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Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Hiked up to Hidden Basin just below Vesper Peak (Mountain Loop Highway, WA) a couple weeks ago. Been in the process of rebuilding my hiking blog after I accidentally deleted the database.

Anyway, here are a few pics. Full trip report here: http://mycrookedpath.com/blog/2015/09/07/vesper-lake-hidden-basin-headlee-pass





Also, I recently completed Section J of the Pacific Crest Trail between Stevens Pass and Snoqualmie Pass (Washington). I'm currently still writing up the trip report on the 75 mile solo trip. It was loving rad.

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Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...


That looks like it would be some epic backcountry splitboarding.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

I solo hiked Section J of the Pacific Crest Trail in Washington State southbound from Stevens Pass to Snoqualmie Pass and finally finished the write-up. It was 75 miles of pure awesome that I had planned on tackling in 5 days and ended up doing in 4. Full write up is here if anyone is interested: http://mycrookedpath.com/blog/pacific-crest-trail-section-j-stevens-pass-to-snoqualmie-pass-part-1/ It's two parts since there are a million pictures ...

Here are some pics:


Just lounging in camp




Chimney Rock (right) and Lemah Mtn. (left)


The PCT on the Chikamin Traverse under the 4 Brothers


Cloudy


The Kendall Katwalk into nothingness

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Bottom Liner posted:

40L packs are plenty for ultralight setups. My gear isn't even especially ultralight and I can fit everything in a 32L pack comfortably. My setup is 14lbs before food/water.

What does your 14lb setup include? I'm always curious what ultra-lighters pack and what they leave at home to keep the weight down.

Also, a 40L pack is fine for most multi-day trips. I have an Osprey Aether 65 that I never come close to filling (even on my PCT trip). However, I hate having stuff tacked to the outside of my pack so the extra room is nice and I can fit everything inside.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Bottom Liner posted:

Fantastic looking innovation for sleeping pads. drat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jv9Gghy6Lj4

That's pretty sweet, but it weighs almost 2lbs!

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Bagged Glacier Peak, 4th highest volcano in Washington State last weekend. Three of us started out from the North Fork Sauk River trailhead on Friday July 1st for a 3 day trip with aspirations to summit Glacier Peak and knock it off our respective bucket lists. 2 of us made it.

Highlights:
- hitting the perfect weather window and having a sunny summit day
- getting the summit all to ourselves
- black bear sighting on the way to the TH
- hit by a hummingbird
- attacked by a confused marmot

Lowlights:
- Lost a compadre on the way in
- 13 hour summit day (don't camp at pt 6400 on the Foam Creek trail and assume the 6 miles and 4100 feet to the summit will be easy)
- Rain on the way out
- Missing husky (some couple let their dog off the leash near the junction with the PCT. Last I saw, she was blasting up the hill having the time of her life. While we took a break at Mackinaw on the way out, the couple caught up to us, sans pooch. I hope she made it off the mountain!)

Full trip report and LOTS of pics here:
Glacier Peak Trip Report on MyCrookedPath.com

Some teaser pics:


Near White Pass


Sunrise from the tent on summit day


I AM VICTORIOUS!


My favorite beer, even better at 10,541 feet!






Near White Pass, on the way out. Quite a change in weather.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Hungryjack posted:

So Kammok just announced the Kickstarter for its suspendable tent It's a lot to take in, but for a situation like I had this summer where I took the hammock gear because i wanted it and the tent gear because I had to, this might be a good compromise.

Backer price is $300, which I'm not ready to pull the trigger on just now, but it's interesting.

I'd def be interested in seeing this in the field. At 4.5lbs, it's not a bad weight for 2 people (and splitting the tent up) but I'll definitely keep using my 1-man quarter dome on solo trips.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Verman posted:


I just hiked Mt Dickerman which was 8 miles and 4k gain with one of the best summit payoffs I've had in Washington.


Totally different experience on Dickerman last month for me:


In other news, knocked another item off my bucket list over the holiday weekend:


Solo ascent of Mt. Adams, second highest point in Washington State, 12,276 feet.

Totally ready for Rainier, but Baker is next!

Mt. St. Helens, 8,366'
Glacier Peak, 10,541'
Mt. Adams, 12,276'
Mt Baker, 10,781'
Mt. Rainier, 14,411'

List should be complete this summer.

Braincloud fucked around with this message at 22:56 on Jul 5, 2017

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Verman posted:

Wow, that sucks. The view up there is incredible and that would be a pretty grueling hike with that much snow and no payoff.

