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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


My wife and her brother just started the AT yesterday (going for about a month at this point); it's weird knowing I won't get any updates on how they're doing until they head into town to pick up food. In the meantime I have to work and couldn't go :geno:

She hasn't done a ton of backpacking so I'm hoping the cold and everything isn't making her miserable, but I guess she can always bail at one of the towns.

If I'm lucky though this will make her want to come backpacking with me in the west later this year

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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

She just started the AT without much backpacking experience?? That's crazy sauce! I hope it goes well for her and she falls in love with it.

We've been hiking and camping but not really backpacking together. Her brother is experienced though and she has good gear, and she's not doing the entire trail. Also, she can hopefully jump off after a week or so if she finds it miserable, but yeah I'm getting anxious on her behalf :)

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Cool, my wife and her brother are somewhere in NC now, but from what I can tell they're not stopping in Franklin.

Sounds like it's been fairly cold and wet/snowy

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Yeah, no reason at all not to sign up as a member, especially if you're outfitting yourself with a bunch of new gear now. One time joining fee and then dividends and 20% off coupons every year

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


We ran into this guy chillin' in the middle of the trail last time I hiked in the Grand Canyon

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Reformed Tomboy posted:

That guy looks huge! How loud was he rattling at you?

I actually don't remember him being really big, that picture is pretty zoomed in. But yup, just chillin' in the middle of the trail and that brought us up short, but he buggered off into a bush (where the picture was taken) and sat there buzzing for awhile. Thankfully that's probably the worst wildlife situation I've seen while backpacking in my life.

Related to gear talk, does anyone have suggestions on how to get some boots repaired? A place to send them off to or something? The cuffs on mine are ripped up and the soles probably need to be replaced, but I don't really want to buy entirely new boots.

Time Cowboy posted:

This thread needs more pictures.

I'm hoping to do a hike to this area in Idaho later this summer. Not entirely sure though, might do something in the Tetons instead. These are from the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness



Some lake we just always referred to as the "frog pond" because it has a lot of frogs



Sky High lake



Some mountain meadow around there

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Jalumibnkrayal posted:

Any sign of this stomach virus that's going around, or is it just keyboard hikers getting bent out of shape for nothing?

My wife and her brother went through there this past week and didn't report any problems

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Philip J Fry posted:

REI just sent out their anniversary sale catalog; sale runs May 17-27. Extra 20% off for members with coupon code ANNV13 (typical exclusions apply.)

Yah, 20% on full priced item

Speaking of this sale, I'm tempted by the Big Agnes Jack Rabbit SL2 tent that'll be on sale for $219, anyone have any thoughts on it? I've heard good things about their Fly Creek UL2, which of course is more expensive and lighter, but I think I'd be happy enough sacrificing some weight for a tent I can afford.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Internet Explorer posted:

Not a whole lot of talk about the REI Anniversary sale. Anyone getting anything cool?

Probably gonna get a tent, maybe the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

tempted by the Flash packs sale and the Sierra Designs Dridown sale, but probably shouldn't spend that much money right now...need a new tent more than I need those things

Also, knife chat, if you happen to be going fishing or something on your hikes, don't take a tiny knife because gutting fish with a tiny knife sucks

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Anyone have sleeping bag recommendations for something around lightweight 20-30 degree bags? I'm trying to decide if I should spend money at some point this summer to get one for a trip later this year, or just say screw it and use my dad's old Trailwise Slimline that I've used in the past...a newer, lighter bag would probably be good but on the other hand I could just be spending $300 for a pound of weight difference

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


BleakLewis posted:

It's fun to talk about because it reminds me of times out on the trail. At a certain point though you just need to pick something and use it. 99 percent of the time experience will trump any features that one piece of gear has over another. Some people just really like one type of piece of gear to and get way into it. I have a friend who is obsessed with headlamps for some reason. Has a million of them and could tell me the pros and cons of all the different models. Lot's of people seem to be that way with knives and axes too.

Personally I'd rather save myself the money on top of the line gear and just shed 5 pounds of body weight before a long hike. It's easier, cheaper, and more beneficial to just be in shape.

Yah, I just like to get some opinions and find out if anyone really loves something or has good experiences.

