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EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I drove up to New Hampshire for a quick hike of Sandwich Dome on Saturday, up Sandwich Mountain Trail, and down Drake's Brook Trail. The weather was great, not a cloud in the sky and highs in the upper 20s. Not a lot of snow on the ground though, only a thin coating and patchy ice above 3000'. It snowed yesterday, and there's more snow expected this week. Hopefully it'll be more like winter next time I go up.


Mount Washington and the Tripyramids by EPICAC, on Flickr


Waterville Valley Ski Slopes, Franconia Ridge, The Osceolas by EPICAC, on Flickr


Drake's Brook by EPICAC, on Flickr

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EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Miron posted:

I drove over to New Hampshire yesterday and hiked up Owl's Head. The total trip was 17 miles with a bushwack that saved us some distance and a couple tough stream crossings. Given the weather I wasn't expecting to meet anyone else but we came across another group just before the summit. We took the slide up and they did a bushwack straight up through the dense spruce. I'm not sure which of us made the worse choice. We joined up with them for the rest of the hike which was fun.

Are you working on the New Hampshire 4000 footers? Everyone my wife and I saw and talked to when we hiked Owl's Head last June were working on the list (ourselves included). I thought it was a fun hike, even if it's long and the only real views are from the slide.

Did you do the bushwhack from the Black Pond Trail? We took that route when we did it. Apparently there's a herd path that you can follow for much of the route. We lost it, and ended up trending too far west. Our descent back down to the trail was a miserable slog through thick spruce. We opted for the stream crossings on the way back.

I've read about another bushwhack that bypasses the slide that's commonly used in the winter, I wonder if that's what the other group took. Apparently both whacks are commonly used enough and easy to follow in the winter once they get packed down by snowshoes.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



BeefofAges posted:

Microspikes rule.

My Microspikes are the single most used piece of non-clothing winter equipment that I have (if you count gaiters as clothing). If there's packed snow or ice on the ground I'm likely wearing my Microspikes. Even if the trail is packed snow, I like the extra traction that they provide

Last winter I used my microspikes every hike, and wore them most of the time. My snowshoes got a little bit of use, but NH didn't get a lot of snow last year so they mostly stayed on my pack or in the car. I used crampons once, for some steep, icy bulges on one section of trail.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



My wife and I hiked Mount Starr King (3907') and Mount Waumbek (4006') in Jefferson, NH on Saturday (7.8 miles, 2900' elevation gain). High winds in the forecast kept us from picking a more exposed hike. Temps were in the low 20s, and it was breezy, but not too bad. There was a pretty good snowshoe track to follow. It was still a bit soft, so we wore our snowshoes most of the way. I loved the snow/ice encased trees up high.


Snow encased trees by EPICAC, on Flickr


Starr King Trail by EPICAC, on Flickr


The Presidentials in the Clouds by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Went on a trip with my employer's (a university) outing club on Sunday. We went up Mount Hight and Carter Dome in New Hampshire. The weather was unusually warm for this time of year (temperatures were in the mid 40s). The trip leaders made the mistake of not having all of the participants bring/rent snowshoes, so most people ended up postholing once the temperatures warmed and the snow became slushy. I'm glad I had my snowshoes. Aside from the unseasonable temperatures, the weather was great. There were great views from Hight, and some good views from a lookout on Carter Dome. The snow was mostly too soft to glissade on the way down, except for a steep section descending into Carter Notch.


Undercast by EPICAC, on Flickr


The Northern Presidentials by EPICAC, on Flickr


Rainbow from Carter Dome by EPICAC/url], on Flickr

[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/41566708@N08/8385532810/]

Descent to Carter Notch by EPICAC, on Flickr


Carter Lakes by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Did another Outing Club trip last weekend. We did a loop over Mount Lafayette and Mount Liberty (New Hampshire) going up the Old Bridle Path, and down Falling Waters Trail. I'd been wanting to do this hike in the winter for awhile, but my wife prefers shorter hikes in the winter, and want me hiking solo above treeline in the winter. I jumped at the opportunity, when this trip was posted. Below treeline there was a good bit of snow, but cover was patch above treeline. There was some harpack, sporadic patches of ice, some snow drifts, and a lot of exposed rock. Still a fun day.


