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Greg12
Apr 22, 2020


I'm worried about the shock he'll feel if he gets up to full speed before reaching the end of the leash. (and if the leash is tied to a stiff immovable object while we're sitting someplace.)

It sounds like tubular webbing has some bounce to bring him down from 20mph without hurting him. This is good because holy poo poo single rope is expensive!

Thanks, rock climbers!

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M. Night Skymall
Mar 22, 2012



Greg12 posted:

I'm worried about the shock he'll feel if he gets up to full speed before reaching the end of the leash. (and if the leash is tied to a stiff immovable object while we're sitting someplace.)

It sounds like tubular webbing has some bounce to bring him down from 20mph without hurting him. This is good because holy poo poo single rope is expensive!

Thanks, rock climbers!

If you ask around at a climbing gym you might be able to find retired ropes for cheap/free that you could use as a leash as well(Not sure about the insurance implications for this, climbing gyms used to be a lot less corporate than they are now). Webbing's not exactly what I'd call springy, when people say that they're just comparing it to dyneema or something which has no give at all. Perfectly safe to use as a leash though I'd think, I just wouldn't expect it to be noticeably stretchy..at all.

SwashedBuckles
Aug 10, 2007

Have at you!

BlancoNino posted:

My favorite least/most helpful thing to holler at my friends is "HIPS." You can almost always pull your hips in a bit more even if you've been climbing for years and years.

I think the most common thing we yell at each other is Come on, <blank>! You got this! Try hard! or Breathe! Which in retrospect would be wicked annoying if you didnt know the person yelling at you.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Trust your feet! lol

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

"just stand up!"

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

No Balls No Game


M. Night Skymall posted:

If you ask around at a climbing gym you might be able to find retired ropes for cheap/free that you could use as a leash as well(Not sure about the insurance implications for this, climbing gyms used to be a lot less corporate than they are now). Webbing's not exactly what I'd call springy, when people say that they're just comparing it to dyneema or something which has no give at all. Perfectly safe to use as a leash though I'd think, I just wouldn't expect it to be noticeably stretchy..at all.

Or ask on a local rock climbing facebook page to see if anyone has any old and beat up ropes that they're ready to retire.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Gyms that have a bouldering area as an afterthought to the autobelay walls are terrible.

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m
Apr 16, 2017

Í̝̰ ͓̯̖̫̹̯̤A҉m̺̩͝ ͇̬A̡̮̞̠͚͉̱̫ K̶e͓ǵ.̻̱̪͖̹̟̕


"Allez! Allezallezallez!" -- an expert I've never met, giving advice in to me in Bellingham

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m
Apr 16, 2017

Í̝̰ ͓̯̖̫̹̯̤A҉m̺̩͝ ͇̬A̡̮̞̠͚͉̱̫ K̶e͓ǵ.̻̱̪͖̹̟̕


Just realized that was at least a year ago now because the border has been closed lmao I miss seeing my family irl so much lol

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m posted:

"Allez! Allezallezallez!" -- an expert I've never met, giving advice in to me in Bellingham

Allez is the best loving advice. I say it all the time and I love when people say it. It's the best and I won't accept anyone who will critique allez in any way shape or form. The only thing I don't like is beta spraying because sometime that makes me doubt myself and halfway up the wall on something at my limit taking a break to analyze whatever they are saying is never a good idea. Just peer pressure me with some ALLEZ! so I give it all.

I can also accept stuff like "come on" even if it's inferior to allez.

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

Strained my lumbrical yesterday while 3 finger dragging and curling my pinky down. Half crimp and 4 finger open are not painful, 3 finger drag is ok if my pinky is not curled down, extremely painful if it does curl down.

Not finding a lot of ressources on that injury. Anyone went through this? wondering if climbing/training while buddy tapping so I can't curl my pinky is fine? there's 0 pain involved. I have an appointment with my PT but there's 2 week of wait time so...

artism
Nov 22, 2011



It's been an interesting experience climbing way heavier after a year long hiatus. 'Just when I thought I was out, they pulled me back in'. The weight is mostly useless muscle and some fat. The positive is that for the first time in my life I'm considering technique.

