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BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Anyone have any idea when the big REI %20 sale and dividend will be this year? I thought it was usually in March but I'm not %100 sure. Need to get a canoe when they're running it.

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BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

I thought that sale always exempted hard shell boats?

I hope not! I thought it was just electronics and non-novara brand bikes. Sucks trying to get someone to ship a canoe to rural Alaska, was hoping the discount would help me offset the cost of shipping it up here.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Dread Head posted:

I am going to be doing my first real winter camping next weekend, pretty excited. Only thing I am not sure what I am unsure about is what I am going to do for food. For other trips I have done freeze dried back packers pantry stuff but after my last trip I don't really want to do that again. Any suggestions on alternatives?

Depending on what kind of stove you have during winter you might be able to pack some premade pancake mix and make pancakes. I love making some in the morning at camp. Another delicious way to add some variety to oatmeal is to use tea as the water to cook the oats. Chai tea oatmeal is amazing!

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Looks like REI has calculated dividends! Haven't seen the usual %20 off coupon yet.

Has anyone had any experience using microspikes? Are they small enough to use that you can wear them along with snowshoes? How are they over rocks? I've been using yak traks but there not very durable and seem to clog up almost in powdery snow.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



That seems like a ton of money for a rain jacket but I doubt its a bad jacket. Personally I've always had good luck with the Marmot PreCip and similar jackets. No matter how much it costs at some point you WILL sweat out a jacket hiking. I always look for one with waterproof zippers and pit zips. If you have pit zips you can go a lot further hiking before you sweat out.

As for treating it I can usually go a year at least before I have to spray on some waterproofing. I don't hardly ever wash my rain coat though so maybe it lasts longer.

Regarding knife talk the only time I pack another knife besides the one in my multi-tool is when I'm going fishing or hunting and plan on dressing an animal or fileting a fish.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Levitate posted:

Anyone have sleeping bag recommendations for something around lightweight 20-30 degree bags? I'm trying to decide if I should spend money at some point this summer to get one for a trip later this year, or just say screw it and use my dad's old Trailwise Slimline that I've used in the past...a newer, lighter bag would probably be good but on the other hand I could just be spending $300 for a pound of weight difference

I've got The North Face Cat's Meow 20 degree bag and have been very happy with it. I've had it for years. It's warm, light, and stuffs down very well to about the size of an oblong bowling ball.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

Jesus christ you guys are gearheads.

It's fun to talk about because it reminds me of times out on the trail. At a certain point though you just need to pick something and use it. 99 percent of the time experience will trump any features that one piece of gear has over another. Some people just really like one type of piece of gear to and get way into it. I have a friend who is obsessed with headlamps for some reason. Has a million of them and could tell me the pros and cons of all the different models. Lot's of people seem to be that way with knives and axes too.

Personally I'd rather save myself the money on top of the line gear and just shed 5 pounds of body weight before a long hike. It's easier, cheaper, and more beneficial to just be in shape.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Levitate posted:

Yah, I just like to get some opinions and find out if anyone really loves something or has good experiences.

With my sleeping bag question, I think I'm just going to go with using my dad's old bag...I've used it before for mountain backpacking in September and it's fine, it probably just needs a good wash and some repairs to a hole that spent 20 years repaired with duct tape. Makes for kind of a fun project maybe...might be able to just patch it with some nylon tape, or maybe get some fabric and repair it, guess it depends on how much effort I want to spend. Using old gear is kind of cool/fun sometimes :)

Yeah using old gear can be fun. Don't let me dissuade you from buying a new sleeping bag though! I think out of all the gear I've purchased over the years a good sleeping bag has made me a lot happier at the end of the day. The newer bags just pack down so small that it makes things a lot easier packing and warmer.

Favorite gear purchase ever is split between my gaiters and a khatadin water filter. Man I love that thing, just makes life so much easier. I actually enjoy the pumping too. Doesn't take that long and gives you a nice quick break to enjoy the scenery.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Has anybody experimented with making their own food bars and keeping them on the trail? I've got to ship myself resupplies before I do the JMT and they could be out there 2 weeks to a month before I get them. I'd like to be able to cut some cost and packaging waste Obviously no perishable ingredients in them like dairy or anything I refrigerate, but they've got oil and water in them, I'm wondering if that would impact how this fares as compared to say trail mix (similar ingredients just less moisture). Would one advise toward 0 water content?