Eagles Lake and Lafayette by EPICAC, on Flickr


Climbing Lafayette by EPICAC, on Flickr


Mount Lincoln by EPICAC, on Flickr


Mount Lafayette by EPICAC, on Flickr


Mount Lincoln by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I got my last hike of calendar winter in yesterday (I'll be out of town the last two weekends of the season). I did North and South Kinsman (New Hampshire) using Lonesome Lake, Fishin' Jimmy (AT), and Kinsman Ridge Trails (AT). It was a pretty warm day. Temps were about 25F at the hut, and maybe around 15F/20 mph winds on the summit of South Kinsman. The peaks were in the clouds, so the views were non-existent, but the rime-covered trees totally made up for the lack of views. I left the hut at the same time as another solo hiker, John, and we ended up hiking together the rest of the day. It's always great meeting people out on the trail. On the way down we passed Randy Pierce, a completely blind hiker, and his support team heading up.


Lonesome Lake by EPICAC, on Flickr


Rime-Covered Trees by EPICAC, on Flickr


Rime-Covered Trees by EPICAC, on Flickr


Rime-Covered Trees by EPICAC, on Flickr


Lonesome Lake by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



What kind of water treatment do you guys recommend? All of my backpacking to date has been during the winter, and we melted snow for water. I spend most of my time in the White Mountains in NH.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



A Kpro posted:

Another weekend, another mountain. It's Mt McCaleb, pretty much in the middle of Idaho



Not real sure what I was going for here...



Smoove J posted:

Top of Mt Rockwell, left to right we've got Statuary, Church, Vigil, Mt St Nicholas, Battlement & Caper at the far right. I've climbed all except for Church, Vigil & St Nick...



Good day, except the wind was howling at 50mph the whole way. 22 miles roundtrip, lots of elevation.

Save me jeebus posted:

Finally did Bierstadt-Sawtooth-Evans


Untitled by WestslopeBruin, on Flickr

Sunrise over The Sawtooth


Untitled by WestslopeBruin, on Flickr

I'm insanely jealous of those oh you who get to hike mountains like these on a regular basis!

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



My wife and I finished the New Hampshire 4000 footers on Zealand and the Bonds the weekend of September 28th. We set up a car spot at Lincoln Woods, and got a ride to the Zealand Trailhead. On day one we hiked over Zealand, to the Guyot Campsite, set up our tent, and then headed up to West Bond for sunset. On day two we hit Mount Bond, and Bondcliff, then hiked out back to our car. The weather was perfect, the fall colors were great, and the views were incredible. A total of 22 miles and 5200' of elevation gain.


IMG_5861 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5868 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5887 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5900 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5926 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5955 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_5993 by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



My mother-in-law has planned a visit to Yosemite for a couple of days after Christmas. I'm looking for some recommendations for day hikes. I'm pretty sure my in-laws will be hiking as well. They're in their early 60s, but are fairly active: recreational biking, camping (shortish hikes in to campsite), snowshoeing, easy hikes in the area. We'll have snowshoes and micro spikes for traction.

Does anyone have a recommendation for and easy/moderate hike if the in-laws come (~5 miles), or a more strenuous hike for my wife and I if the in laws sit out (up tp 10 miles)?