On that note, a very generous setter who I regularly impose upon told me to do this:

1. Hard day. One-two problems max. Projecting. Goal here isn't to send, but to learn how to do a new move or two. Eventually. In the past this has sometimes resulted in a send because there was one particularly elusive move that I felt was valuable to really spend time on, but the rest of the problem was relatively tame. Generally I have 10-20 attempts (depending on how many moves I can string together) that I spread between one to two problems depending on stoke.
2. Technical day. Climb things that I pulled or dyno'd through with technique. Climb slab. Repeat problems that I climbed like poo poo a couple of times until it feels more dialed in. Session length is probably around an hour.
3. Moderate day. Volume at current Max V-grade -1-3 (This suggestion is a little fungible. Sometimes there's a V6 that feels like a V4 because I can leap past the crux etc.). As many boulders as possible in an 1 to 1.5 hours, depending on pysche. Probably 1-2 minute rest between sets.

At the end of the session I like to do deadlifts and OHP with a kettlebell as a superset; inverted ring rows (since I favor steeper climbing) and L-sits for time as another superset. At the end I like to do a few turkish getups for more full body stability. I don't really consider this workout as a supplement to climbing. I do it to keep my body healthy. Takes around 30ish minutes to get it all in.

On my technical day I like to do single leg deadlifts and upturned KB press (so you're gripping it upside down - nice little forearm/shoulder girdle/scap stabilizing drill). Don't have it in me to hangboard, don't think finger strength is a limiting factor anyways (surprisingly).

Other than that, he told my tall rear end to get flexible. So I just sit in pigeon for five minutes a day and run through a couple hip mobility drills at night at home.

Not really sure what the purpose of this post is other than to provide a modicum of structure for people who have the same problem of overstaying in the gym as I do. Most of these little sessions take around an hour or two hours tops.

Also, I highly recommend the Dave MacLeod '9 out of 10 climbers' book, especially to the self-conscious in here. I've got a lot of brain problems and it's been sort of therapeutic to hear that they're a massive limiting factor.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



KingColliwog posted:

Strained my lumbrical yesterday while 3 finger dragging and curling my pinky down. Half crimp and 4 finger open are not painful, 3 finger drag is ok if my pinky is not curled down, extremely painful if it does curl down.

Not finding a lot of ressources on that injury. Anyone went through this? wondering if climbing/training while buddy tapping so I can't curl my pinky is fine? there's 0 pain involved. I have an appointment with my PT but there's 2 week of wait time so...

Not to shill for Dave MacLeod, but he has an injury bible that almost certainly addresses that exact injury, how to train with it, how to recover from it and other little nuggets of wisdom. I don't own it or I'd gladly post his advice.

Second point: the general consensus re: rehab is that stopping activity entirely is basically the worst thing you can do. Been mulling over whether to post this next bit of advice for a few minutes now - caveat emptor etc. - but light static loading (on the a 20ish mm edge) with very little weight might do the trick. There are many ways to reduce weight on a hangboard, the safest might be to just stand under it in openhand (since you can't curl down) and weight the hand without cutting your feet from the floor.

e: double post.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


artism posted:

Not to shill for Dave MacLeod, but he has an injury bible that almost certainly addresses that exact injury, how to train with it, how to recover from it and other little nuggets of wisdom. I don't own it or I'd gladly post his advice.


Here is the only section that mentioned lumbricals. The pages ended up out of order in the upload, they're 1, 3, 2.

https://imgur.com/a/2NCVOVm

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

Wow thanks guys, this just confirms what I thought so I'll get back on the hangboard monday and see how it goes. Hopefully I can still climb "hard" when the gym reopens and it doesn't ruin my summer. Pockets are out for 2021 I think.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Electoral Surgery posted:

Here is the only section that mentioned lumbricals. The pages ended up out of order in the upload, they're 1, 3, 2.

https://imgur.com/a/2NCVOVm

Ty sexy Tyler . Also sorry

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Niyqor posted:

Power Company

I also did a program with them, and think a write-up of my experience might be useful to anyone considering contracting a remote coach. My program pertained only to bouldering.