I've seen a bunch of pics and it does indeed look awesome. I've bagged a lot of the peaks on the Mountain Loop though - Pugh, Forgotten, Del Campo, Gothic, Vesper, Silver Tip so I've gotten my fair share of vistas. Also, I totally recommend Pugh - if you thought Glacier Peak looked close from Dickerman, you feel like you could jump over to it from Pugh.

It was actually pretty cool up on Dickerman with it socked in. You had no sense of scale and staring into the grey was just weird - like there was no contrast. It was akin to being in a pitch black room where you keep blinking to try to get your eyes to focus on anything, but it was light out. Staring down into the abyss was a great way to induce vertigo!

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Had an epic time summiting Mt. Baker (10,781') this past weekend via the Easton Glacier route. Third highest volcano in Washington. Camped around 7000' and with an alpine start at 1:15am, we topped out at 4:45am just in time for a gorgeous sunrise. Climbed the whole way under a full moon to-boot. A bit harder than my climb of Mt. Adams, even though Baker is about 2000' lower. I think it was the combo of rope management and snaking our way through a bunch of open crevasses. Oh, also snagged Baker's secondary Sherman Peak (10, 160') while we were up there.

Have some pix:


Deming Glacier from near our camp - picture doesn't really show the ridiculous angle of that icefall


View from camp


Sunrise summit success


Sherman Peak above the crater, Glacier Peak can be seen in the distance in the saddle between Sherman and that spike of a rock


Check out this stinkin' hole (Sherman Crater) - Baker is still very much an active volcano


Baker's summit from the top of Sherman Peak. You can see the line of climbers heading up the Roman Wall on the far left.

Braincloud fucked around with this message at 22:27 on Jul 10, 2017

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...



Sunrise this morning over Little Tahoma from the top of Disappointment Cleaver (12,300') on Rainier. Sadly, the Cleaver lived up to its name - route to the summit was borked due to a collapsed snow plug on Saturday and a new route hadn't been found yet. My buddy and I hung out at Camp Muir (10,000' ft) on Saturday and then moved up to Ingraham Flats (11,000') on Sunday in hopes that we'd get good news from the guides up there. No good news was to be had so we slept in today and did a hike up to the top of the Cleaver for sunrise.

Here's looking south from the Cleaver. Ingraham Flats camp is in the lower left (you can see the tour tents, our independent tent is the invisible speck south of the tourists). Camp Muir is visible through Cadaver Gap in the lower/mid right. Mt. Adams is chillin' in the distance.



Good news, they found a route this afternoon so we're going back up next weekend to try again.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Last March I turned 40 and made it my goal to summit Mt. Rainier. I've lived in Washington for my whole life and grew up in the mountains camping and hiking. Last weekend, we attempted to climb but were thwarted by a collapse along the route, making it impossible to get to the summit without some serious shenanigans (which we weren't prepared for). We hung out at high camp, climbed to the top of Disappointment Cleaver (12,300') and then went home after deciding to wait a week and see if the guide services would find a new way to the top. They did the next day of course.

Fast forward to this past weekend: yesterday I completed my goal and summited Rainier at 5:45am. My buddy and I did it as a two-man team and were the first on the summit after leaving high camp (Ingraham Flats, 11,100 feet) at about 1am. We were on the Disappointment Cleaver route which is normally the "freeway" to the top but, due to the late season and many collapses along the way, it's pretty lovely up there and the route is about twice as long and drops elevation along the way. Rainier also marks the completion of one of my bucket list items as I've now summited all the volcanos in Washington state!


Sunrise from 14,411'


Mt. Adams and the western edge of Rainier's crater


Prolly shouldn't stop here, eh?


Just another standard ladder crossing


My buddy climbing up the Wall of the North

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

So I finished the write-up of my climb up Rainier Ė if you're interested in reading, here's a link to my blogpost:

http://mycrookedpath.com/blog/mt-rainier-drat-what-do-i-do-now/

There's more pictures and a neat virtual flyby from my GPX file on there.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...


WTF is this glorious rock? I must climb it!

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

underage at the vape shop posted:

Do you guys have any recomendations for small tents I could take hiking? I live in Queensland Australia, so it doesn't need to be able to withstand snow, but it does need to be able to survive a tropical thunderstorm (strong wind, keeps me dry in torrential rain).