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I'm looking for a recommendation for some shell pants. I've been using a pair of Marmot Precip pants for the last two seasons, and while they're starting to delaminate in a couple of spots, I could probably get another couple of seasons out of them. However, they always tended to work their way down while hiking, and I've dropped an inch or two in the waist since last spring. So I'm afraid the problem will be worse this year. I'm also not crazy about the velcro waist closures. I had a pair of Gore-Tex pants from EMS before these that I liked the fit of, but I returned them because they were insanely fragile.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I'm looking for some recommendations for hikes in Colorado. I'll be attending a conference at the Snowmass Base Village Conference center form June 22-27. During the week, I'll have the afternoons free from 12:30-4:00, and won't have transportation. I was hoping for a few recommendations for hikes that could be reached on foot from the base village, and completed in about 3-4 hours, preferably something that will get me some elevation gain for acclimatizing.

After the conference is over, I was planning on renting a car on Friday and driving somewhere for a longer hike on Saturday. Then driving to Denver after the hike, and flying out on Sunday or Monday. I was hoping people had a recommendation for a good 14er to start with that would be generally between Snowmass and Denver, not too long (=<12 miles), and a trail with a fair amount of traffic (at the request of my wife since I'll be solo). I was planning on crashing in the car at whatever trailhead on Friday night, so an early start isn't a problem.

Also, what can I expect in terms of snow, weather, etc the last weekend in June? What kind of gear do I need to bring?

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Discomancer posted:

Mt. Bierstadt is relatively close to Denver and is a pretty easy day hike with a good amount of foot traffic. In June you can have any kind of weather on a 14er, it will probably be windy and a little cold, lots of UV, possible rain or snow. Bring enough water for the whole trip, don't expect to be able to fill up along the trail. Plus, you may see mountain goats there!

Or Pike's Peak if you want the easy 14er.

Thanks, I'll look into Bierstadt. How are Grays and Torreys when combined? Depending on what day I fly out, I might try for two hikes.

Waters not an issue. I'm paranoid about running out, and have been carrying about twice what I need all winter. I assume snow conditions can be quite variable from year to year depending on the snowfall. Any suggestions for resources for trail conditions etc? Will I need to brink along my crampons/microspikes/ice axe? (Packing more stuff isn't an issue since my employer will be paying for any baggage fees).

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Mr. Powers posted:

On the way down Sunday, in the rain, we saw countless people covered in cotton head to toe (khakis and polo shirts) starting the 4 mile hike up to Lafayette, with a forecast high of mid 40s.

Last Sunday (the 10th) some friends and I did a single day Presidential Traverse. The weather was beautiful for most of the day, but about halfway between Mount Pierce and Mount Jackson we started to hear thunder. We hurried over the summit of Jackson, and got below treeline as fast as possible. We were back in the trees for 10 minutes, with about 2.5 miles left of 22 miles total, and it started dumping. At first it was rain, then cranberry sized hail. This section of trail is pretty steep and rocky, and we were descending through a flowing river of hail. Getting soaked, and pelted with hail sucked, but the trail was manageable with caution.

We'd probably made it down a mile when we ran into two college age women standing on the trail. One pack between the two of them, only one had a poncho, the other was wearing a sweatshirt. It's around 6:15-6:30 PM by this point.
Them: Hi, we don't know what to do. What should we do?
Me: It's a lot worse higher up, and the summit is exposed, you should go down.
Them: But, we're afraid of slipping if we go down. And what do we do if it gets dark?
Me: Well, you just need to be careful descending, but you really should turn around.
Them: How far are we from the summit?
Me: You're probably about a mile from the summit, but you shouldn't go up. The weather is worse, and you have further to descend.
Them: But it was so nice and then it just suddenly started, and we were having fun.
Me: You really should go back down.

We started back down, and they were just standing there. One of my friends yelled back at them that they should turn around. I'm not sure what they did, but I never saw any news of a rescue so I assume that they were fine in the end. I just can't imagine thinking it's a good idea to keep heading to the top in the middle of a hail storm when you're so unprepared.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Suicide Watch posted:

http://nhpr.org/post/new-york-hiker-found-dead-white-mountains

Sometime died in the Presidential Range in the Whites yesterday while doing a hike. This is a pretty common hike in the summer and I've attempted it a few times in the winter, but always turned back due to high winds. Even when it's single digits, the windchill brings it down to negative temperatures easily. I don't know what would have convinced her it was alright to continue beyond the tree line solo without a partner in conditions where most of the time you can just barely be standing.

