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knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Pennywise the Frown posted:

I've been slowly acquiring gear for backpacking. I doubt anyone here would use it due to weight and size but I just ordered a Military Modular Sleep System. I'd like to try cold weather camping sometime and I could just take the patrol bag for warmer weather.

That's a british military bivvy bag - the camouflage waterproof bit I mean. They work well, I've slept in pretty horrible conditions and stayed dry. Is the sleeping bag a matching military one? If so, they're ok and bombproof but certainly not something I'd carry around on a civilian backpacking trip. Much too heavy and bulky.

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knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Pennywise the Frown posted:

No, it's most definitely American and was issued to the US military. I figured that the patrol bag is pretty small and light which might be good for summer camping.


You're right! I am a complete idiot. Sorry!

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

NonNCO posted:

Out of the blue here, but I'm going on a 800 mile hike for the Shikoku Pilgrimage in Japan over two months and was wondering about the issue that's always kicked my rear end to some degree; chafing.

In the past what's worked for me is just slathering bodyglide over thighs, rear end, strap contact area, etc. I was just wondering if there was a less smelly alternative that has worked for everyone else. Also, looking to buy a civilian with comfy straps for 25 miles/day pace, wondering if anyone knew of any really good ones. I was thinking of a tarp for shelter, 550 cord, a few bungees, and maybe a really light sleeping bag.

Here's my packing list so far:

550 Cord
Tarp for shelter
Bungees
Light sleeping bag
Couple lighters
Goretex top-bottom for rain
Compass
Phone
Rape Whistle
Bright fabric for emergency
GPS
iodine tabs for emergency
Extra set of boots (wondering if anyone knows a good non-military boot, I was used to using nike SF and standard issue boots, which were terrible)
Six pair of socks (in the past I used fox rivers, decently satisfied with them)
2-Quarts Water
And the assorted pilgrimage stuff that they give you

Any thoughts on this? It's kind of a strange path, sometime it's pretty isolated for tens of miles, but then there are quite a few towns/temples along the way. It's the least populated of the major islands, so it isn't like there's a huge city every two feet either. I'm trying to keep the weight fairly low in order to keep my target distance of 25m a day, so cutting out food/cooking stuff/tons of heavy poo poo in general was important to me and there seems to be enough civilization that I can eat along the way.

How hot or wet is it going to be? I'd think that would have a big impact on your footwear choice. At any rate 25 miles a day is a fairly significant distance.. I can recommend these http://www.salomon.com/uk/product/quest-4d-2-gtx.html?article=370729 as the best civilian boots I've tried (currently serving, UK though). They're goretex so may not be what you're after it it's going to be super hot.

If you're travelling light carrying extra boots seems like an odd choice. Lycra shorts (or losing weight) are good for reducing chafing.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Hungryjack posted:



I finally settled on my gear list for California next Friday. I'm sure I'm taking something redundant somewhere, but this should cover me well enough. Gonna dump some pictures on you guys when I get back.

Unless I die. Then no pictures.

The Thermarest Z-Lite is a great bit of kit. Love mine, it also fits nicely inside a hennesey hammock when it gets colder. Super comfortable.

E: Also I really recommend the Lowe Alpine alpine attack 45 if anyone is looking for a mid size pack, very comfortable, stable and lightweight.

https://lowealpine.com/uk/climbing/alpine-attack-45-55-3

knox_harrington fucked around with this message at 11:55 on Aug 21, 2016

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

nate fisher posted:

While I have a couple of Osprey backpacks for hiking I purchased the Mountain Hardwear Rainshadow 26 to keep in my Outback. I mainly use it for quick day hikes (1/2 day of less) and other random things. Lately I got into trail running, and for a couple of reasons I want to run with a pack (carry water, to put clothes in as I shed them, get use to wearing a pack, etc,). I just wanted something lite, waterproof, and compact (and cheap since it was $60), so what better reason to put something to use I already have. I started carrying this in December and during that time I've been running in jackets. This weekend I ran in just a t shirt and the pack rubbed the right side of my neck raw. So I guess in the end my question is what is the best way to adjust a pack to keep it from rubbing your neck? What am I doing wrong? Or is this just a case it is too narrow for my neck (that said I never had this issue until this weekend, but my jacket might of been offering protection)?