With my sleeping bag question, I think I'm just going to go with using my dad's old bag...I've used it before for mountain backpacking in September and it's fine, it probably just needs a good wash and some repairs to a hole that spent 20 years repaired with duct tape. Makes for kind of a fun project maybe...might be able to just patch it with some nylon tape, or maybe get some fabric and repair it, guess it depends on how much effort I want to spend. Using old gear is kind of cool/fun sometimes :)

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


You don't always realize how much heat and the sun can affect you, even if you do have enough water. The first time I went backpacking in the Grand Canyon, I had some troubles on a few days when it was just so drat hot and the sun is beating down on you and it just starts sapping your energy and making you feel terrible

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Currently planning a trip to do some basic camping around Grant Village in Yellowstone at the end of August with my parents, and then going to a wedding in Grand Targhee (that will have one night of camping), and then off for a 4-5 night backpacking trip in the Wind Rivers :allears:

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

I got my contrail tarptent in today and set it up in my backyard, it works fine with my shorter than recommended trekking pole, 110cm Z distance poles, from what I can tell I just have to cinch the front guy lines tighter.


1.5 lbs and I could definitely fit two friendly people in here if I wanted to. I seam sealed it so it should be fine as long as a huge thunderstorm doesn't hit us on the JMT

I feel like I should have gotten the Double Rainbow instead of the Fly Creek UL2, but whatever, not gonna complain about it now. The UL2 will work just fine and if I feel like blowing money I'll buy a Tarptent next year

My dad has the Contrail and used it on the JMT last year, and was really happy with it. He did get caught in a huge thunderstorm and it did fine according to him.

Silicone treated nylon seems to be the big thing for lightweight tents these days, and it's not really water "proof" in the sense that if you get hit with hard, driving rain, it will keep off most of the water but you'll get some "mist" from the bit of water that forces its way through the fabric. Doesn't seem to be enough to actually get you real wet, more like heavy condensation or something. Still, unless you're in heavy rain for days at a time, it shouldn't be a problem

edit: actually, he has the Moment, but still...

edit2: because I like looking through his hiking pics and everyone could always enjoy more hiking pics, here's a couple from the JMT last year

Lake Marie



Mount Banner over Garnet Lake



'Sup little Pika dude

Levitate fucked around with this message at 13:36 on Jun 3, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Seems plenty to me for those temperatures...maybe my legs just don't get particularly cold but I've been fine just wearing long underwear and hiking pants at night with temperatures getting down to at or below freezing. The sleeping bag you have probably makes a difference

For 45+ I probably wouldn't even wear pants, just long underwear...

e: for torso I usually wear long underwear, a shirt on top of that, and then I have a light fleece on top of that. If it' really cold, I put on another shirt. Again, your sleeping bag is probably a big factor in this. If it's a good one with a low temperature rating, then you probably don't need more. If it's a little light for those temps, it's probably cheaper to get some heavier long underwear or something rather than buy a whole new sleeping bag

Levitate fucked around with this message at 17:52 on Jun 5, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Went on an overnight backpack this weekend on the AT, just a short section headed north outside of the Shenendoahs. Basically jumped on the trail near Front Royal and went 7-something miles to a shelter. Was kind of a shakedown trip and testing out some equipment, etc, and also seeing how our dog would handle an overnight trip.

We were worried that she would be a pain during the night, barking at stuff, etc, but she did really well. She started the night here (at the foot of the tent):



By the time morning came around, this is about where she was:



Bit of a tight fit in a small tent but it worked out

Also, dog on the move:



And a newt we saw



Our dog also saw her first big snake and it freaked her the hell out. A big rat snake was crossing the trail and she had no idea what it was and barked her head off at it, then spent the next hour jumping backwards at every stick that seemed suspicious. It was pretty hilarious

Met a couple of people at the shelter and had a pretty good time, will have to get out some more but it's already warm and muggy around here, makes for a day just dripping with sweat

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

We saw multiple mule deer very close and the closest to a beer I've ever been right on the Alta Trail

Man that's not even vaguely as close to a beer as you should be :colbert:

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


My brother-in-law is thru hiking the AT this year and started with 2 of the e-vent dry bags, one for his sleeping bag and one for his clothes, and they're both still going strong after 1000 miles

The e-vent fabric seems pretty tough as long as you're not expecting to be able to drag it along rocks or through bushes or something, but it should be inside your pack anyways. They also make a sil-nylon bag that I have several of and I believe those do tear more easily, but they're also quite lightweight and good for some water protection (though they're not water proof in submersion or anything)

Look for them on sale though cuz they're not the cheapest!

