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Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

I'm going to be in Lake Tahoe in August, and I've been toying with the idea of hiking part of the PCT from Tahoe to Yosemite. Does anyone have any thoughts on that stretch of trail?

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Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Verman posted:

Also there are no brown bears in the cascades except the very far north cascades and far north east Washington.
The cascades are home to black bears and are way different than brown/grizzlies. They're mostly scavengers and avoid confrontation. They can be scared off easily with loud noises and groups. The way to avoid them is to take care of your food and scented items.

Pack out all your food and don't drop scraps. Keep it all in a bear bin and away from camp. Don't cook or eat in camp if you're really worried about bears.

To be honest it's something that everyone has in their mind but rarely encounters.

Don't worry about cougars. You will never see one until it's too late and they rarely attack people let alone groups.

This is all good advice. The average weight of cougar is approximately the same as the average weight of a human male. Lots of people fight them off, not that they can't kill you really good. The majority of all deaths from cougars has been to kids and women. Just be aware of your surroundings in cougar territory. They obviously prefer to stalk their prey and attack from behind before they are noticed. It's very very rare you'll have an issue with them, and if you're not travelling alone then the chances are infinitesimal.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Looking at going to Redwood National Park and exploring it a bit. Is it really not busy enough there that there are no reservations for back country camping? Looking at going near the end of August.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

lime rind posted:

Any tips on saving knees when hiking downhill? Going uphill I can feel my muscles do all the work, but going downhill seems to put all the work on my knees rather than muscles.

Walking poles are supposed to reduce the impact by 10% or so. Lots of people I know happily use them, and I have some myself. Other than that work on your upper leg muscles.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Can anyone give me some advice on a good 2 day, 1 night hike in Washington state, or even northern Oregon? Going to stuck there next week and would love to hear some suggestions.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

MMD3 posted:

McNeil Pt on Mt Hood, my favorite summer hike

That looks awesome, thank you :)

Does anyone else have any other recommendations? I have a week to fill.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Gorgeous pics. That first one is amazing.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Look Sir Droids posted:

REI is running a sale. Got any recommendations for a decent warm/fall weather hiking boot? I have some Scarpa crux approach shoes that are comfortable as hell, but I'd like something with ankle support if the price is right.

I've been using these Zamberlan's for a couple years: http://www.rei.com/product/774690/zamberlan-vioz-gt-hiking-boots-mens

I've hiked hundreds of km in them in rain and snow and they are great. I wear them snowshoeing and they stay warm. Very, very comfortable. I often just wear them as my regular day shoe because I am a vagabond and hate travelling with a bunch of pairs of shoes. I just make sure to keep them nice and waxed up. Only time I have noticed my feet getting wet (other than sweat, the one downside of a waterproof hiking boot) is while on a multi-day hike through very wet meadows. I highly recommend them.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Good Dog posted:

The girlfriend and I are going to be in San Francisco for the weekend and were interested in getting a hike in one of the days, anyone have any recommendations on fun/cool day hikes that can be done in the area? We won't have access to a car so anything we do would have been be accessed via walking or bus/train. It looks like the 76x is the bus we want to take, as it puts us wherever we want along golden gate park. Any must sees? Looking at yelp reviews for hiking stuff, it looks like the Marin Headlands are the most popular thing to do.

Last year I stayed at the marin headlands hostel, and it was great. I think there is a bus out there on the weekends, but the hike in is pretty nice too. Some nice walks along the ocean with cool cliffs and so on. It is across the golden gate bridge and so kind of out of the way. If you were to start at the city side of the GG bridge and hike into Marin it's about 8-9km, and then another 4-5km hiking around the beaches/cliffs etc, though there are several trails around there that you could easily increase that distance.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

fritzov posted:

Got myself my first hiking boots yesterday and I'm seem to be having some issue with rubbing on both feets a bit above my "big toe". Would u guess this will give in with time or should i return the shoes to store?

These are the shoes http://www.sportiva.com/products/footwear/hikingbackpacking/thunder-iii-gtx

It depends what you mean by "above your big toe". Do you mean at the tip of your toe? Hiking boots will break in a bit, but if they don't fit properly I'd try a different size.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

What's the appeal of quilts? Do they weigh significantly less than sleeping bags?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

I usually track my hikes using my iphone and a tracking app, but I am thinking of doing some two week+ hikes and I was thinking it might make more sense to just buy a cheap GPS because I imagine the battery life is much better. Does anyone have any suggestions for something cheap and simple?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

This debate reoccurs but I think boots are best for muddy/marshy environments as well as most hiking off trail. There is nothing worse than a shoe full of rocks and dirt and cacti and whatever else that pours into it when going up an unstable slope. This can be mitigated by wearing gaiters, of course.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

cheese posted:

That sounds like a place where your boots will probably end up wet as well. It all seems to boil down to "Boots try to keep your feet from getting wet, but are pretty useless if they fail at it" while "Trail runners don't even bother trying, but dry out fast and are usable while wet".

