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grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Unzip and Attack posted:

I'll throw out True Detective as well - I think it's the best TV since The Wire. For me, Breaking Bad was really good, but not Great. For the poster saying they were thinking about The Sopranos, do yourself a favor and start today. The modern TV golden age we're experiencing is largely due to The Sopranos achieving such popular acclaim and like The Wire, it gets better with every re-watch.

The Wire, True Detective, Breaking Bad, The Sopranos, Mad Men: shows attentive people with critical eyes and a hard on for character development, theme exploration, and continuity will appreciate.

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grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

To hammer home this HDwidescreen discussion: What this guy said ^

And what this guy said:

MrBling posted:

Most likely because David Simon doesn't want it.

quote:

And perhaps the final contrast to the rest of high-end episodic television, The Wire for each of its five seasons has been produced in good old fashioned 4 x 3 standard definition. DP Dave Insley recalled, "The reason the show has stayed 4x3 is because David Simon thinks that 4x3 feels more like real life and real television and not like a movie. The show's never been HD, even 4x3 HD and that (SD) is how it is on the DVDs. There is no 16x9 version anywhere." As a viewer with an HD set I will point out that like much of SD television that makes its way to HD channels, it appears that HBO utilizes state-of-the-art line doubling technology. It may still be standard definition, but line doubled it looks considerably better on a high definition set than it would on a standard definition set.

Insley explained, "When the show started 2001 / 2002 they framed it for 16 x 9 as a way of future-proofing. Then a couple of seasons ago, right before Season 4 began shooting, there was a big discussion about it and after much discussion -- David, Nina, Joe Chappelle, the Producers, the DPs -- and we discussed what should be the style of the show. David made the decision that we would stay with 4x3. The DPs pretty much defined the look to be what it is now. And it's been consistent for the past two seasons."

from: http://library.creativecow.net/articles/griffin_nick/hbo_the_wire.php

So to be clear, it's possible to have the show be 4:3 and also HD. It probably won't be widescreen/16:9. (Although most technically, it will be 16:9 with black bars on the sides.)

And FYI, syndicated HD Seinfeld is not cropped, they simply took the original 35mm and left in the cropped sides of the screen. This is why watching these episodes feels so loving weird, because all the actors are always jumbled in the middle of the frame with a bunch of empty space on the left and right. It also has the added effect of making the stock establishing shots, which already looked lovely compared to the actual scenes, even more lovely to look at.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Looks like we're both right, buddy.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Each season tries to focus in on a specific area of life, so it's only natural different people get more emotionally invested in different seasons. As someone who's worked in newsrooms, I'll defend season 5 despite its flaws.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Murder police demand respect of both street poo poo and the fed. The suit is the first step.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

That's commonplace.

My big takeaway from this piece is Bob Colesberry seems like a dope rear end dude and Simon is a lot more even-keel about this than the various headlines about his post claim.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

dreffen posted:

Here read stuff that David Simon wrote about the HD re-release

http://davidsimon.com/the-wire-in-hd/

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

dreffen posted:

Here read stuff that David Simon wrote about the HD re-release

http://davidsimon.com/the-wire-in-hd/

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Yeah man it's bad enough my TV is a black frame surrounded by the various colors and junk on my entertainment system. I don't need no more plain uniform black. That's the line.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Feel free to browse the last couple pages for opinions about it. Spoiler: it's mostly pretty great. There are a handful of shots that were very framed for 4:3 that look weird (especially in the pilot), but that's it. The rest is nice and comes down to weird personal preferences. See: the scene being discussed above.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Jerusalem nailed it, McNulty's lightbulb has gone off. I love this show.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

To be completely fair, they're hard to convince because they follow the law.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

This concludes today's exciting episode of Where The gently caress Is Wallace At?

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Specifically that mentality is related to blue collar unions, and definitely still exists. Season 2 is probably a very eye-opening and strange thing for people who've always lived in Right To Work states.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Landsman is an exceptional middle manager who earned the seat and is smart enough to know to stay put. I'm slowly reading Homicide and Simon very quickly and repeatedly shows the reader that knowing when to stop climbing the ladder is as important a skill as any. Like knowing how to stay on your rung.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

That was my first major takeaway in my unavoidable comparison of the Homicide novel to The Wire. Simon almost immediately spends pages and pages on human kind's greatest defense mechanism: inappropriate humor.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

forever whatever posted:

McNulty and Freamon's serial killer scheme was probably (nah, definitely) the least believable subplot on the entire show, but I guess it does serve to highlight how completely hosed the department was after five years of McNulty's petulant bitching about it.

Remember, the show is a series of 9/11 metaphors.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

There is actually dialogue that says a version of the above post.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Any show would be better if influenced by this one. Are you sure you weren't trying to post in the Lost thread?

Or do you mean this show is so good that it's set a standard for you that most other shows can't meet?

Edit: The latter is exactly what you mean.

Yes. Yes it has. Dialogue in particular has always been a pet peeve of mine and this show has rendered plenty of others unbearable.

grilldos fucked around with this message at 11:43 on Jun 20, 2015

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

L&O's Munch cameo'd in The Wire's season 5 as well. I don't mind dragging this back out.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Jerusalem posted:



And he won't even have to give it back!



Clark Kent is Superman???

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

A show full of well written characters will result in each viewer hating and loving their own sets of them.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

Jerusalem posted:

I actually felt like this was a pretty good look at the liberating sensation Michael was feeling once freed from all the constraints and expectations being piled on him by such a wide variety of people. When we first meet the character it's during school holidays and he's far happier and quite often wisecracks or make jokes ("You heard about that boy Deez? Yeah... Deez Nuts!"). But as the show progresses and he's back in school, his stepdad is back in the picture, Cutty is creeping him out, Randy is being called a snitch, Namond is getting in too deep to the drugs, Dukie needs a home to live, Marlo has taken an interest in him, Chris and Snoop are training him etc.... well you see him clamming up and becoming emotionally guarded. Once Chris is in prison, his friends are out of his life, his little brother is taken care off, Snoop and his stepdad are dead etc.... he's basically free. Sure he's on the run and has nothing, but he no longer has any of that relentless pressure on him and he actually becomes happier/more carefree like he was during the Summer holidays he no longer remembers.

It's sure as hell not a happy ending, but I feel like he is happier than he has been in a long time.

There is a circular, poetic flair to Michael's arc that I think works very well, bookended by his happiness, in this case evidenced through his humor. If you choose to really read into things, Michael is left with the possibility of having one less weakness than Omar -- specifically, a family member he regularly sees. If he can leave his brother behind, the world, however small his is, is his oyster.

Which is particularly depressing.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Grimey Drawer

How many seconds does a word need to be spoken before it constitutes a phrase.

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grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

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Orange Devil posted:

What feels off about Namond is that he's basically hood royalty growing up, and out of all the kids to get a happy ending, it's the relatively privileged and spoiled one that gets it. When you look at Namond as just Namond, it's a happy story about a guy born in a hosed up family and life who manages to escape it and get a real shot at something better because of the selfless efforts of a no poo poo good guy cop. When you look at it in the context of the whole group of kids, even this arc of salvation is mired in classism.

You are correct. Many adoptions involve parents picking out the child with the best "potential*" which only furthers class issues. In this case it's the bittersweet cherry on Colvin's story. I bet if you pull up the scenes of Namond with Colvin, they're juxtaposed with Randy's dealings with the orphan system.

*The word "pedigree" floats to mind, with all of its racial tension.

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