Business of Ferrets posted:

Just wanted to give a shout out to the Sea-to-Summit E-vent Drybag; great little piece of equipment! (I pack one with my down quilt and/or jacket, and another, larger one for the rest of my clothes. Works wonderfully.)

How do you like using a quilt? After looking around at sleeping bags and finding the good ones around 20 degrees and below run nearly $400, I found Enlightened Equipment, where I could get a 10 degree quilt, 850 fill and about 1.7 lbs (under 1.5 for a 20 degree), for like $235. I'm reallllllly tempted but have to convince my wife because she has it in her head that she wants us to be able to join sleeping bags together in case it gets really cold. I find I've never had to do that but I guess she had to do it a couple of times with her brother on the start of the AT.

But man, that's a good price for a lightweight sleeping arrangement and I tend to be a person who switches positions at night a lot and I sleep on my side a fair amount, and they're supposed to be good for that

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


About how low a temp are you comfortable in with it? I don't do winter camping either, but late summer/early fall in high mountains can get below freezing and into the 20's. just wondering if I did get one, what rating I'd go for. And yeah I've read great things about the owner, seems like a cool guy

If it were up to me I'd get one for sure but this turns out to be one of the quirks of being married...

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Awesome, thanks. One last question...what width did you get and how does that work? I'm a pretty thin 6' 170, but with pretty wide shoulders for my size, but I kind of doubt I'd need a wide size.

everyone else, sorry for the gearchat, just a little excited to find someone with direct experience with a product I'm interested in

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Yah we checked about making sure we could take her along with us, and she was on leash 90% of the time (we let her off around the shelter after seeing if the other people were OK with it, but was on leash on the trail). Good point about the pet waste though, I'll be more careful about that in the future.

I don't think I'd really want to take her on actual deep backcountry hikes, but to be honest the AT is very close to civilization a lot of the time (especially around this area)

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


mastershakeman posted:

I take it the opinion on bear cans is pretty strong, but the rangers in Yellowstone told me they don't believe in bear cans at all and say to always hang your pack. There's no consensus on this at all, right?

That's pretty weird since I've read in places like the Sierra's, bears have started learning they can't even get into the bear cans and won't even try anymore if they see one. Hanging a bear bag on the other hand can be easily figured out by bears who have even learned how to send their cubs up trees to knock them down.

Maybe there's multiple sides in this but I'd at least be interested in why they don't believe in bear cans. Only thing I can think of is in Yellowstone, you have a lot of large grizzlies and it might be harder for them to get to hung bags, and you also have a lot of tall trees, making it easier to hang a bag. In other places, once you get above the tree line it can be pretty hard to find a place to hang a bag effectively

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Picnic Princess posted:

Well, Banff National Park and Kananaskis Country have effectively been destroyed this past couple of days. There's been massive flooding in the valleys, as well as watersheds east of the mountains that is still ongoing. The city of Calgary had serious floods in the downtown region and many low-lying neighbourhoods.

Right now the two major towns in the mountains, Canmore and Banff, are having major water supply issues or power outages. The trails and campgrounds throughout the mountain valleys appear to all have been washed away, and it looks like a lot of scrambling access routes are gone.

It's only been a couple of days, so damage assessments are just starting to come in as the water begins to recede.

When I finally get home from New Zealand, which has been having it's own weather problems, it looks like I won't be doing much in terms of hiking this summer! I may find a way to volunteer on clean-up and rebuilding if they still need help.



Dang, I lived in Calgary for a short time and went up to Banff and Kananaskis a couple of times, and all this poo poo is crazy, the flooding is nuts

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


FYAD KNIGHT posted:

I think any cooling effect is probably going to be imagined in those kind of temps. Make sure what you wear is light coloured such as the Columbia shirt as this will shed heat better than anything dark. You wont need to wear a Polartec at 110+.