I'm willing to hike in the cold, but if the winds are too high I won't go above treeline. I hiked Mt. Carrigain, NH with some friends on Saturday. It was cold (highs ~7F), but the wind wasn't a factor while we were on the mountain. The sketchiest part of the whole day was the drive back to Boston that evening. I93 was basically covered with packed snow between Concord, NH and Boston, and this was before the brunt of the storm hit. I can't imagine why anyone would have gone out on Sunday.

From the news coverage and her Facebook account, at first glance she seemed to have had some mountaineering experience (Elbrus & Kilimanjaro). Perhaps she underestimated the hike because of the relatively low elevations. It sounds like she was planning a single day traverse of the Northern Presidentials (Madison, Adams, Jefferson, and Washington). I'm not sure what her planned route down Washington was, but getting to the summit from the main trailhead for Madison & Adams is about 11 miles, and 7500' of elevation gain. If she was planning on descending via the Jewell trail, she would have been planning a 16 mile day. The reports say that her husband dropped her off at the trailhead at 5:00 AM, and she activated her beacon at 3:30 PM. Her body was reportedly recovered near Star Lake, which is in the col between Madison and Adams.

I wonder why she didn't turn back sooner given her pace, especially since she was probably slowed by the fresh snow that had fallen the night before. Assuming that she had summited Madison, she had only covered about 5 miles only 1 mile of which was above treeline (with 6 more miles to Washington). Maybe she'd summited Adams as well, and was trying to retreat. If she was found near Star Lake, she would have been less than half a mile over flat terrain to the Valley Way trail, which quickly gets you into the relative shelter of the trees, from there it's less than 4 miles to the trailhead. Maybe she was disoriented, maybe she was injured. Of course this is all speculation.

The conditions were brutal Sunday night/Monday morning. The Mount Washington Observatory recored a temperature of -35F, with wind chills around -90F, and maximum gust of 141 mph, with sustained winds of 100 mph. There's video of the S&R, at around 0:20 you can see two people get blown off of their feet:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DP4u6VyrgCk

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Levitate posted:

I'd imagine it's the usual story of being indecisive about when to turn back and not thinking it's that bad until it's too late. Also maybe already disoriented at that point.

The weather around Mt Washington is legendary for being terrible from what I hear...I can't imagine deciding "nah I got this, it's OK if there's another freezing storm coming in"

Sometimes it's awesome to be in some difficult conditions but persevere and feel like yeah you were totally prepared and it was tough but rewarding, but you have to know when enough is enough and when it's time to turn back

A SAR guy posted some photos & comments on a New Hampshire hiking Facebook group. It sounds like a fall might have been responsible.

SAR Guy posted:

she was in the wrong place at the wrong time, and alone. It seems she fell, possibly wandering around up there, hypothermic. It's impossible to know for sure.

His photos:
https://www.facebook.com/NHTramper/media_set?set=a.10153650619858957.1073742059.671133956&type=1

A photo of the recovery location:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=815760191794914&set=p.815760191794914&type=1

Another view of the recovery location from Mount Madison, I think it's the outcropping just to the left of center:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1717884185694&set=a.1717809423825.2090004.1195934365&type=1

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



I'll be in the South LakeTahoe area next week, and was scoping out a couple of peaks. I was wondering if anyone here had any useful beta on either of the hikes.

Number one on my list is Mount Tallac via the SE Chutes Route. Since this involves off trail travel I'm interested in any route finding beta. Specifically, finding the spot where you leave the trail, and also finding your way up the chutes. The route description doesn't give much detail, and the photo of the route on the page above shows the lower part very well, but not the chutes themselves.