Just check yourself for ticks daily, imho. That poo poo is a toxic chemical. I think it might be deadly to cats as well.

I've had good luck making bars with oats, and whatever nuts and dry fruit you'd like, a scoop or two of protein powder and then keeping it all together with sweetened condensed milk. Mix it all together and bake for a bit. Here is a base recipe that I go off of skipping the coconut and adding whatever I'd like:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Easy-Granola-Bars/Detail.aspx

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



PRADA SLUT posted:

Are fixed or folding knives generally preferred for multiday hikes?

Depends on what I'm going to be doing during and on the hike. If I plan on fishing at any point in the trip or hunting I take my fixed blade. So much easier and quicker to filet a fish or dress an animal with a fixed blade.

For books on edible plants try and find something region specific. I see lots of general North America books on wild edibles but I've found that the more region/climate specific books go into far greater detail and are more useful in helping to identify plants.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Tagra posted:

I need some advice, Hiking thread.

My husband and I have identical Osprey 3L hydration packs. One of them tastes great. The other one tastes like rear end. To be specific, it tastes kind of like smokey plastic, but they've both had roughly equal use. We've had them for a year and a half now, I think.

How can we get the taste out of the nasty one? They both tasted plasticky when they were new, but the one cleared right up while the other one seemed to just get worse. We've run hot water through it but it didn't seem to help. I'm currently soaking it with hot water and baking soda to see if that does anything. We have a backpacking trip coming up in a couple weeks and he's just about ready to just go buy a new one and hope for better luck... but a new one is going to taste nasty too at first so I don't think it will help him much.

[edit]They've had chlorine tabs in them too so I don't think it's a bacteria thing, but maybe I'm wrong.

Try rinsing it out with warm water and soap and then drying it out a bit with a towel and sticking it in the freezer for a few days. That's always kept mine pretty stink free.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Tagra posted:

Are there any "on the trail" remedies to help prevent foot swelling? We have a multi-day hiking trip coming up in a few weeks, and when we did this last year my toes started to chafe at the very end because my feet had finally filled my boots. I bought some super padded hiking socks this time, but I'm not sure how much they will help. Our final day is the longest one so I just have to hobble back to the parking lot, but I'd like to know if there's anything extra I can do.

Wearing a sock liner can make a big difference. I also carry some Bag Balm which is really greasy heavy lotion type stuff and slather it all over my feet at the end of a day of hiking. Also making sure your boots are nice and broke in and not brand new out of the box right before your hike.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



jamal posted:

I had new balance MT20s and I really liked them but they developed a tear within a few months. Ran in them and wore them on a couple of hikes, including one that was about 10 miles over very rocky and wet terrain. They gave me a replacement set of 1010s, which I haven't even worn yet. inov-8 makes zero drop really thin soled trail runners which I might look into next.

Lately we have had warm weather where all the snow melts and then re-freezes so all of the trails are sheets of ice. Put screws in the bottom of my boots today and they rocked. Walking on ice is like walking on dry ground:



3-4 of them pulled out on a short hike though. Should have probably gotten slightly bigger screws. Went with #6x3/8 sheet metal screws (not self tapping). Think 1/2" would still be ok or maybe just #8 screws would have a little more purchase.


I've done the same thing in the past for running shoes. It might not be the best solution for hiking, but my god would I rather run on ice and snow with home made screw cleats than anything else. Doesn't make you slip proof but comes pretty close.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



me your dad posted:

I had no idea REI rented equipment. It looks like my not-so-local store rents sleeping bags.

So far I've spent $125 on a decent frame pack and a barely-used tent so I can't complain. I plan on taking more trips too now that my gear is building back up. Backpacking has quite a steep entry cost and time commitment so I hadn't even considered it until my friend convinced me to come along for this trip.


Cool thanks for that tip. I'll pick up some of those tablets.

Take a look at some sites like campmor, campsaver (which I believe gives a %10-20 coupon for one item for first time buyers), and BackCountry Outlet for gear too. Your more than likely going to be paying full retail at REI in exchange for basically a one year warranty and return insurance policy. Also if weight isnt a huge issue you might be able to get buy with a crappy huge/bulky but cheap coleman type sleeping bag that are usually used for spares in peoples cabins and rv's and whatnot.