I think PC excels at developing strength, but almost no one in this thread is at a point where the sort of strength they help you develop is necessary. The exception to this rule might be core strength, which you can develop on the wall if you have decent kinesthetic awareness. Admittedly, many of us do not. The kneeling palof press was a particularly useful anti-rotational core exercise. The turkish getup continues to teach me a lot about full body tension.

One of my best climbing buds is insanely weak, so weak that he cannot do five pull-ups or twenty pushups consecutively. I also seriously doubt that he has much core strength. He's also 6'3" and 210+ with terrible diet and recovery habits. What little strength he does have he applies much better than me, in spite of my (vastly) superior strength, because he is a much better climber than I am. He consistently outclimbs me indoors and outdoors because he can channel a level of focus and effort that I am only now realizing I can/could not (but will. Through deliberate effort, I will get better at trying harder). He regularly climbs V6/7/8 outside, in all styles (except maybe roofs). I've climbed a handful of V6s and a 7 that was particularly gym-like. For the new people who predominantly climb inside (like me, I prefer it), I have no idea what he regularly climbs inside anymore. He rarely climbs inside, but I'm sure that it'll probably be around V7/8 when I drag his rear end back in here. I've had to project virtually every indoor V7 I've ever tried in spite of being strong and skilled enough to do them in a single session. Every indoor V8 (2) I ever did took the entire length of the set. Were the grades even reflective of those levels of difficulty? Maybe. Probably not. But also, who gives a poo poo?

My friend is the sort of person who would benefit from strength training. I am confident that he has the try-hard, technique and boldness required to climb much harder than he currently does. But he enjoys climbing the grades he's currently climbing because he's not fueled by ego, but by a sense of adventure and fun.

The point I am trying to make is that time would be better spent just cultivating a more empowered sense of your current capabilities. And to consider seriously that the reason that you didn't send had nothing to do with power or strength, but your lack of vision and commitment. Even indoors, most good climbers seem to employ so much more microbeta; are thinking so much harder about applying pressure through their toes, or pulling their hips in, or repositioning their heel/toe hooks, or stepping on the flat/rounded footholds, or even the giant volumes, in precisely the right spot where they will be able to generate more power than you can from the stiff position you keep finding, launching and flailing from. They also commit to moves way harder because they're both confident that they will either succeed or learn something from the attempt, and because they're less afraid. And some of them rarely think at all and do all these things intuitively because they've gone through all of this already. All of these things require a lot more effort than just pulling or tensing your core harder.

It's taken me around three years to have this epiphany. Arrogance and negativity caused me to ignore the advice of people who literally boulder at twice my grade level (and who, for the most part, eschew supplementary training, sometimes even hangboarding, entirely. Good enough for V13/14). I had many built-in excuses: 'MY BOX FORCES ME TO CLIMB DIFFERENT!'; 'My legs are so heavy !!! D: '; and most pathetically, "well I want to climb powerfully anyways, so I'm just gonna stick to my beta (that I'm not even close to executing).'

But back to the skilled climbers who generously offered me their time. Their advice to me was and remains the following: try harder; try to climb more technically; think more about your feet; focus more; rest more; be less afraid (incidentally, this is a decision that you have the power to make); spray less (this had been a big problem - a lot of validation-seeking behavior); remove all expectations; be less anxious; enjoy defeat. This is a skill sport taken up by people who are largely selfish, obsessive and borderline autistic. No one cares about your climbing but you.

So now I don't even think about my additional lifting as part of my climbing. I just do the minimal effective dose to keep my spine and shoulders healthy. And because I genuinely enjoy shoulder pressing and deadlifting.