I love my REI quarter dome 1; itís roomy, sturdy, and pretty weather tight. I used to bivy but that sucks after a while - thereís something nice about having room to move around while in your bag. I picked up the Quarterdome on a whim and wonít use my bivy any more. The QD is super light and weighs about the same as my bivy to.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Boiling water still has merit other than nostalgia- I boil to filter when Iím in alpine areas and the only source of water is snow. Since Iím melting snow, I just bring it to a full boil. I usually leave the filter at home on these trips.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Seattlite here: I layer all year round, in town or in the mountains. Goretex shell if raining or threat of rain(OR Furio shell) with a down puffy mid (if needed), a tech mid zip-up (OR Radiant Hoodie - I live in these pretty much every day) and then whatever shirt Iím wearing that day. If itís exceptionally cold out, Iíll rock a tee or Hoodie and my Feathered Friends Volant down puffy cuz gently caress it, that poo poo is warrrrrrrm and waterproof and a down puffy is pretty much the standard Seattle uniform.

If Iím going out for a fancy evening where I know I wonít be outside much more than from the Lyft to the place of hangout, Iíll wear whatever warm dressy coat I have.

But layers are great and provide the most versatility.

Also, note: I work for in tech, cycle to work pretty much every day rain or shine, and mostly wear jeans and a tee after changing out of my commuter clothes so, I may not be the ďstyleĒ youíre going for.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

I suspect the Longmire gate may be delayed in the morning and, as suggested above, that may hinder a full run trip to Muir. Hiking buddy has also fallen a bit out of shape, etcetera, so I'm holding "Ice axe practice yay!" in reserve as a backup plan a few thousand feet above Panorama.

Maybe I'll even post a picture of we survive and indeed, sigh, I should probably just buy crampons and plan to do Adams.


Edit: Weather cleared as expected for the first 90min but turned into a wall of white soon after which seemed to follow us down. Visibility was mostly 10--20ft until dropping back to ~6000ft but by then it was snowing everywhere. Road was worse outbound than in the morning. Very nice snowshoeing and ice axe mini practice up some of the hills.

Late to this but FYI:

Iíve done parking lot to Muir with a full summit pack in 3 hours - this was in September, and being in peak climbing shape. Plan on 4-5 hours to get up there in full blown winter on snowshoes. I personally wouldnít even consider it without my split board since skinning up and snowboarding back down is wayyyyyy faster.

That being said, snowshoeing around Paradise and up to Pano Point is pretty awesome.

Adams is a great mountain to climb due to it being relatively non-technical. It IS still a big mountain so donít get lulled into a false sense of confidence. Depending on how conditions are this coming summer, you can do Adams with just microspikes (I used my crampons, but thatís because I already own them).

Oh, and if/when you head up to Rainier/Paradise and/or Adams, mountain-forecast.com is an awesome resource for planning.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Alan_Shore posted:

Solar panels just aren't very good. They're heavy and don't give a great charge in the woods. On the AT last year people were sending them home. My phone lasted a ridiculous amount of time in airplane mode, and my candy bar Anker battery pack filled it up twice before a recharge. I was also watching movies at night in my hammock. Just bring a rechargeable battery pack, use airplane mode and download pixoff for Android.

Counterpoint: newer Anker solar panels are awesome and weigh less than a battery pack. Just used mine on the 3 week trek up Aconcagua and it kept my Kindle, my watch, and my phone happily full. This is most important in base camp where you have lovely WiFi that eats batteries but no power.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

svenkatesh posted:

Unrelated, how was Aconcagua? Did you have previous mountaineering experience? Did you hire a guide?

Aconcagua was pretty epic. Itís definitely an expedition type climb. The biggest issue is altitude since itís almost 23,000í (~7000m). Technical experience isnít required but being in top conditioning is. No ropes but my crampons def got a workout.

I went with a guided group for a couple reasons: my buddy signed up with Alpine Ascents before I decided to join and going with a guide service removed a LOT of the hassle. Yeah, itís more expensive, but when you show up and donít have to worry about logistics and permits and meals and just can focus on carrying your own gear and enjoying the climb I felt it was totally worth it.

Iíve done mountaineering here in Washington but this was my first guided trip and also the first time Iíve had to deal with that kind of elevation. You can get away without acclimatization on Rainier if youíre lucky/quick enough.

We did the Vacas Valley route in to Aconcagua and then came out the normal Horcones Valley route which was great since we pretty much circumnavigated the mountain on our climb. Itís pretty funny that it took us like 2 weeks to go from 1500í to the summit and then 2 days to hike out. Dropping ~6000í from high camp Colera (19,500í) to the base camp at Plaza de Mulas (14,000í) on a foot of fresh snow was awesome.

Also, summit day was bluebird until about an hour after we began our descent; a storm rolled in, complete with thunder and lightning and a shitload of snow. Nothing like hustling down a lovely 45 degree slope in a whiteout with lightning crackling all around when youíre girded in metal crampons and carrying ice axes!

I have about 1000 pictures to go thru still, but Iíll post some when I get a chance.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

BaseballPCHiker posted:

I'm thankful I had it marked on my google calendar to apply because after 8 long years I finally got a lottery permit!!!!