Also don't worry about the steep entry cost. I don't know anybody who bought everything all at once and went out fully equipped. You start with the basics like your doing and as you get more time and money and find more deals you start to round out your gear until you've got a bag ready to go fully packed to take at a moments notice! Thrift stores, garage sales, and craigslist can all have bargains if your willing to spend the time and effort to weed through the junk for used gear. If you start hiking with a large group too you can probably get some free stuff that is extra or unwanted buy others too. I ended up with a rain coat and sleeping pad that I used for a long time that way.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Levitate posted:

Yeah, it's really not usually an issue unless you're in a place that's real wet/doesn't let you really air things out, or you get unlucky and have days of rain and a leaky tent. It takes a pretty catastrophic occurrence to wet your bag through enough on a "normal" trip that the down is compromised...your pack falling in a river, your tent springing a leak and soaking everything, etc. Honestly I don't even use a waterproof stuff sack because you get some water protection from your pack, a pack cover if you have one, and most of the regular nylon bags are a little bit water resistant, plus you have all the other stuff in your pack protecting it dependin gon how you pack.

If I was doing the AT or something I would maybe take a waterproof stuff sack since you're just out for so long and early on it can be cold and wet

I was hiking in SE Alaska on a remote island that we got dropped off at by float plane. The FIRST day skirting around the edge of an alpine lake I managed to fall in with my fully loaded pack. Even after kicking off the pack so that I could get up and it being partially submerged only about the top inch of stuff in my pack actually got wet. All of the nylon and other water resistant materials kept everything dry including a book I had packed.

I think where vapor barriers really help is in climates where your going to be out moving and sweating in the cold for a long period of time. I would wear vapor barriers on my hands and feet since those would tend to sweat out first for me when hiking in the winter.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



evil_bunnY posted:

Most VBLs (including goretex) barely breathe at all, and none of them help with liquid sweat.

Exactly. Makes them perfect for long back to back days in winter. I'd rather my feet and hands be clammy in a vbl then start to have my gloves and boots sweat out.

Went snowshoeing this past weekend. I have to say no matter how much easier it is to go up hill with the newer snow shoes the old ones let you carry a ton of gear in a sled and pretend your an old trapper man.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



If I'm going to be out any longer than a single night I prefer a tent. I've done so bike trekking with my rei quarterdome tent and it was easy enough to fit in my panniers.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



I usually just bring my medium size leatherman, and if I'm hunting my fixed blade hunting knife. I don't mind packing both at all. I usually end up using the pliers on the leatherman and occasionally the saw even. My hunting knife isn't some super sized rambo knife though. Just a good medium size buck brand knife that I keep super sharp. Makes life so much easier when your dressing game.

Has anyone here done a boundary waters float trip? I'm starting to consider it for summer. I'd like to canoe a bunch obviously but I'd have to get out for a day or two to hike the area as well.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



SubponticatePoster posted:

Does anyone carry fishing gear when they backpack? I figure if I can get a pretty light setup it would be fun to fish in places that haven't been filled with old discarded line and beer cans.

I've taken some fishing gear with me before on long hikes. Tenkara poles like somebody else mentioned are great and light. What I do more frequently though is wrap a bunch of line around my water bottle and then tie a hook to the line. You can pack a bobber, sinker and lure separately to use when needed. Then you just unspool a bunch of line and toss it out and then wind it back around your bottle to reel it in. Obviously not the best solution but a fun little distraction out on the trail. I've hauled in grayling and trout with this method.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Anyone else having problems in submitting to the lottery for The Enchantments at the recreation.gov website?

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

The opening of the 2014 lottery application period previously scheduled for February 15 has been temporarily delayed. Please check this web page for future updates.

Yeah I saw that when I logged in at midnight last night, said it was going to be delayed until 3 AM. I gave up went to sleep and was hoping to get in the lottery this morning. Oh well, guess I'll have to wait. I'm itching to go out and get some hiking done. Starting to get cabin fever. Snowshoeing only does so much for me.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

Today's the last day of the Enchantment lottery. Having lost out on it for three years now, when are the winners expected to receive notification?

Supposedly midnight tomorrow, but I'd take that with a grain of salt after their initial delay this year. I'm in as well, really hoping I get it this year.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Looks like the Enchantment lottery results got delayed until this Sunday.