Actually, I do one-arm ring rows, too. But with minimal effort - I'm mostly just trying to learn how to engage my scapula more effectively.

e: responding to a several months old post, hehe. Still, this appears to be the most recurring discussion.

artism fucked around with this message at 03:42 on Mar 2, 2021

Cybor Tap
Jul 13, 2001



Hey climbing homies. I haven't poked my nose into this forum in a long time. I'm stoked this thread is still alive and kicking. I can't believe this thread is still alive and kicking, it started 8 years ago. When SA was just a wee apple of the internet's eye I was given the task of creating a climbing mega-thread as a long time contributor in this area of the forums.

Does anyone have any suggestions of edits to be made to the first page? Perhaps we close this thread and start a new thread that isn't 200 pages long?

Well since you asked, I hurt my back and stopped climbing for a couple years. I now live in Durango, CO and climb incredibly non-competitively. More leisurely. Semi-retired even. There's just so many fun activities to partake in in this part of Colorado! Colorado is making a come back in my life. I'm excited for spring.

Shall we edit or close?

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Don't close it. Just let it ride. Welcome to CO, great place to be.

Ubiquitus
Nov 20, 2011



artism posted:

I also did a program with them, and think a write-up of my experience might be useful to anyone considering contracting a remote coach. My program pertained only to bouldering.

I think PC excels at developing strength, but almost no one in this thread is at a point where the sort of strength they help you develop is necessary. The exception to this rule might be core strength, which you can develop on the wall if you have decent kinesthetic awareness. Admittedly, many of us do not. The kneeling palof press was a particularly useful anti-rotational core exercise. The turkish getup continues to teach me a lot about full body tension.

One of my best climbing buds is insanely weak, so weak that he cannot do five pull-ups or twenty pushups consecutively. I also seriously doubt that he has much core strength. He's also 6'3" and 210+ with terrible diet and recovery habits. What little strength he does have he applies much better than me, in spite of my (vastly) superior strength, because he is a much better climber than I am. He consistently outclimbs me indoors and outdoors because he can channel a level of focus and effort that I am only now realizing I can/could not (but will. Through deliberate effort, I will get better at trying harder). He regularly climbs V6/7/8 outside, in all styles (except maybe roofs). I've climbed a handful of V6s and a 7 that was particularly gym-like. For the new people who predominantly climb inside (like me, I prefer it), I have no idea what he regularly climbs inside anymore. He rarely climbs inside, but I'm sure that it'll probably be around V7/8 when I drag his rear end back in here. I've had to project virtually every indoor V7 I've ever tried in spite of being strong and skilled enough to do them in a single session. Every indoor V8 (2) I ever did took the entire length of the set. Were the grades even reflective of those levels of difficulty? Maybe. Probably not. But also, who gives a poo poo?

My friend is the sort of person who would benefit from strength training. I am confident that he has the try-hard, technique and boldness required to climb much harder than he currently does. But he enjoys climbing the grades he's currently climbing because he's not fueled by ego, but by a sense of adventure and fun.

The point I am trying to make is that time would be better spent just cultivating a more empowered sense of your current capabilities. And to consider seriously that the reason that you didn't send had nothing to do with power or strength, but your lack of vision and commitment. Even indoors, most good climbers seem to employ so much more microbeta; are thinking so much harder about applying pressure through their toes, or pulling their hips in, or repositioning their heel/toe hooks, or stepping on the flat/rounded footholds, or even the giant volumes, in precisely the right spot where they will be able to generate more power than you can from the stiff position you keep finding, launching and flailing from. They also commit to moves way harder because they're both confident that they will either succeed or learn something from the attempt, and because they're less afraid. And some of them rarely think at all and do all these things intuitively because they've gone through all of this already. All of these things require a lot more effort than just pulling or tensing your core harder.

It's taken me around three years to have this epiphany. Arrogance and negativity caused me to ignore the advice of people who literally boulder at twice my grade level (and who, for the most part, eschew supplementary training, sometimes even hangboarding, entirely. Good enough for V13/14). I had many built-in excuses: 'MY BOX FORCES ME TO CLIMB DIFFERENT!'; 'My legs are so heavy !!! D: '; and most pathetically, "well I want to climb powerfully anyways, so I'm just gonna stick to my beta (that I'm not even close to executing).'