Here is a link to the pack -

https://www.mountainhardwear.com/ra...0180122134040:s

If you're going to be running I'd really recommend getting a running pack. Hiking packs are generally sturdier and don't hug you as well, and tend to move around more. They are also heavier normally.

I have an Inov8 22l race pack which is fantastic but looks to be discontinued.
https://www.sportsshoes.com/product/ino806/inov~8-race-elite-24-running-pack/

OMM packs are really good as well. https://www.theomm.com/product/classic-25/

These are UK brands but you get the idea. I generally would go for hiking type packs from 40l upwards.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Caveats: Locations, conditions. My day hiking pack is 30L, and while I don't often have it full, it's pressured on 15mi hikes, snowshoeing trips, or windy and/or cold days with lots of moisture (jacket, gloves, waterproof shell mittens, etc.).

So mummy bag buddies, how many of you rotate in the bag versus the bag rotating? In the first case the bottom of the bag is always down, even if you're on your side. In the latter, the zipper will always be in your same side, even if you're sleeping on your face. In the first case, which is my usual style, lots of moisture gets trapped and things get clammy.

I decided to give the second approach a try tonight in my 55F bedroom. I made it through 270deg, the opening cinched around my face, before the bag failed to follow and the zipper was spiraled 180deg around me and the opening was gone. :confuoot: I'm not claustrophobic but let's just say I flailed around to extricate myself. I guess suffocation is the only outcome of this while sleeping.

What's the trick?

I think the key is to have the right size sleeping bag for your body, if it's too big you will move around inside it, and also your body has to heat up the air around you (people argue about this but I can't understand why). I sleep as you describe but inside a goretex bivvy bag and the sleeping bag moves with me but the outer bag doesn't. The hood probably also needs to fit well around your head.


Re: backpacks, I am late to the game but I would always recommend looking for a bag with good compression straps so if it's not full the slack can be taken up. Mountaineering packs tend to be great as they are lightweight and without too many unnecessary features, but durable. I have this Lowe Alpine one and it's awesome: https://www.needlesports.com/884/products/lowe-alpine-alpine-attack-35-45-black.aspx

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

I have a Hennessy Hammock which is pretty good. Used it in the jungle in Malaysia for a few weeks and had no complaints, it's light and easy to set up even in the dark.

They are not cheap but pretty benchmark

https://hennessyhammock.com/products/explorer-ultralite-asym-classic

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Had a wander up the Pointes de Mourti here in Switzerland.

Looking from the bottom:


From the top


What an awesome day :)

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Obviously the best time to work out how to put up a new tent is at 3000m when the snow is starting to fall. Great view this morning though!


knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

For lowish temperatures and breathability I really recommend these:
https://www.mountain-equipment.co.uk/randonee-glove

Soft shell with a pile lining.

Gloves are obvs a really personal thing, I've been through shitloads trying to get the right balance between dexterity and avoid non freezing cold injury. Like you mention I end up with a pair of soft shells and some full on goretex ones for if its pouring.

Also some Arcteryx / Hestra liner gloves to level up if need be.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

theHUNGERian posted:

Very useful info. Thanks.

Will depend on what fits you best of course, but +1 for La Sportiva mountaineering boots. 3 of us had new pairs of Nepal Cube GTX on a week-long trip a couple of weeks ago, zero blisters between us. I also don't get on with multiple pairs of socks, just a decent pair that keep their spring after a day's walking (bridgedale are excellent, not sure if they are sold in the US)

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

armorer posted:

Where will you be overnighting? You can get a fuel canister for $6 at REI and a stove that'll screw on top for like $12 on amazon. Jetboil will certainly work but may be more than you need.