For sleeping pad chat. I love my cheap little yellow therm-a-rest foam fold up thing, whatever they're calling it now. I take that thing on every trip with me. Packs down easy, weighs hardly anything and you can fold it up to make a nice chair, use it to pad delicate stuff in your pack. That thing is awesome! Now in the winter I use my down inflatable pad, way to warm in any season but late fall and winter.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

Did anyone get lottery results? I'm expecting yet another year of failure :sigh:

I didnt get it yet again. :smith:

But now I'm looking into alternate Summer trips! Really focused on The Grand Tetons, Alberta Canada, and following parts of the Lewis & Clark trail in Montana. Just doing the research now.

Does anyone here have any suggestions for alpine lakes with minimal crowds and breathtaking views that I can stay on trail at least 3 days?

Gearchat: REI dividend coming out soon. Might invest in a new sleeping bag. My Cats Meow 20 degree bag has seen better days, if I cant revive it with a good wash and tennis ball drying I might look into some new options. Or splurge on a canoe. Anyone ever try a folding or backpack canoe? Do we have a canoe/kayak thread anywhere?

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Fitzy Fitz posted:

Speaking of sleeping bags, what should I be looking for if I'm dealing with 30 degree nights? I just bought a Marmot Buttbreak 30, took it out for a couple of nights, and I still found myself pretty drat cold at night. Meanwhile my girlfriend had a cheap $30 0-degree bag and was just fine. I know it has a lower temperature rating, but am I missing something else here?

What kind of sleeping pad were you using? Those can make a huge difference. A closed foam pad will be really cheap, durable, and weigh hardly anything while give you a bit of warmth. At those temperatures it's probably all you would need. You can also move up to inflatables which are bit heavier and can be popped, but they have more cushion which some people really like when camping and depending on the model can be extremely warm.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Anyone have any suggestions for restoring wet down? My basement flooded and I had my 0 degree down bag stored in a big box so that it wouldnt be all compressed. Of course it got wet and there are baseball sized clumps in the baffles now.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



mastershakeman posted:

So with the Enchantment permit, it seems like we're kind of screwed - both permits my group got are for Lake Stuart zone, which is a dead end. Once we're in the backcountry, would rangers be enforcing the permit issue the 2nd night? I'm envisioning camping at Lake Stuart the first night, then back to the junction and up through Asgard Pass with a campsite at one of the upper lakes, then exiting the third day.

I'd call and check but it was my understanding that the pass covered you for the date you intended to enter the zone and then you could stay up to a certain number of days, 5 I think, though I can't remember where I read that. Congratulations on getting a permit! Wish I was as lucky. I didn't think there were any designated sites either. Again a call and they'll be able to explain everything I would imagine.

Joe Videogames posted:

Pants & Poles

People always say that cotton kills, but I've had awesome luck with Duluth fire hose pants. When I've done bushwacking or scrambles over rocks the pants hold up better than anything I've ever worn and they have pretty good range of movement too. I think also because the weave is so tight that even when they get wet they never feel like they're soaking and seem to dry out pretty quickly. As others have mentioned with poles they do save the knees quite a bit and I find them extremely useful when traversing over slick rocks, unstable ground, etc.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



I've been using an REI quarterdome T2 tent for years. I've always been interested in using tarp tents but the weight savings never seemed to justify the cost of switching. Right now with poles, stakes, guy lines, footprint and the tent itseld I'm at just a little under 4 pounds with it being kind of long and bulky due to the poles. So I could go out and buy an expensive tarp tent and by the time I add in a bug liner I've spent $300 and saved maybe 2 pounds?

Am I missing something or is there some other setup you all use? Don't get me wrong I've setup plenty of Wheelens in the past and they are kind of fun, but I just don't get the tarp tent love.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Yiggy posted:

From my perspective, there are only so many items in your kit that you can squeeze significant weight savings out of, and the tent is a big one. I also know that I'm going to be using trekking poles, so part of the appeal to me is making that item multi-use while also shaving weight off my pack. Also, I used to use a half dome, and fitting the tent poles in my backpack with everything else was kind of a pain. Knowing that I'm going to be hiking in an area which needs a bearcan this summer, pack space has also become a concern for me. Not to mention the extra 2-3 lbs the bearcan adds, so negating that is also a concern. A tarptent allows me to fit everything in the pack for much lighter, while using the "tent poles" part for something else along the hike, outside of the pack where it isn't causing problems. This means I can go for a slightly smaller, and hence lighter, backpack.