You hate boots, we get it, haha...I've hiked for days and days on a trail that had three inches of mud, my feet were dry and comfy in boots, but I can't imagine the same could be said for trail runners. I think trail runners are probably best for most hikers who are just doing nice trails and day hikes, even longer hikes on nice trails, but there is some terrain the boot is just superior.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

I am going to buy some trail runners for my next 200km hike. If they let me down I'm holding this thread personally responsible.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Any recommendations for cheap synthetic long sleeved shirts? Button up or not. Also interested in hearing recommendations on gaiters. I have a decent pair but they up to my knee almost. Looking for something a bit less obtrusive.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Does anyone have any experience hiking with goats that would share some thoughts about it?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

mastershakeman posted:

I'd rank them in between cats and dogs in terms of ease of controlling them and getting them to follow you on the trail while leashed. You might think they'd be great for hauling your gear but they really aren't.

What kind of pace can they keep? There isn't a ton of info online but some of it suggests they'll just follow you if they are bonded to you at a young age. I'm not necessarily interested in using one to pack things, though that would be cool on longer trips.

Who wouldn't want a goat entourage while hiking?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

alnilam posted:

If you are going to hike with your goat, that rules.

I don't have a goat yet, but I was thinking about getting a pair of goats and in the process of that it occurred to me that goats climb mountains pretty good and wouldn't it be cool if they'd come for adventures with me.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Sierra Nevadan posted:

Anyone successfully use bear spray past its expiration?

You're probably good for at least a little while. I let some off from a canister that expired over a year ago and it worked fine. However, my dad was in a standoff with a cougar a few years ago and his expired bear spray just came out in a dribble of foam, so that's something to keep in mind too, haha.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Pryor on Fire posted:

Is there a distance/altitude tracking app that is more efficient than Strava? 8 hours of hiking and Strava used roughly half the battery on an iPhone 6, seems kind of excessive to me.

That sounds not really that bad. You could try it in airplane mode if you weren't already. My iphone 4s (half the battery I know) gets down to around 20-30% for a 7 hour hike. I use Endomondo, though. I am interested in hearing if there is something more efficient too.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Aquatic Giraffe posted:

This was my first time using my new Camelbak, are there any tips for drying them after cleaning them out? It seems like the way they're designed would be a haven for mildew.

I let mine sit with water for weeks and just give it a hot rinse and I go. Just don't put anything other than water in there. My brother put beer in his. Yeah.

Echoing the using a bit of bleach to rinse it out with once in a while.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Hackan Slash posted:

I'm going on a week long backpacking trip and am going to bring my phone for pictures, GPS, etc.

What's the best way to keep it charged? Rigging up a solar cell to my pack? Just getting the biggest possible external battery? That charging wood stove?

I have a 10000 mAh external battery about the size of a big smartphone and it charges my iPhone 4s around 8 times. If you have a bigger phone it might do you for a week depending how much you use it. Definitely the most painless way to go.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Wuntvor posted:

So how stupid exactly is it to go hiking alone in the mountains? I know this is a very general questions, but I've seen very varying opinions between "Don't ever do it" to "You'll be fine". Now, I am not talking about mountain climbing or doing the most difficult routes ever devised, but just some regular stuff, following marked paths etc. No dangerous wildlife either.

I did a hike in Montenegro in Durmitor national park which was probably one of the hardest things I've done my entire life but also one of the best at the same time. Some places where I had to use my hands and hold onto a rope, but otherwise, I never really felt like I was in particular danger. And that is with me not having that much experience and not being used to the mountain at all (in the area of Germany that I'm living it's all flat countryside pretty much). If I had actually known about how hard that path, I probably would not have attempted it, my guide said it was difficult but still made it sound easier. Oh well.

Anyway, I am not in Bosnia and looking to do some more hiking, and I think the routes should be a lot less frequented so I'm still not 100% sure if I should do it alone. I mean, it should actually be easier than the hiking I did in Montenegro, but still. The landmine problem here is fortunately somewhat easy to avoid as there is good information available as to the areas where there might actually still be some, and I won't be going anywhere near those areas. Of course, normal safety precautions such as letting someone know where I'm going, bringing rain gear and stuff like that I am going to do no matter what. Basically just wanted to hear some opinions about hiking alone

I think it's pretty much quite safe and I know many people do it and survive. That being said I read too many stories about people hiking alone who get in trouble and die that would have survived if someone was there to help them. They found a hiker last week who was hiking by himself in Alaska who it looks like slipped in a creek and became disable somehow and died of hypothermia (is what they thought at the time, haven't followed up on it.) Also, the majority of deaths by cougar in NA have been people hiking alone. Not sure about bear attacks but I think you'll have a better outcome if you're with someone. These are rare things, but worth considering.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Pryor on Fire posted:

That article is pretty timely for me, I was backpacking last weekend and it was a total shitshow. Off leash dog charged and bit me on wilderness space, then a bunch of frat boys built a huge rear end bonfire at the high mountain lake I was going to camp near and were doing bong rips and throwing beer cans in the lake, so I moved on and found another spot that seemed nice and set up my tent then realized someone had thrown a poo poo ton of food they didn't want to eat behind some trees so that was rotting 20 feet away and I wasn't worried about bears before but kind of was then, whatever it was fine then another off leash dog charged me fortunately this one didn't bite, and then on day three hiking out some dumbshit millennials were flying a drone as annoyingly as possible and thought it would be funny to zoom it over people hiking on the trail then the battery died and it crashed 50 feet ahead of me on the trail and would have hit me if the battery died two seconds earlier, nearly got into a fist fight with them after yelling at them for being stupid dipshits.

I mean Indian Peaks is always kind of a shitshow but geez it sure seems to be getting worse every year. I think I'm going to start giving up on anything near the front range and head out to Utah or Idaho or something for trips, I'm just so tired of all the dipshits.

Is bear spray legal in your state? If a dog ran up to me aggressively and bit me I'd probably spray it down, maybe even if it hadn't bit me depending on the circumstances. There isn't really an excuse for that.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

A coffee tin filled with gasoline.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Never kill a fish. Pet them lovingly and then release them to the wild.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Hungryjack posted:

Pot has a much better weight:effect ratio

Sure, but what about heroin?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Internet Explorer posted:

I'm pretty sure everyone other than frat boys knows that Fireball is terrible.

My mom drinks fireball.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

I hiked a 48km semi-challenging trail last year with my brother who wore steel-toed shoes. He also had an incredibly light-weight down sleeping bag and temperatures were down to 0 Celsius. I went on a multi-day hike with another friend and he didn't bring a sweater/jacket even though we were hiking into the mountains. People...don't think.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Hiking in marshy/mucky areas is an ideal situation for poles. you can plant a pole somewhere stable and hop around the muck without worrying about slipping.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

I prefer flip locks. There is also a pretty noticeable difference between carbon fibre and aluminium when it comes to weight. Not that lighter is necessarily better, but it's worth testing out a pair or two to decide what you like.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Anyone have any swell tips for synthetic button-up shirts that aren't $60? Long-sleeved would be preferable, but not totally necessary.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

bongwizzard posted:

That is awful to hear.

Last summer I had three separate fuckups that ended with me having over a hundred mosquito/tick bites per gently caress up. poo poo was super unpleasant and this year I am going to just cover myself in poison if that is what it takes. Or just quit hiking and just kayak all summer.

Where are you hiking?

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Yeah, I have never seen ticks that small and I am in southern BC. I have a black dog this year so that should be fun.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

bongwizzard posted:



Did some ill advised thunderstorm fishing and wad rewarded with this. I have literally never seen a rainbow like this before.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQSNhk5ICTI

Sure thing, bongwizzard.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

taco show posted:

Hey hiking thread, I need some advice. A friend has asked me to do the Four Pass Loop with him the weekend of July 29.

It looks amazing and I think I want to give it a shot, but I have very little experience hiking (only day trips and car camping) and the "difficulty:strenuous" is seriously scaring me. I'm willing to train up for it- I'm in ok shape and I live in Chicago- but I don't really know where to begin or if it's even realistic to go for it.

Looking at the elevation profile it will probably be strenuous, like it says, especially with a full pack. If you can find somewhere near Chicago where you can ascend 1km(3000 feet) in a hike, or even half that, with a full pack, you can test yourself. Not to mention you have a big ascent three times in that hike. Personally I think it's doable if you work out from now until then and you're able to take your time on the hike. If your pal is go go go then it's going to suck for you.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Maybe for one night, but I don't really see the appeal of the trade off. I will carry a stove that weighs a few ounces so that I can have a hot meal. It's strange to me that someone wouldn't want to. I remember reading an interview with an ultra-light hiker that had hiked the PCT without a stove. He said he'd never do it again, but that sounds just horrid to me.

Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

What volume packs do you guys usually use on multi-day hikes, say 2-3 nights?

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Tsyni
Sep 1, 2004

I love you boy, One Pack, always.


Lipstick Apathy

Hungryjack posted:

If I were to buy a new pack of that size, I'd be very tempted to get one of Osprey's packs that has that Anti-gravity harness system. My wife had the Aura 50 and it was ventilated and comfortable as hell.

Yeah, I've been eyeing the atmos because lots of reviews seem to be a fan of the comfort/ventilation.

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