The other is Pyramid Peak in the Desolation Wilderness. I was considering the Rocky Canyon Route up that leaves from rear Strawberry/Twin Bridges. Any beta on that trail?

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



alnilam posted:

Please recommend me a 2 or 3 night backpacking trip in driving distance from Sacramento, CA!

My gf is working in Sacramento for a month and I'm gonna join her at the end of it and we're so excited about being a 2-3 hour drive from so many amazing natural places. We want to finish off her stay with a 2 nighter or possibly a 3 nighter.

Our experience:
We're both from appalachia and have backpacked plenty around here and in a few other climates. I haven't done any serious Mountains, just appalachian "mountains." She's backpacked on some moderate mountains in Washington state, no technical climbing though, but some scrambling and scree stuff. I've backpacked in Humboldt Redwoods, that's my only major west coast experience, and my most elevation was some cliffs on Kaua'i.

I guess my point is neither of us are ready to do a technical climb on a backpacking trip, but we're both pretty comfortable with hiking or even scrambling up small mountains/large hills.

Also this is in mid September, if that has any bearing for permits etc I'm from a land where nobody at all backpacks so there's no such thing as permits "running out," this idea is foreign to me.


Thanks in advance for any advice!

You should check out the Desolation Wilderness, near Lake Tahoe. Beautiful, rugged scenery. Here are some photos from a few years ago. I did a day hike up Ralston Peak on the edge of the wilderness. I've always wanted to make it down into the basin to hike around Lake Aloha but haven't had the chance.

I just got back from Tahoe, and did a day hike up Pyramid Peak, which you can see in some of the photos from the Ralston Peak album. Haven't had a chance to process those photos yet.

You can self permit for day trips, not sure about overnights.

https://flickr.com/photos/41566708@N08/sets/72157627249003515

EPICAC fucked around with this message at 00:33 on Jul 15, 2015

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



For the poster who asked about backpacking near Sacramento. Here are some pictures from my hike up Pyramid Peak in the Desolation Wilderness. It's a day hike, but I think there are good options in Desolation Valley, which is the lake filled valley you can see in some of the pictures. I think the easiest access point is the PCT from Echo Summit. You can also take a ferry across Echo Lake that will drop you off further in, and save some hiking distance if that appeals to you.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/41566708@N08/sets/72157655638851359


Lover's Leap by EPICAC, on Flickrkr


IMG_0876 by EPICAC, on Flickr


Pyramid Peak Summit Block by EPICAC, on Flickr


Mount Agassiz and Mount Price by EPICAC, on Flickr


Lake Aloha by EPICAC, on Flickr


Gefo, Toem, and Ropi Lakes by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC fucked around with this message at 17:34 on Jul 26, 2015

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



alnilam posted:

That's exactly why I use a pump - being able to pump a trickle or a puddle has saved my rear end a few times. But if you know your water sources and you know that won't be an issue, gravity filters work great


Speaking of water, one more Desolation Wilderness question (and thanks for the help so far!).
Are the streams there still flowing, or is all the water locked up in the lakes at this point? Should a pump filter be enough, or should I use chem treatment too?

When I was there in early July the streams were flowing. I could hear the stream in Rocky Canyon during my hike, and Pyramid Creek was flowing behind my wife's family's cabin. This was after a week of rain, but from what others in her family have said Pyramid Creek has been flowing all summer.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



talktapes posted:

Yesterday I finished up the 48 4k New Hampshire list on Mt. Moriah.



Feels kinda weird, I've been chipping away at them almost every summer or fall weekend (except when on call for work) since June last year. It started out as an abstract goal that may or may not get completed eventually and now it's actually done. Think I'm gonna take a break from lists for a while and do a lot of backcountry camping/remote peaks next year since they generally were the most fun to do.

