stuff.

Latex gloves pack up super small and are really no hassle to keep in a kit, and while a draft incident report form is probably unnecessary, it's a good idea to have a pen or pencil that you can jot down numbers with on a wrapper for a gauze pad or something. It's difficult (for me at least) to remember pulse and respiration rates when you're focusing on everything that's going on in an emergency situation. If somebody is seriously injured, you should be tracking those numbers over time to see if their condition is deteriorating or if they're going into shock or what. Rescuers and 911 dispatchers will certainly expect that kind of information from first responders, and I don't think tracking that kind of important info is something to make light of. The draft incident report forms can also serve as helpful checklists and reminders for folks who maybe only take a first aid class every five years or so and might not remember everything they learned.

gohuskies fucked around with this message at 21:42 on Mar 28, 2016

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Atticus_1354 posted:

I need some help finding a decent set of trail runners. My criteria are that they must be available in 13 Wide to fit my big feet and have rugged construction since I will be in a very very thorny environment and I hate things poking the sides of my feet. Also preferably under $150 if possible, but I will pay for improved construction. Who is the current best manufacturer for us wide flipper feet people? I will be going to REI and other places to try some on, but the problem is they often only have one or two pairs in my size.

See if you can find a Nike Wildhorse 3 to try on - they don't come in wide sizes but their last is wider than most normal shoes anyway. I fit best into 12 Wides for most shoes and the 12.5 Wildhorse works great for me and the 12 still fit pretty okay. Their construction is robust, I've put more than 300 miles on a pair and aside from some dirt they still look and wear brand new. They also have great traction, even in mud and wet situations.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Tigren posted:

I'm pretty sure that's how most of these horror stories start. Moral of the story is don't be a dumb.

Except there are some really cool places with featureless snowfields in between the trailhead and the cool place. Sometimes people want to go to those places and need to be able to navigate through them even in bad weather.

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Levitate posted:

Is it like, just BLM land? Pretty sure they can't force the handover of National Parks and forests that were set aside with other laws and acts

Seems like something that wouldn't get through without being attached to another bill going through but yeah that's pretty hosed up


The bill would transfer National Forest land as well, which covers tons and tons of recreational areas:

quote:

This bill directs the Department of Agriculture, through the Forest Service, to convey to a state up to 2 million acres of eligible portions of the National Forest System (NFS) in it that it elects to acquire through enactment by the state legislature of a bill meeting certain criteria.

Portions of the NFS conveyed to a state shall be administered and managed primarily for timber production.


https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/3650/all-info#summary

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

taqueso posted:

As far as I can tell, that bill hasn't even left committee yet, it is just at the "ordered to be reported" stage: http://lowenthal.house.gov/legislation/bill-to-law.htm

Probably no reason to panic, yet.

It just passed out of committee - that's why people are starting to raise the alarm. According to the congressional info page committee markup happened 6/15: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/3650/all-info#committees

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gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

taco_fox posted:

I'm looking to go backpacking in the north west US sometime in the next few months. It's one of the regions I haven't hiked yet. Any recommendations for the best place to go in Washington or Oregon?

An outdoorsperson coming to the PNW without visiting Mt Rainier is like an art lover going to Paris and skipping the Louvre.

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