Yeah MSR pocket rocket (or equivalent) and a metal mug with a foil lid has been my lightweight solution for years. Jetboils are nice of course. I got the MSR equivalent recently and it was insanely expensive and doesn't have an igniter built in.. wtf?

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Those titanium mugs (I think the 750s?) are also the same diameter on the inside as a Nalgene flask which is satisfyingly space efficient.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Camped up in the mountains above the Lac de Moiry for the weekend.

Nice view to wake up to:


Moiry lake is incredibly blue

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

If there's not much cloud cover you can see loads at night without a torch if you let your eyes adjust. If there's a decent moon on a clear night you would have no problem at all.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

My guide on a climbing course here in Suisse was really into his incendio jacket. I think the dwr is pretty good on them.

I have an Inov8 super lightweight waterproof jacket which is excellent - as long as you don't have to take it off quickly as its a half-zip.

Looks like they only do the full zip version now: https://www.inov-8.com/us/raceshell-waterproof-running-jacket-mens-red?___store=us

For other lightweight gear the OMM stuff is great. https://theomm.com

knox_harrington fucked around with this message at 01:58 on Oct 10, 2018

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

If the pack is flapping about a bit or not cinched up well it can either cause you to be off balance or the contents can add extra force to each step. Also the way you land on each step going downhill can have a big difference - I have had slight knee problems for a while (and am now confined to the couch having actually broken it) and found that landing on a slightly bent leg with muscles tensed helped take some of the force off the knee internal bits. Ultimately though I just had to accept that some of the younger guys were just able to go faster than me downhill.

I actually just got a new pack a few weeks back, it's great and it's the larger version of this. Really well designed and lightweight. The easy close lid and side access are awesome.

https://www.patagonia.com/product/ascensionist-climbing-pack-30-liters/47997.html?dwvar_47997_color=INBK

(actually mine is the Descensionist 40L but w/e)

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Cheesemaster200 posted:

So I just got a new pair of heavy boots after surviving on hiking shoes after my last pair de-laminated a couple of years ago.

My shoe size is a 12.5, which is almost non-existent from most manufacturers. Therefore, I got the boots in a 13:

https://www.zamberlanusa.com/product/9789427/996-vioz-gtx-r-leather-backcountry-boots-dark-grey

They feel a little bigger than I would have liked, but have ample room in the toebox. I have about a thumbs length when I push my foot all the way in while unlaced. I don't move much when walking. I could move down to a 12, but it will be tighter. Is it best to start at a smaller size and have it expand or get the bigger boots which fit okay to begin with? They are leather boots without much padding.

Lowas come in US 12.5 and are great boots. I guess if your foot isn't moving those may be OK but they do sound a bit big.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

underage at the vape shop posted:

Overland Trail in Tasmania



I hiked up Cradle Mountain a while back, I'm sure it was just in trainers and I remember seeing a guy taking his very small kids up as we were coming down. Not really safe for toddlers!

Looking at the Wikipedia page it's 65km for the whole trail. I think in summer I'd go with some lightweight breathable trail runners. If you're carrying a big pack or on harder terrain then boots make more sense. Boots and gaiters will keep your feet nicely dry for crossing a few streams like in the photo, though.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

underage at the vape shop posted:

Now I need to figure out a sleeping bag. I think a -6/20F bag is sufficient, especially because I'm planning on carrying a thermal layer, I can wear that in the bag if it gets too cold. gently caress they get expensive real fast as they get smaller. I also need to figure out a tent. I've seen that a lot of tents use your hiking poles as support, so I guess I need to figure out if I want poles first. Do you guys use them?

After a very long night last summer when the temperature plunged unexpectedly I got some nice down sleeping bags for myself and my girlfriend.