I'm thrilled! I've been waiting to get one for so long. I didnt get a core zone permit though, just one for the Eightmile/Caroline Zone. So I'm not %100 sure that I'll take it.

Eightmile isnít as popular as Colchuck/Core and not connected either but should still be a beauty of a trip. I did NOT get a permit this year but Iíve been lucky in the past and had Core permits 3 years in a row. This year, Iím planning a thru hike day trip.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

You can snag Dragontail and Little Annapurna in a really long day from the Colchuck TH (not ideal but Iíve done it).

But yeah, to be able to explore McClellan or climb Prusik, a Core permit is the way to go. Also, just being able to stay in the upper or middle basin makes exploring that whole area a lot more convenient than running laps up and down Asgard.

Coming in from Snow is just dumb.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

n8r posted:

I've been into 8 mile and it's super pretty. On a weekend it'll have a fair number of people, so just be prepared for that and don't let it ruin a good time. I think spending a few days there is a fine idea going up to Windy Pass looks neat.

edit: If you want to go to random other places you could go to Holden Village via spider meadows or check out the Chelan Sawtooth wilderness - there is nobody out there.

Eightmile is also a different trailhead about 3/4 mike before the Colchuck/Stuart TH and heads west away from the Core Enchantmants. It really is a pretty separate area.

The Chelan Sawtooths are awesome.

Also, if you want a great hike with lots of peakbagging opportunities, check out Gardner Meadow outside of the Methow. Itís like 10 miles in to this ridiculous meadow and nobody goes out there.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Haha no it didn't look like terrible Photoshop. I guess I've never heard of a fisher, but wow it really looked like Wikipedia's picture of a marten. Unfortunately this location is a desert most of the year, so it doesn't seem like either would survive. A wolverine is rather large. A few trip reports mention marmots, but I didn't know they lived much below the tree line.

Well now I have some reading to do in any case. Sorry there's no picture, but many thanks for the fuzzy suggestions!

I would put money on a marmot. They are all over the place in Sun Lakes and Dry Falls area and Ancient Lakes is the same kind of habitat. Bonus if you heard it whistling.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

theHUNGERian posted:


The more I think about it, the more I feel that a 5-day trip to Mt. Rainier would be a better first mountaineering experience. I'll have spend more time thinking about this.

If you do a guided trip on Rainier, they should be supplying all your meals. If you havenít done ANY mountaineering, Iíd suggest doing Baker first. Rainier is a BIG mountain and a lot of people donít quite grasp that fact and underestimate the skill and stamina needed. That said, a guide service will most likely get you to the top of youíre reasonably fit and conditions allow. Iíve seen people on guided teams who have gotten to Muir and could tell they completely underestimated what they had signed up for.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Nthing the hydro colloid bandage love. I always keep them in my first aid ditty bag. I have one on the bottom of my foot now after getting a large lovely blister from the half marathon I ran on Sunday. Blister tore open a mile from the finish, went to the drug store after and picked up the blister bandage. Been able to run every day since!

But seriously, they are magical.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Fall Dog posted:

Pretty sure I know how to pack light. My point was that it just seems to be an attitude of hiking is the sole purpose of a vacation or it's not. Apparently you're not entitled to a vacation with a bit of hiking halfway through because that's a crazy idea.

Plenty of options, just probably not in the park.

We did a 10 day vacation on the Big Island in Hawaii and backpacked to the top of Mauna Loa for a couple days. The rest of our luggage went to one of those U-Store it type places and cost $5 for a secure locker.

We chose that over hotel storage since we didnít have our hotel figured out yet for after the climb.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Verman posted:

Photos of my hike to Rampart Lakes last weekend.

Mt Rainier over Lake Lillian


Looking down on Rampart Lakes




On the return, looking south from Rampart Ridge


Oh good, itís melting out nicely up there! How were the mosquitoes?

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

BeastOfExmoor posted:

Hello backpacking thread. I'm trying to figure out some things for a couple upcoming overnight trips I'm planning on doing in the Cascades. I've done plenty of camping and hiking in my life, but never overnight backpacking. Basically I'm trying to figure out what I'll need for spending the night at the base of Glacier Peak (6000-7000ft, no I'm not climbing the mountain) and on a 5000ft ridge a bit farther south. Obviously weather is unpredictable, but I'm assuming I'm looking at 40s-50s overnight at this time of year?

Are you doing the White Pass>Pilot Ridge Loop? Iím doing that in 2 weeks. Itís gorgeous up there.