But back to the skilled climbers who generously offered me their time. Their advice to me was and remains the following: try harder; try to climb more technically; think more about your feet; focus more; rest more; be less afraid (incidentally, this is a decision that you have the power to make); spray less (this had been a big problem - a lot of validation-seeking behavior); remove all expectations; be less anxious; enjoy defeat. This is a skill sport taken up by people who are largely selfish, obsessive and borderline autistic. No one cares about your climbing but you.

So now I don't even think about my additional lifting as part of my climbing. I just do the minimal effective dose to keep my spine and shoulders healthy. And because I genuinely enjoy shoulder pressing and deadlifting.

Actually, I do one-arm ring rows, too. But with minimal effort - I'm mostly just trying to learn how to engage my scapula more effectively.

e: responding to a several months old post, hehe. Still, this appears to be the most recurring discussion.

Climbing inside doesnt replace climbing outside. If you want to be successful climbing outside you I need to do more of it

Anachronist
Feb 13, 2009




I just skimmed the OP and I feel like it holds up pretty well. I dont know if restarting the thread will bring more interest or any new people into the mix. Id add in some blurb about free solo the movie and how thats exactly what all of us do every time we climb outside, call it good and let the thread keep going.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Ubiquitus posted:

Climbing inside doesnt replace climbing outside. If you want to be successful climbing outside you I need to do more of it

Uh, agreed? I was long-windedly saying that most of us probably don't need to get stronger, just better, more confident and more committed to the moves that we're trying to execute. This pertains to both inside and outside.

Also, while the gym is clearly not a replacement for real rock, a lot of the intangibles, such as the application of effort and the confidence you develop, carry over. It's why the comp kids are all climbing V16 now (also because they climbed outside a lot - but clearly most of their time climbing has been spent in the gym). But to completely contradict my initial point, it's also because they got strong as poo poo climbing in the gym.

artism fucked around with this message at 05:11 on Mar 3, 2021

nacon
May 7, 2005



I definitely hit a plateau in my outdoor-climbing, despite getting stronger at the gym. Once the pandemic hit, and I only climbed outdoors all year, my outdoor climbing improved 100%. There's really no replacement for just doing it, a lot, to build technique (I was objectively weaker, strength-wise, than when I was in the gym.)

Now, when I go back to the gym, I feel a lot more focused and effective in how I train. I barely touch the big walls in the gym outside of an endurance day or two every week - bouldering translates to faster, more efficient strength/technique gains for me.

So there's a place for the gym, though I think a large base of outdoor climbing translated to better use of the gym for me.

Cybor Tap
Jul 13, 2001



Okie doke. No closing of the thread. Glad the community is going strong and answering all the same questions about tendon injuries and getting past plateaus!

Seriously. That poo poo is tough. As long as we're all having fun climbing, life is pretty good.

Endjinneer
Aug 17, 2005


Fallen Rib

artism posted:

The point I am trying to make is that time would be better spent just cultivating a more empowered sense of your current capabilities. And to consider seriously that the reason that you didn't send had nothing to do with power or strength, but your lack of vision and commitment. Even indoors, most good climbers seem to employ so much more microbeta; are thinking so much harder about applying pressure through their toes, or pulling their hips in, or repositioning their heel/toe hooks, or stepping on the flat/rounded footholds, or even the giant volumes, in precisely the right spot where they will be able to generate more power than you can from the stiff position you keep finding, launching and flailing from. They also commit to moves way harder because they're both confident that they will either succeed or learn something from the attempt, and because they're less afraid. And some of them rarely think at all and do all these things intuitively because they've gone through all of this already. All of these things require a lot more effort than just pulling or tensing your core harder.

Just climb slabs. More slabs. Slabs all the time. Slabs forever.
Good post though.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Endjinneer posted:

Just climb slabs. More slabs. Slabs all the time. Slabs forever.

That's good advice. The brilliance of slab is that we almost always know what to do, but don't do it.

beat9
Aug 19, 2005



Endjinneer posted:

Just climb slabs. More slabs. Slabs all the time. Slabs forever.
Good post though.