Make sure you have ready access to water and salts as this is what will probably make you go down with heat stress. 110 is the range where your organs will start to cook so be careful

Yeah, strongly strongly recommend wearing light colored clothing (white if possible), assuming that strong sun is going to be part of the reason for the high temps. Your hat should also be white. If it's a dark colored hat, doesn't matter if its wide brimmed or ventilated or whatever, ditch it now and get a white one or your head will loving cook. I am completely serious about this it makes a huge difference.

Try to get up early and hike in the morning before it gets really hot. Take a break near a water source and some shade for the hot part of the day, hike again in the evening as it gets cooler if you haven't reached your destination. Don't push it, at those temps it's deadly if you're trying to do too much and get caught in a bad spot, and heat exhaustion/sun stroke can cause you to make bad and stupid decisions you wouldn't normally make.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


JAY ZERO SUM GAME posted:

My tent, with my compression bag, and what looks like my sleeping bag? :stare:

The blue bag? It's a Trailwise bag from the 70's so I'd guess odds are that it's not the same as yours, but what do I know...

The other one is a REI 45 degree Taveldown bag though

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


This came in the mail yesterday :dance:



It's a ULA Circuit. I really wanted to get a lighter pack, even though I liked my old Gregory a lot, and the ULA seems a pretty good balance of lightweight (I think you can get it down to almost 2 lbs by taking off some of the extras) and sturdiness that some other packs like the Gossamer Gear Mariposa seem to lack a bit. I also wasn't confident that I'd be able to consistently get down below 30 lbs on a long trip with my equipment so I wanted something that could handle 30-35. Hopefully will get to test it out in the next couple of weeks at least on a day hike.

Levitate fucked around with this message at 13:27 on Jul 2, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


I believe it's because they often use ripstop nylon fabric, which has that kind of pattern to it. Just a characteristic of the material. You can obviously do some other patterns or colors on top of that, but the checkered pattern comes from the material itself

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


7 Bowls of Wrath posted:

This is a question I had after reading some of the simple frommers guidebooks for the midwest national parks. Every park from canyonlands to grand canyon to arches all say "hiking is strenuous and difficult" etc. Its freaking my wife out who gets paranoid about these things and I dont think it is nearly as bad as they might make it out to be.

I think there are things to be worried about when you're in remote areas with relatively rough trails (narrow, rocky, not constantly maintained)...mainly, you could trip or slip or twist an ankle and fall and hurt yourself. The constant pounding on your feet can hurt and become a big problem if you're not used to it, some altitude gains and losses can also be hard on you (going downhill and causing problems with your knees, etc) and so on. But hiking itself is really just walking, and if you take it at the right pace and rest when necessary, it's not a big deal *most of the time* (sometimes there are issues like altitude sickness that can trump anything else and you just have to be aware of).

That said if you're in decent shape and have good equipment, you'll usually be fine. Bad equipment, poorly fitted footwear, and not knowing what you're getting into is when bad things happen. Not to mention weather and needing to know how to handle it (heat, cold, flash floods, etc)

edit: I think they say that hiking is strenuous and difficult in order to try to keep people from thinking like it's just going for a walk around the block or something like that. It's usually not hard if you're prepared but every year people have to be rescued from the Grand Canyon because they think they can just stroll to the bottom and back during the middle of the day without water or anything

quote:

What are the things we should prepare for if we hike in Utah / Arizona in early August? Presumably water is the biggest thing. Does anyone have any feel for the actual difficulty of most day hikes in that area? (needles, fiery furnace, bryces, zion)

Probably will be hot as balls with really harsh sun but I don't really remember what the hiking itself is like...sometimes sandy, sometimes slick rock?

Levitate fucked around with this message at 15:31 on Jul 2, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Maybe check out the TarpTent Double Rainbow?

http://www.tarptent.com/double-rainbow.html

Lighter and cheaper than a lot of them but you have to order it and read up on the downsides to tarp tents (mainly condensation)

the Fly Creek UL2 is a solid tent, it's what I have now. It's probably not the most durable but if you're reasonably careful with it, then it should be fine.

edit: oh, the double rainbow isn't a single entrance

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Massasoit posted:

How long have you had your Fly Creek for and do you use a groundcloth?