I was taking a look at the quarterdome you've had for awhile, versus the current quarterdome offered for sale, vs the tarptent I've been using (a notch). The new quarterdome model has shaved about 14 ounces off of the old weight and is retailing at 300.00 without the footprint. Though it is smaller (90 x 54 inches for the quarterdome, 84 x 32 inches for the notch), a new notch is 275.00, +12 if you buy a tyvek groundsheet with it. The weight difference is 2 lb 4 ounces from the advertised minimum pack weight, which tends to be optimistic based on my experience with the halfdome. The aforementioned contrail is only marginally heavier and about 70 bucks cheaper too if you're ok with a single wall tent.

Wow I hadnt realized they had shaved off so much weight with the new one. Part of the reason I havent gone full tarp tent yet is that I don't use hiking poles. Also for years I lived in Western Alaska and the closest thing we had to trees were tiny little Willows so I couldnt really tie down to anything. I've already got my sleeping pad, bag (though I may upgrade to a newer down 20 degree bag, even though I love my cats meow 20), and pack down to pretty light weights. Switched out my jet boil to a tiny trangia stove. Tent is the last frontier gear wise for me. Plus I've always been of the opinion that its better to loose 2 pounds of belly fat then spend $300 to save 2 pounds.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



beefnoodle posted:

Good timing on this discussion. I'll be section-hiking the Colorado Trail this summer, much of it above treeline. As a result, my Hennessy hammock won't be as useful. I've just bought a Golite tarp tent and I'll be using my hiking poles with it. Bugs aren't really an issue here, so I'm not bothering with a nest. I may look at a bivy for protection from heavy rain. This is instead of my older REI quarter dome rig.


I've got some Tyvek I'll cut to use as a ground sheet under my pad. I've set it up a couple of times in the backyard, and will need to play with it a little more to be ready for rainy/windy set up conditions. Setting up the hammock fly in the rain is all muscle-memory; I hope to get the tarp tent to that point.

Yeah I'm really fascinated by them because they do look so versatile, although less so for me since I don't use poles and lived in a treeless area for so long. Plus all the hardcore types seem to do really well with them. I know some hunters in the brooks range use tarp tents in an ultralight setup and seem to do well in that region. Keeps them dry and blocks some of the wind.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



REI dividends came out today. Got a whopping $13! Also Campsaver is running a %20 off one full price item, dont know if that is for people on their email list or store wide. Now seems like a good time to stock up for the summer season.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



gently caress My rear end posted:

Does anyone ITT carry while they go hiking/backpacking? Florida allows for Open Carry when hunting/fishing/camping. Bears aren't a huge problem, depending on what part of the state you're in. I've ran into a couple of cougars though (which if you shoot one your life better have been in real danger because a game warden will gently caress you with charges). I OC a Glock 20, but this is also on private property that my friend owns.

It depends on where you are hiking. When I lived in Western Alaska I absolutely carried a large caliber handgun with me. And despite what some people say it did come in handy and quite possibly saved my rear end at least once. Myself and a group of friends were canoeing and had gotten out to walk the canoe over a shallow sandbar when we came across a calf and its mother moose. My friend got charged by one and had to empty a clip into it feet from where we were standing. As others have said I would rather come across a bear then a moose which are flighty and unpredictable. It was also comforting to know I had one when walking through grizzly country although I never encountered a situation where I was forced to use my gun against a bear. Generally they would run away if they caught wind of you or heard you. That said there were other people in the region who had to shoot bears in self defense so it wasnt totally unheard of.

Now saying all of that, there is no way in hell that I would carry one on any established trail or park system. To many people, the risk is just so low and could be mitigated easily. Maybe if I was up in Northern Minnesota, Maine, or backcountry areas of Montana, Wyoming, etc. Still I doubt I would bring one even there, better off storing your food appropriately and making your presence known.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



gariig posted:

Skipping gun chat and let's do knife chat. I want to get a knife for backpacking. My wife and I stick to short day hikes on trails. Currently we have a multi-tool that we bring along but I wanted something that could take a beating. Is a ~4 inch fixed blade knife a good idea or should I stick to a folding knife? Any suggestions on brands?