Yeah, definitely this. My footwork improved a lot when I had some shoulder issues and only climbed slabs for half a season. I was way more confident and sure of my self afterwards and less afraid as well. Slabs are the best.

magicalmako
Feb 13, 2005


beat9 posted:

Slabs are the best.

This is a funny way to say overhangs.

But yes I need to get over myself and climb slab to improve my mental game and footwork.

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

Slabs are my favourite and where I perform best. I do think it's a huge part of my relatively fast progress, but I''m also still super terrible at everything overhanging. That's starting to change thanks to 40 degree board climbing though.

I guess what I'm saying is do slab and board climbing only everyday.

nacon
May 7, 2005



magicalmako posted:

This is a funny way to say overhangs.

But yes I need to get over myself and climb slab to improve my mental game and footwork.

Well, in Boulder Canyon and Clear Creek Canyon you can have both! Slab->overhang->Slab->Overhang all in the same climb!

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



magicalmako posted:

This is a funny way to say overhangs.

But yes I need to get over myself and climb slab to improve my mental game and footwork.

This made me laugh a whole bunch.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



KingColliwog posted:

Slabs are my favourite and where I perform best. I do think it's a huge part of my relatively fast progress, but I''m also still super terrible at everything overhanging. That's starting to change thanks to 40 degree board climbing though.

I guess what I'm saying is do slab and board climbing only everyday.

Just train your weaknesses. If youre good at pulling you need to think more about your feet and vice versa.

Everyones seen those older people at the gym who climb with insane style and grace. It took me awhile to admit that theyre much better at climbing than me, even if Id (horrifically) send harder problems. I think style matters a lot and focusing on not looking like poo poo is a surefire way to improve

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

artism posted:

Everyones seen those older people at the gym who climb with insane style and grace. It took me awhile to admit that theyre much better at climbing than me, even if Id (horrifically) send harder problems. I think style matters a lot and focusing on not looking like poo poo is a surefire way to improve

It's also one of the most fun thing to do for me at least. Feeling like I'm doing a problem perfectly is almost as fun as climbing a really hard grade (to me) problem. That,s probably I like slab so much and tend to repeat them many times when I manage to get a really hard one.

Oh yeah gyms reopening on monday here! God I'm psyched. Already booked my first 3-4 hour long session that will end in 1 hour when my skin is getting bloody!

KingColliwog fucked around with this message at 21:08 on Mar 4, 2021

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m
Apr 16, 2017

Í̝̰ ͓̯̖̫̹̯̤A҉m̺̩͝ ͇̬A̡̮̞̠͚͉̱̫ K̶e͓ǵ.̻̱̪͖̹̟̕


The Shin Reaper posted:

Just climb slabs. More slabs. Slabs all the time. Slabs forever.
Good post though.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



I hope this is a dumb question, but as a programmer for work the idea of finger injuries scare me

On Tuesday I was working on a sort of crimpy/sloper problem on my gym's ~40 wall near my V-max. I think I merely popped a blood vessel, I didn't tear the skin but a dark red circle appeared in the middle of my middle finger. The color mostly went away and now it's light pink and kinda white:



I get a mild pinching sensation if I make a fist, however it doesn't really hurt. Does this sound / look like something I should be concerned about? Or just take a few days off climbing? I wanna send that fucker

Ubiquitus
Nov 20, 2011



Looks fine to me, just some dead skin that hasnt ton off? You can cut it with some nail clippers and use some climbing salve on it if you want to speed it up

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Yeah, looks like a blood blister that has since drained? I'm a programmer climber and would climb with that, assuming that the sting pain is surface level, like a blister would cause.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



I just image searched a blood blister and mine didn't look nearly so horrific, maybe it's just a little baby blood blister though

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

Just look like some superficial damage. I'd put some tape over it and climb.

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artism
Nov 22, 2011



Don't know how I missed this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRrd3wyXhT8

I think I'm gonna stop doing any training other than a little bit of core and stretching and just focus really hard on trying hard every session. What an insane sport

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