Not sure if Alpkit will ship to Australia but they are excellent value. I got these: https://www.alpkit.com/products/pipedream-600

They also make a down quilt that makes a great extra layer or standalone if it's warm.

Sleeping mats have come a long way in terms of lightweight comfort. These are not cheap but warm and comfortable https://www.thermarest.com/neoair-xlite

Down sleeping bags are amazing but don't work if they get wet (so not very good for Scotland). I'd really recommend getting dry bags to put all your stuff in, some of them are very lightweight but will prevent problems if you slip crossing a stream or whatever.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

BeastOfExmoor posted:

Anyone have any thoughts on waterproof socks?

I've used them a lot in a military context. It may be that civilian ones work better but we only use them to help dry out wet boots when you're stationary. As they aren't very permeable and are in wet boots, if you try and hike any distance you get blisters pretty rapidly.

I'd go for gaiters - lots of us use the Berghaus Yeti gaiters which completely cover your boot and up to your knee with goretex. They look a bit funny but your feet just don't get wet.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Tacier posted:

I finally bought a backpack and I'm wondering if it fits right. There seems to be a lot of space between the pack and the middle/upper part of my back. My torso measurement is in between M and L, so I went with a M. Thoughts?



Still looks too big to me, do they make a S? Is the back length adjustable at all? The hip belt looks about in the right spot but the point where the shoulder straps attaches to the pack is almost at the top of your shoulders and should be further down. If you can shorten that one or give a smaller version a try it should work a lot better.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

The small might be too small. It looks to me like you need to add 10--20# (don't break it of course) and reset all your straps. Typically this means opening everything as wide as possible, then throwing it on. At a heavier weight you'll probably tighten the shoulder straps first so you can get the belt at the right level.

After the belt is snug, you should be able to loosen the shoulder straps and reset them. At this point the pack should be comfortable, weight centered appropriately over your feet. The load lifters are last.

(It looks like you've over tightened the load lifters, hence the straps are getting pulled up like that.)

(It also could be a waist-vs-hip belt thing)

Huh yeah think you are right.

https://www.gregorypacks.com/packs-bags/backpacking-packs/baltoro-65-916BAL65.html

Looking at the dude in the picture for some reason one of the compression straps is on OP's shoulder (did you put it there for the photo or is it attached to something?) but apart from that the back components look about the same position.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Well it's about time I got some new boots, so I guess I'll give it a try...

Recommendations for waterproof but mainly three-season/light boots with a more solid sole and good padding for the ball of the foot? Am I looking for Sportiva or ?

Context: Don't ever follow the advice of a podiatrist who talks about nothing but plantar fasciitis. I now have Morton's Toe and metatarsalgia. If you don't know what those are, you don't want them. Both are basically nerve damage.

You really need to try several on and see what works for you as foot shapes vary so much.

These are good, lots of my friends use them but they didn't quite suit me:
https://www.salomon.com/en-int/shop-emea/product/quest-4d-3-gtx.html#848=10655

I have these and think they're awesome:
https://www.lowaboots.com/mens/hiking/renegade-gtx-mid-black-black

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.


These look pretty bad, not quite as terrible as on first look but the single skin must make it pretty grim inside.

I have a 2-day mountain marathon coming up in August so I'm just starting to get gear together. I've ordered a MSR carbon reflex 2 with the fast and light ground thing, the race and camp is all over 2000m and that looks like a good light option. My Hubba NX3 is excellent so hopefully the reflex will do OK.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Rolo posted:

Anyone switch to hammocks from tents and have insight on it?

I already have a hammock and straps, so all I need is a net, quilt and fly. I kinda like the idea and I think I would sleep more comfortably.

I have a Hennessy hammock and it's great when it's warm. I remember that people get very complicated about putting them up with webbing straps and that kind of thing but I just tie mine. It does need a little bit bit of practice to get exactly right first time.