I haven't had it too long. I do use a footprint, but it's one I made myself rather than the official footprint. Still I'd recommend using one personally, gives you a little extra protection. Depends somewhat on the terrain and weather.

My brother-in-law is through hiking the AT with his Fly Creek UL2 and as far as I know it has held up great for over 1000 miles now

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Oh okay. Maybe go with a 3-person Big Agnes UL tent then, should have plenty of extra room in it for gear and dog and still be light enough to backpack with especially split with two people. The Fly Creek UL2 is exactly 52" across, no extra room in that one.

Yeah the fit is tight in the UL2 for two people and a (small) dog. Doable, but tight. If you have wide sleeping pads then it could be a nonstarter

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


REI has some good intro to hiking/backpacking stuff on their website if you look for it, including a list of stuff to pack

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Find a nice cold stream/lake and soak your feet after a day of hiking. Also, thick socks might end up being more of a problem in the long run because you'll have less space for your feet to expand in your boots if they do swell. I'd probably aim for better cushioned or better fitting boots/shoes before I rely on thick, cushioned socks to reduce impact

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Anyone hiked the Dolly Sods or good areas around eastern West Virginia? Want to plan some trips a little further away from the DC area

vvv - Nice

Levitate fucked around with this message at 02:24 on Jul 10, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


How long are you going to be on the JMT?

I really need to do one of these long trips...save up a bunch of time off or take unpaid leave or something

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


What about grizzlies

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


In retrospect I'd probably go with the Double-rainbow if I was buying a tent again, but oh well. It seems pretty sweet, there's just a 3 week backorder on them at all times it seems.

For water treatment, I've just used Aquamira in the backcountry, which is probably cleaner water than closer to civilization but still plenty of hazard from stuff like giardia, especially in places that allow pack animals or still have some grazing allowed. Never had any problems with it...though they don't exactly claim that it's for treating water either. It's kinda weird but it does kill poo poo, just not viruses.

My impression has always been that filters are better for cloudy waters and stuff and should filter more than just treatment alone if you have a good one? Maybe I'm wrong on that.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


It's not that you can't backpack with cheaper, bigger, heavier gear. People did it for years until manufactures got better at making lighter gear, etc. It just means you're lugging more weight around which can be difficult but certainly not impossible. Like a lot of stuff that involves the buying of gear, it's probably worth it to find out what the limits of your budget are and buy the lightest stuff you can according to that, and you can always upgrade and sell the old stuff later.

I just say this because I think it can come across like "you can't possibly backpack with that it's too heavy what are you thinking?!" even if that's not the intention, and it's pretty easy to get caught up in gear stuff and start trying to get everything as light as possible because some ultralight hiker snickered behind your back at your 35 lb pack or something.

Buy the best you can comfortably afford. Packing your clothes and food in some ways makes a bigger difference on weight so learn how to do that and then go have fun.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Don't discount the advantages of lighter gear.

oh I'm not! I'm just trying to tell someone who is looking into buying equipment for the first time that if they can't afford ultralight gear, that it doesn't mean they're doing it wrong or something like that. Light gear definitely makes things better (as long as you're not stupid about what weight you're cutting) but not everyone has the money to invest in that stuff when they're first getting started and they shouldn't feel like they're getting "crappy gear" or something because they can't afford to get the best.

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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


snappo posted:

Ultimately, your enjoyment of backpacking comes down to your own motivation to GTFO with whatever gear you happen to have and put in some miles. I see people on backwoods trails with their makeshift walking sticks and giant heaps of quilts and foam and tarps and pots bungee-corded to their 40 year-old aluminum-frame backpacks, and they seem to do just fine. They'll hike a little slower, and probably drive home more sore and chafed, but they're out there doing what they love.

Yes, the specialized gear is nice and often totally worth it, but just because some guy on Youtube weighing his gear in grams with a kitchen scale says your poo poo is too heavy doesn't mean you can't actually go backpacking. My first few backpacking trips were with "car camping" gear (including a 4-person dome tent for two of us) and that didn't stop me from having a blast. Upgrade as the need arises and as you can afford to do so, but make your first priority actually getting out to the trail.

Yeah this exactly :)

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