Congrats! I'm currently working on finishing the winter 48. I'd like to finish this winter, but I don't thin it's likely since we have a one year old at home. I'm not able to get out most weekends like I was in the past. Plus I've left myself with some difficult peaks for the finish. I should be able to get Moosilauke and the Osceolas this winter, but completely time and weather dependent are Zealand and the Bonds, and Monroe, Washington, and Jefferson. We took our baby up to Lonesome Lake Hut on Friday, and I'm getting the itch.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Made it to New Hampshire for my first 4000 footer since last winter. I did Moosilauke via the Glencliff Trail. It was a beautiful day, great views from the summit. That's 39/48 on the NH winter 4000 footer list. I'll get to 41 this winter (The Osceolas), but the last 7 peaks are Washington, Monroe and Jefferson and Zealand and the Bonds. So I'm not sure if I'll get a weather window for the Presidentials, or have the time to get in the long Zealand & Bonds hike.


IMG_1137 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_1155 by EPICAC, on Flickr


IMG_1159 by EPICAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Levitate posted:

hike naked to cut down on cloths weight

If you do this aerodynamics becomes a HUGE factor, you'll need a full body shave to really get the full benefits. Plus, depending on how hairy you are, you'll save a few ounces too.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Internet Explorer posted:

+1 for "have Osprey pack and Osprey hydration bladder, works great"

Just don't leave them in the sun. Apparently hydration bladders do not like that.

I'll be the dissenting voice here on Osprey hydration bladders. I love the design of the bladders compared to the camel back bladders that I own, but they just don't have the durability. In April of 2015 I bought a small Osprey pack for run commuting that came with a 2.5L bladder. I used it to commute about 3X a week, and for water on longer runs when it was hot (20-35 miles). It sprung a leak on a run in the first week of June, the seam came undone at the very bottom of the bladder. I got a replacement bladder from REI the next week, and used it with the same frequency. It sprung a leak in the same location the first week in September about 5 miles into an 18 mile run. I contacted Osprey CS, and was told this was a known issue that they were trying to fix. Maybe they hold up better for hiking, but they're not cut out for running.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



bongwizzard posted:

I cannot even imagine going back to a tent after getting used to my hammock. It is so nice I have found myself wishing for it when stuck in lovely hotels.

I've read a bunch of comments like this heaping praise on hammocks, but it seems like it would only be comfortable if you're a back sleeper. I'm a stomach sleeper, and can't imagine a hammock would work for me. Is it possible to comfortably sleep on your stomach in a hammock?

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



FireTora posted:

Yeah, was pretty windy late morning/early afternoon Saturday for the upper half from Castle Rock. Stayed dry besides the occasional misting though. Since there was so much fog we just pushed through and got to Waterman Gap fairly early and got set up before the rain. It started raining around 7 pm, we left camp around 10 am and got to Big Basin HQ around 2:30 with the rain only varying from light to pouring the entire time. All our rain pants and jackets had completely soaked through by the end but we had a great time. I think the trail from Waterman to Big Basin was prettier overall but the fog on Saturday left no view.

I have a feeling we might have bailed if it had been raining on Saturday like it had on Sunday though, and any future 2 night trips are probably going to become one night trips if it's that rainy again.

We're planning on day hiking the last bit from Big Basin to the coast sometime in the near future so we can complete it, and then move on to other trails.

I've been fixated on this trail since it was posted earlier in the thread. We're visiting my wife's family in San Jose over Christmas, and I really want to run this in a single shot. I just need to convince someone to drop me off and pick me up. How was the footing? The pictures all make it look pretty smooth, but it's hard to get a sense from just a few photos.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



A perfect weather forecast on Friday, and the need to distract myself from the inauguration prompted me to take a vacation day and get to the mountains. I've been working on the winter New Hampshire 4000 footers for the last few years, and want to finish this year. I managed to cross Washington, Monroe, and Jefferson off the list with a 12.5 mile hike with about 5100' of elevation gain. Now I just need Zealand and West Bond (a 23 mile day!).