The one I have is a great design with the fly and net all in one thing. Obviously it's only useful where there are trees, other than that it does need to be warm and I always use a sleeping mat inside it. Great night sleep in one of those. What do you want to know about it?

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Bottom Liner posted:

Everything? Would you run a marathon in well broken in jean shorts?

Absolutely this. Some friends I did a 2 day cycle trip with did it in double denim for a laugh. There was so much chafing, it's a terrible idea.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

nitsuga posted:

My hand-me-down bag is falling apart, and Iím curious if I could get some advice on getting a pack. Mostly Iíll be doing 1-2 night stays in state parks, trying to use their backpacking sites only though. Iím up in MN, but plan to only overnight it spring through fall. I might do some snowshoeing in the winter and definitely some day hikes throughout the year.

So any idea what an ideal size would be? Could I comfortably handle both day trips and overnights with one pack? Could you make any specific recommendations?

Hereís a couple Iím curious about :
- https://www.rei.com/product/150947
- https://www.rei.com/product/111206
- https://www.rei.com/product/111281

Also, hereís a pic from my latest trip:



There's a pretty big difference in weight between those packs, personally I'm not a fan of Osprey bags and that one is quite a bit heavier than the Gregory one you're looking at.

As you are planning on snowshoeing you should probably go light if you can. 45L is big for an overnight trip, if you have a big bag you'll tend to fill it.

I have one of these (actually the ski touring version but they're similar) and it's excellent:
https://eu.patagonia.com/ch/en/product/ascensionist-climbing-pack-40-liters/48002.html

Obviously this depends on the rest of your kit, it you have a huge sleeping bag it will take more space etc

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Obviously it depends on what you're doing and what gear you have, and a massive sleeping bag and tent will of course fill up the space. I'm just not convinced that "my enormous 1970s gear is too big" is a great argument against trying to get used to a smaller pack.

Packable tents aren't necessarily expensive any more
https://www.terra-nova.co.uk/sale/tent-sale/second-zephyros-2-tent-17/

(I got one of these which I haven't used yet as a mate I was going to do a trip with broke his toe. The pack size is tiny)
https://www.msrgear.com/tents/carbon-reflex-2

Dude is going to be snowshoeing and if you're climbing up mountains the weight reduction makes a big difference.

Anyway, horses for courses.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Chard posted:

Phew, for that price why not just look at Zpacks? They're single-wall so you give up the removable fly but save almost half the weight.

I actually got the tent with a footprint thing that you substitute for the full inner tent and makes it lighter, on the basis that there aren't too many mosquitoes at altitude. I think about 600g total weight.

Yeah you can get lighter with the ones that use adjustable trekking poles but then you have to definitely carry the poles and they don't look that stable if a storm rolls in. I think I recall that the Zpacks fabric is really fragile and maybe unsealed seams? The MSR was around the lightest while still being a self-contained tent.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

ogarza posted:

I've used the Zpacks before on a canoe trip, came back and immediately ordered another one and their tarp.

I like the look of the zpacks tarps. Might get one of the camouflage ones. How shiny is that material? If its glinting in the sunlight there's not much point it being camo.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Montane Terra are benchmark hiking pants and have great pockets. They last forever as well.

https://www.montane.com/mens-c1/terra-pants-p401

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knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

MrNemo posted:

I don't get to go hiking nearly as much as I'd like (due to living in London and the Rona) but I'm wondering how useful something like the Garmin Fenix 6 is as a navigation aid. I've done walks before using guide books (UK walks near London tend not to be proper wilderness walks) but I'd like something more convenient and wrist mounted is tempting.

My basic motivation is getting a fitness tracker for running but trying to figure out if there's value going for a higher end model to supplement the other stuff I enjoy doing.

A fenix 6 Pro is a great watch, I wouldn't use the mapping for navigation beyond following gpx routes but it does work OK. You would want to install better mapping than the base stuff.

However what you want is really the OS app for your phone (and also a physical map and compass)

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