I summited Glacier a couple years ago. We camped just past White Pass and not quite into the Glacier Basin area. It didnít get too chilly in September but be prepared for the weather. It was foggy, and wet, rained, and then gave us the most gorgeous hot bluebird day for our summit push. Next day it poured again.

My normal overnight kit includes a layering system (base layer, mid layer, down puffy, goretex shell) that I can mix and match and will handle any weather the Cascades throw in the summer (actually, winter too). A good beanie is nice in the evening as well as a pair of light gloves. Pants, I bring a pair of polypro long underwear to throw on under my zip-off hiking pants if I need too.

Bugs have been bad this year so far, so be prepped for that as well.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

BeastOfExmoor posted:

Thanks for the advice.

No time for any cool loops or anything very extensive I'm afraid. I'm going up to look for birds that typically only occur at high altitudes occur only rarely on the west of the cascade crest. I'll just basically be getting the right habitat and looking around as long as possible, sleep, do it again in the morning and return home.

As far as sleeping, is a non-insulated pad generally "safe" for above freezing temps? What about sleeping bag rating?

You should be fine with a non-insulated pad unless you park your sleeping area on the snow. I use a +25 degree down bag year round here and layer as necessary but Iím a hot sleeper so YMMV.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Verman posted:

Went for a long one yesterday to Davis peak near Roslyn. 10 miles and 4000 feet of gain. It was mostly switchbacks through the forest until the last mile where you get out into the open, walk a ridgeline until you reach the peak where you have 360 degree views of surrounding peaks and lakes. Summit chief, mt Stuart, Daniels, glacier etc.

After driving 2 hours home, my legs tightened up and I could feel that my knees, quads, IT bands and hip flexors were sore. Then we stopped at chick fil a and I killed a few sandwiches, nuggets and fries and life was good.





Heh, last time I was up Davis, we got hit with a thunderstorm outta nowhere. Had to get the gently caress off the ridge while lightning strikes hit 100 yards away and then ran down the switchbacks in a hailstorm. Good times!

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

theHUNGERian posted:

But I can't use trail runners on a glacier in Alaska. So, do I use trail runners with liner/toe socks while training to harden my feet? Or are you saying I should be using liner/toe socks with whatever footwear on the glacier?

Get a pair of mountaineering boots that fit your feet. Donít choose by brand. Donít choose by ďooh I got a good deal.Ē Donít choose by look. Get a pair that fit YOUR feet. Couple them with a pair of good wool socks (Darn Tough makes great mountaineering socks). Now wear them as much as you can before your trip. Wear them on stairs. Wear them hiking up hills. Wear them on flats. Wear them on downhills. Now accept that your feet will never be comfortable in them and they are heavy and suck. They are marginally less sucky on glaciers in crampons.

If you are going to use sock liners, know this: find out if youíre a sock liner person before your trip. Sock liners cause blisters for some people.
Itís been my experience that two layers of socks sliding on each other is a terrible terrible thing. But it works for others. Go fig! :shrug:

FWIW, I use a pair of La Sportiva Baruntse for high altitude and only wear one pair of heavy Smartwool mountaineering socks. This kept me blister free and warm climbing Aconcagua. I would supplement them with a pair of overboots for Denali. But no liners.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

MMD3 posted:

<3 how far is this from The Enchantments? is it near Leavenworth as well?

Itís a spur off the PCT up by Stevens Pass.

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Bottom Liner posted:

Just got back from Utah. What a week. I have about 1500 photos to work through and I'll write up a big post about what we did but :drat:


Zion


Bryce Canyon


Delicate Arch


What the gently caress, man. Those are amazing!

Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Here's my weekend overnight (very wide image):


Is that from Wright above Gem Lake?

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Braincloud
Sep 28, 2004

I forgot...how BIG...

Verman posted:

Adams is pretty straightforward if you choose to do it solo. I know we've talked but I don't recall, what's your crampon/ice axe experience? If you know how to, and have practiced and feel comfortable with self arrest, you should be fine. I've seen kids up there, dogs, people in trail runners etc. The only real tough area is the initial climb after lunch counter to the false summit. It's steep and gets slushy during the day. If there's still snow, get started on it as early as you can so that is hard and your crampons will get better traction.

I've watched a few people drop their nalgene and it slid all the way back down. The chutes will probably be pretty melted out but if there's enough snow people will form new ones. Don't wear your crampons when glissading. Scout the chutes on your way up. Look for rocks.

Other than that it's just a hike with a really steep snow section near the end. 2 days is standard or could be made into a long day trip for someone fast and in good shape.

Adams is completely melted out already and no snow on the route. The fire tower on the summit is fully exposed (usually doesnít happen until September).

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