The weather was absolutely perfect. It was sunny with clear skies, and an undercast down in the valleys. Visibility was great, I could see Mount Mansfield, Camel's Hump, and Ellen and Abraham in Vermont. Temps were in the low 30s, and there was only a light breeze on the summits. The average wind speed for Mount Washington in January is 46 mph. Conditions were mixed, I used every form of traction I brought, microspikes, snowshoes, and crampons.

Full Album
Strava Link


Monroe-Washington Col by EPICAC, on Flickr


Washington from Monroe by EPICAC, on Flickr


Francoia Ridge in the Distance by EPICAC, on Flickr


The Great Gulf by EPICAC, on Flickr


Ridges and Undercast by EPICAC, on Flickr


Monticello Lawn by EPICAC, on Flickr


Mount Washington by EPIAC, on Flickr

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Hughmoris posted:

Awesome pictures! Were you the only one up there?

I think the weather was too nice to have the mountains to myself. I saw about a dozen other people, but the lot was full when I got back to my car. I hiked the first hour with a woman who left the parking lot when I did, and ended up hiking the ridge from the summit of Monroe to Jefferson with a another guy and his dog.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Hughmoris posted:

What (if any) type of smart devices do you hike with? I currently just have an Android phone but I'd like to start logging my hiking routes, distances etc... Being new to the scene, I really don't know what type of features work well for hiking.

I used to use an app on my iPhone with downloadable topo maps for the lower 48, but they stopped supporting it. I liked the ability to see your position on the map. Currently I use a Garmin 230, which I primarily have for running. It doesn't have maps functionality, but I have the "Other" activity set up for hiking the first screen has distance, time, and current elevation fields. The second screen has lap distance, lap time and current elevation fields. I hit the lap button at every trail junction. Combined with study of a map before a hike, and consultation during, it's usually enough to roughly place myself.

I have my Garmin Connect account synced with Strava, which is what I use to keep track of my runs/hikes/etc.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Hughmoris posted:

Also, being new to hiking, what is the etiquette when meeting people on narrow trails? Does the person heading downhill typically have the right away, or the person heading uphill? Or does no one really give a poo poo either way?

I'm not sure what the etiquette is, but typically when I'm going uphill I'm happy to yield to downhill traffic, and it seems that when I'm going downhill most uphill hikers are happy for a short break.

EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Until a couple of weeks ago I would have said Hale was my least favorite 4K, but I ran a loop over the Twins, Zealand, and Hale. I really liked the Lend A Hand Trail from Zealand Falls Hut, and descending via the Firewarden's Tail was fun. Both are much more interesting than the short way up.

I've finished both the regular and winter list, and I think running them will be my next project. I think that will allow chaining some peaks together into interesting loops, and some alternate approaches. I think that will actually make Owl's head fun since it's a nice flat approach. I've knocked out 6 this month, but that was because my wife and toddler were out of town two weekends in a row.

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EPICAC
Mar 23, 2001



Rob Rockley posted:

So Im finally going to Idyllwild in a couple weeks for an isolated staycation, going to try and climb Mt. San Jacinto from there. Biggest climb Ive ever been on was from sea level to about 7000 with no ill effects. Im planning on waiting a couple days there(about 5000) before climbing, but for someone whos never gone near 10,000 feet before how much misery should I expect up there with altitude issues?

Im gonna go get some great pictures real soon hopefully.

Its highly variable person to person. 10,000 after only a couple of days at 5000 might be rough, it might not.

I live at sea level, and do most of my hiking at low elevations. My wifes family has a cabin near Lake Tahoe at around 6100. I have no issues going there directly from sea level. Ive gone up to 9200 the day after arriving at there. My only issue was that the hike seemed like extra effort. No headaches or anything, just felt hard.

Another time I went to a meeting in CO, and went from sea level to staying at 8400. In that case walking uphill from the conference site to my hotel was noticeably difficult, and I had mild headaches for a day or two. After 5 days, I did a couple of 14ers, and only noticed the altitude once I got up around 12k, again in that case it only felt harder than usual.

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