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hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Skeesix posted:

While we're talking about the Wire's non-liberal stances, I'm currently watching the HBO special on the Cheshire killings, where the perpetrators are portrayed as the "Poster Children for the Death Penalty." Let's talk about the Wire's supportive stance on the death penalty. The Wire portrays the Death Penalty as a wrench to obtain confessions from hardened killers who can't be reached any other way. Essentially, it portrays the death penalty as necessary. Weebay confesses to avoid the death penalty. Although much of what he confesses to is bullshit, he leads the police to information which makes the case. The entire port case is made off of Sergei trying to avoid the death penalty.

I'm personally anti-death penalty, but to what extent do people agree with the Wire's portrayal?

Webay's confession wasn't beneficial for anything except police stats. He didn't implicate anyone, confessed to murders he didn't do and covered up the Barksdale connection on the rest. If anything it shows the danger of plea bargains. While there was a benefit to solve some unopened murders (saving further investigative efforts), it also let everybody else involved off the hook. Especially with the Baltimore police department, who will never reopen those cases once closed.

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hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

I think the OP is gone, but with some luck maybe a mod could edit in the links

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
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So there is this ultra competent killer guy. Who walks around in highly recognizable outfits and shot people in public places at broad daylight. He employs no stealth whatsoever and even revisits the same place regularly after shooting revengehappy gangbangers. He has never been apprehended or killed in a driveby because both police and the gangbangers are just too impressed with his professional demeanour.

I blame people who like Mouzone for all the bad shows on TV.

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Jerusalem posted:

Carver looks around at the other officers present, all of whom seem either embarrassed or amused, and realizes that things have gone too far. Taking an important step in his own development, Carver quietly tells Colicchio that he is going to write him up for excessive force and conduct unbecoming. Colicchio is horrified, his Sergeant-in-Charge isn't going to back him? Even now though, he's too stupid and short-sighted to react with anything but anger, and he declares angrily that if Carver charges him, then he is a rat. Carver, having finally realized you can only let so much slide in the name of protecting your own, replies calmly,"Then I'm a rat," and walks out the door, leaving Colicchio standing amongst the others, confused and angry, still no closer to understanding why he was in the wrong and that this is all a problem of his own making.

I believe Carver actually gets the nod from Michael Santangelo (the former Homicide detective).

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

meat sweats posted:

Wasn't the migration of users across the bridge to Joe's territory when Barksdale product was too diluted a plot point somewhere in the show?

Yes. Though in the first season, Stringer comments that "but poo poo is weak all over" or something similar

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Another small detail: When Kima and McNulty are staking out Omar's van, a girl from school walks past. She walks up to a house and knocks (so it is probably not her house) and is dressed up in all new bling. Each shot is just a second or two. But that's how Omar knew police was sitting on the van, he paid off some of the locals.

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Blind Melon posted:

That's not entirely true, Stringer does implement some of the stuff he learns. That's where he got the rebranding and false competition ideas, from talking to his professor.

Stringer did a similar thing in season 1 (rebranding a package with poor quality), so it wasn't all copycat.

In a way, both Stringer and McNulty have the same problem: They always believe that they are the smartest fucks in the room. And for a long time that has always been true, it has been months even, when they were the smartest fucks in the room.

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Jerusalem posted:

Also any other series would have Daniels be innocent, or have had NOBLE reasons for doing what he did etc.

It was one of the things that made the Wire so great :911:

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

3Romeo posted:

Season one, which is already pretty great, improves even more after finishing the series. There are some tiny bits of character that go over first-time viewers' heads, but on a second viewing add a lot to the show's overall story.

On the other hand, there are some camera techniques (eg Avon's slow-mo walk through The Pit) and some character differences (eg Rawls storming out of his office and shouting "MCNULTY") that are out of sync with the remaining seasons, but those instances are very minor and really don't detract from anything. Every show evolves.

The slow mo walk is weird, it's also the only scene (that I'm aware of) with sound effects coming from outside of the scene in that season*. I think it's the DVD commentary(?) that mentions that they explicitly wanted to avoid using music to tell the listener what to feel. So that every sound had to be natural to the scene. Which I think is one of the things that makes the shooting of Kima so emotionally powerful. Without the "emotional" music that every other tv-show had at times like this, it feels like more real life and hits harder.

The slow mo walk kinda works though, in that it tells you something about the power of Avon. Especially when you watch it a second time, when you know it's Stinkum (I think) and Stringer following him. But it only works because they didn't use music anywhere else in the season. Not using music to set the mood was the right choice all along, and they hosed up in this scene. It's a storytelling problem for TV overall I guess - use a trick once and it's amazing, use it more than twice and gently caress You I'm bored (switching chanels).

*Based on the same DVD commentary and not noticing any other counterexample on my third rewatch or whatever

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

PostNouveau posted:

It's a complicating factor for sure. But the big issue I have is that they're bringing it in in one big bulk shipment. So if that goes down, they lose millions of dollars and everyone in their local network goes to prison for a long, long time.

I would think real drug operations bring in large quantities by having a constant stream of small shipsments coming in. But I don't know anything about how that stuff works, so for all I know David Simon based this plot point on a real-life cartel.

Prop Joe alone bought 5 pounds of heroin a week, a shipment of ~150 pounds (the last shipment that the Police caught) was "small" (or it might have been kilos and not pounds, can't remember). At the quantities they were operating at, you can't make the shipments small enough to get significantly below maximum sentencing either way. It doesn't matter that much if you get caught smuggling 10 pounds or 150 pounds of pure heroin.

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Way early in season 1, mcnulty talks to the Fitz (the FBI guy). Fitz has had spectacular success in following up a CI Mcnulty gave to the feds. We even see the stash-house get busted live on camera. They also got the scent of some dominicans in New York. Not that the brasses give a poo poo - it would have been a career case :-/ , but nowadays it is only about counterterrorism. FBI might give up the dominicans in New York to the DEA or whatever though.

When Bird suggest that <some streets> are way open, it's probably because FBI has cleared out the professionals. ( I think it is the same baltimore area as Fitz mentions to McNulty??).
When the dominicans in New York get caught (which are Stringers supply), it might actually be because the Fitz has given his leads to someone else. And those agencies, probably DEA, has caught them up. Which had nothing to do with the wiretap McNulty had running on Stringer and co - though it was related to a previous investigations from McNulty.

Or maybe I a way off?

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

brylcreem posted:

I'm watching episode 4 of season 1 again.

Lester got a pager number off the wall of the stash house, and uses it to page D. And D calls back to Lester's cell phone.

But... since they're using that code thing, how come the call goes through? If D uses the code on a regular number, it's just random.

MAH IMMERSION!

The codes are for the callback numbers, not the pagers?

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

There are several legitimate concerns over police conduct, in particular with respect to racism.

Focusing on possible racism in a number thingy might distract from that though.

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hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

COMPAGNIE TOMMY posted:

But there's a remote possibility it's not racist and I will defend cops for reasons!!!!

Everyone deserves a defence for the remote possibilites. Glad to stand up for that.

Though my original point was about how we cope with police being racist or violent - maybe we should focus on getting those offenders in jail.
I care way much more about actual violent behavior from cops than some weird radio stuff where races are assigned to numbers on convenience.

I don't want to chastise baltimore police officers for assigning numbers on a radio.
I want to chastiste them if they infringe on any civil rights or are excessive violent.

If we cry wolf too many times, that distract from the real issues.

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