If you find that you need something else beside the common multitool you see get recommended here look into Mora knifes. Dirt cheap awesome and pretty durable. Are you going to be able to hack it straight into a tree and jump up and down on it? No, but when is the last time you needed to do that. It'll perform %90 as good as one of those fancy dozier knifes and run you way way less. You can usually get them for around $10.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Tricerapowerbottom posted:

Can anyone give me some advice for the following questions:

3: Tent. I'm looking for a one piece, collapsible, three season tent that will accommodate two adults, two children, and whatever we didn't tie up in a tree. Just something that you can unlatch a few straps, throw it at the ground, and it springs out full size, then throw a few stakes for the rain guard. Less worried about weight than I am about price, as our trips are not going to be long, 30 mile jaunts into the nothingness, more just a few miles from where we parked to get moderately isolated.

Cabela's has some decently priced family style tents. Expect one in the size you are looking for to be pretty heavy. Sounds like you are mostly just walking a mile or two from your car when your family heads out so you should be fine. I've used them before on hunting trips where we travel by four wheeler and weight is less a concern then bulk and packing multiple tents.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



I've used those Duluth fire hose jeans and I love them for hiking. I did a 8 day trip in SE Alaska with them and they were awesome. The high density canvas didnt soak up a ton of water and dried it quickly, super tough too.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



warderenator posted:

Does a portable electric fence actually exist and does anyone do that?

Totally exists. One of the coolest moments in my life was when I was in a little remote village in Alaska called Wales. Some crazy South Koreans had WALKED across the frozen Bering Straits. I got a chance to talk to them while we were waiting for the plane. They said they werent allowed to carry rifles on their journey so they had an electric fence that they put to good use. They actually had a polar bear stalking them the last couple of days and had to even shoot a flare towards it to attempt to keep some distance between them.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Super excited to be through hiking Zion National Park in in late October! Any recommendations on places to see? Starting off in the Kolobs to the west and headed to the west rim trail before hitting the east rim trail. Afterwards we'll have a nice day in Springdale and then relaunch to day hike the narrows.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



DholmbladRU posted:

I have been a backpackers for many years, including a AT thru-hike attempt(~900 miles). However when I graduated from university and got a full time job, time got scarce. Well I found out my co-workers enjoy backpacking and we were planning a hike for labor day this year. Went to go get some gear ready and realized I cant find my pack, or gear... I was planning on getting a new pack and shelter anyways, but am really sad I cant find my AT book or some of the other items Ive hiked with for so long.

Can anyone recommend me the following items, I would like to go as UL as possible while keeping comfort

Pack(was looking at atmos 50)
2 wall tent
stove(used jet boil previously, like the speed)
water filtration(used drops previously)

Granite Gear and GoLite both make some UL 50L packs for a decent price. There are a bunch of good tents out there now. The REI quarterdome is a good cheap 2 wall tent, LL Bean makes a backpacking tent thats pretty good, or you can go the tarp tent route if you really want to save on weight. For water filtration I use iodine if I'm going solo otherwise you can get some pump filters that work well when hiking with big groups where you can split up the weight. For stoves I like jet boils if I'm by myself or going really light otherwise I really love my Trangia for some more complex trail cooking.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Picnic Princess posted:

I took a friend up to see Sunshine Meadows in Banff National Park, I passed through on a backpacking trip a few years ago. It has yet to be sunny when I'm there.



Where's the snacks? by Geographic Ecotourist, on Flickr



Also, fireweed (the pink flowers) smell really strongly of some sort of stinky cheese to me.

Seeing all of that fireweed really makes me miss Alaska. Despite the smell it is good in salads! And I've had some good fireweed jelly too.

Took advantage of a sale and bought my first down quilt. Really looking forward to trying it this fall. Has an EN comfort limit of 38 and a limit of 28. I think it will be awesome with my Exped down mat and I got a great deal on it. Hopefully it can become my summer bag of choice and I can my old faithful cats meow to late fall duty only. For those of you who are quilt sleepers do you find it necessary to wear a hat all of the time? I always like that about my mummy bags is that I could take my hat off and let my head breath a little.

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BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Any suggestions on good two person tarp tents? I have an old QuarterDome T2 that I like but I want to look for something thats a little more packable and light weight for solo hikes and hunting season. The only real requirement I have is that it has a bug net. I stay in some pretty buggy areas. The options are just so numerous and bewildering to me. Some look cool but would only save me a pound and dont seem worth it. Others weigh nothing but take 12 tie outs and look like they were designed by MC Escher.

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