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Teeter
Jul 21, 2005

Hey guys! I'm having a good time, what about you?

Have any REI stores nearby? They've got some stuff to try on at typical retail prices, but their used gear sales have things marked down quite a bit. My buddy got a pair of Evolv Defys for $10 but it's real hit or miss what you can find.

Teeter fucked around with this message at 04:24 on Dec 23, 2012

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modig
Aug 20, 2002


Petey posted:

What's the best way to buy new shoes? My climbing buddy told me he just orders anything promising off Zappos and then returns the rest. Anyone else have other ideas, trusted brands, state of the art suggestions, etc?

If your technique sucks, try finding routes that work on your weaknesses and take away your strengths!

I have always just gone into a store and tried on shoes until I had a pair a I liked. If you do that, you should buy it at the store, even if it costs a bit more, consider is paying for the opportunity to try on shoes.

One thing I did recently in terms of working on my weaknesses... I flashed two problems that were kind of hard but not crazy for me. Then I watched some random guy climb them both way differently than I had. So then I climbed them again, using his beta instead of mine.

Blog Free or Die
Apr 30, 2005

FOR THE MOTHERLAND

Yeah, I like to do that whenever my gym puts up new stuff. Try to send what I can with whatever crazy/stupid beta I can, then check out alternate approaches on subsequent visits. I've noticed I've started climbing a lot better because of this, using a lot more backsteps/hand crosses and clean static moves than I would normally.

Plus it's fun striking up conversation with people on what beta they prefer on weirdass problems that don't seem to have any 'proper' route.

Tropomyosin
Nov 13, 2012


Frown Town posted:

If anything, it looks really cool.

Heck yeah it does! And if people ever say, "Wait, aerial gymnastics? What's that?" You just get to say, "Oh, you know that stuff they do in Cirque du Soleil? Yeah, that's what I do." And then strike a rock and roll pose and everyone in the room starts applauding. Hope you enjoy it!

On topic of this thread, what are peoples' feelings about use of bolt holes during gym climbing? I know there's the risk of breaking off a finger if you fall, but is it actually considered a feature if you can pull it off?

TrinityOfDeath
Mar 18, 2009


I don't know what they would say in a real competition. I climb at a little university gym and I don't see people use them, mostly because of the danger of losing a finger. If the route is set well, there should be no need to use them and I would try to avoid them. They are there, after all, to have holds bolted in to them, not to have fingers stuck in them.

I don't have super-extensive outdoor experience, but I have only found one boulder problem with a mono-pocket out in Brecksville, OH. I can't imagine it is a super common feature.

Teeter
Jul 21, 2005

Hey guys! I'm having a good time, what about you?

Tropomyosin posted:

Heck yeah it does! And if people ever say, "Wait, aerial gymnastics? What's that?" You just get to say, "Oh, you know that stuff they do in Cirque du Soleil? Yeah, that's what I do." And then strike a rock and roll pose and everyone in the room starts applauding. Hope you enjoy it!

On topic of this thread, what are peoples' feelings about use of bolt holes during gym climbing? I know there's the risk of breaking off a finger if you fall, but is it actually considered a feature if you can pull it off?

Aerial gymnastics seems pretty awesome. I like slacklining, which is great for balance, but wouldn't even know where to start with some crazy Cirque du Soleil stuff. I also ice skate, which is an odd form of cross-training but it's great for legs! I've strange combination of hobbies for being a dude in LA.

I personally don't bother with bolt holes, especially since the last thing I want to do when I'm training is hurt myself. Kinda like open hand vs crimping, if it's a real send attempt then do whatever it takes but for the sake of training it's best to take it easy. Hell, I barely even touch pockets in the gym because it's just not worth it. As for an "official" stance on it, a competition I was at had it in the rules that bolt holes could be used as footholds but not for hands so maybe that's a good way to look at it.

e: Big shoes, little shoes

Teeter fucked around with this message at 19:37 on Dec 24, 2012

modig
Aug 20, 2002


I hit up Hangar 18 in Upland, which is in LA somewhere. It's not as nice a Movement, but it was a fine gym. The routes were harder for the same grade, though I'm not fully sure why. There were more routes that had reachy enough moves that my wife needed intermediate foot holds that weren't there. The holds are older and more worn out (smooth), and they often paint them to make enough holds of the same color to set a route without tape. Painting them seems like a bad idea to me. I managed to send a V4 that was pretty sweet, with more work and more dynamic moves than a V6 normally takes me at Movement. I'll go back for another day of vacation workout.

Teeter
Jul 21, 2005

Hey guys! I'm having a good time, what about you?

modig posted:

I hit up Hangar 18 in Upland, which is in LA somewhere. It's not as nice a Movement, but it was a fine gym. The routes were harder for the same grade, though I'm not fully sure why. There were more routes that had reachy enough moves that my wife needed intermediate foot holds that weren't there. The holds are older and more worn out (smooth), and they often paint them to make enough holds of the same color to set a route without tape. Painting them seems like a bad idea to me. I managed to send a V4 that was pretty sweet, with more work and more dynamic moves than a V6 normally takes me at Movement. I'll go back for another day of vacation workout.

This is my spot so it's cool to see someone else post about it. Hangar 18 started in Upland and it's pretty homely to me but it's local and I love it. They've been successful enough to expand to a few other locations, with Riverside being the most notable to me. They've learned a lot throughout the years so Riverside was built from the ground up a few years ago to be a great climbing experience. It makes Upland look ghetto in comparison and I'd recommend checking it out if you're nearby. Upland has high quality climbs but the facility as a whole is lacking compared to others, which is fine for me because my membership applies to all gyms so I can climb daily at Upland but make the trek to Riverside occasionally went I want to spend a whole afternoon climbing with friends.


As for painting holds, I've mentioned it here and people think it's crazy because every other gym uses tape but I just can't see it that way. I have in no way noticed any detrimental effect at all that it could have on the holds, it simply makes the wall look much more organized in seeing how a route takes shape. They benefit because the gym owner also runs Climb-It Holds so there's a wide variety of shapes/colors at their disposal, but a bit of color-coding after the fact works out nicely.

e: found an awesome video tour!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0HXJTtgDsg

e2: I'm looking to go to grad school and Boulder is one of my top choices so hopefully I'll get a chance to check out Movement with some of you CO goons!

Teeter fucked around with this message at 22:20 on Dec 24, 2012

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Thanks for the riverside tip, not sure we'll drive the extra 30 minutes, but it does look nicer. I think either tape or solid color holds work fine (Movement now does both), but paint seems like it's going to make the holds get slippery faster. Also with solid color holds it helps a lot when they are clean and fresh so the color is easy to see, and a lot of the routes at the upland gym had color that were hard to see. Mostly I think its just what you are used to. I'm just happy to have a decent gym so I can workout a bit on vacation.

Good luck with grad school.

T-1000
Mar 28, 2010


Tropomyosin posted:

On topic of this thread, what are peoples' feelings about use of bolt holes during gym climbing? I know there's the risk of breaking off a finger if you fall, but is it actually considered a feature if you can pull it off?
It's doable but I'd say it's really really dumb. If you slip just a bit you can break your finger very easily. You shouldn't really need to use them anyway.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Tropomyosin posted:

On topic of this thread, what are peoples' feelings about use of bolt holes during gym climbing? I know there's the risk of breaking off a finger if you fall, but is it actually considered a feature if you can pull it off?

Bolt holes are never "on route". No one will set problems that intentionally include a bolt hole. They are just a side effect of the way walls are built, and you are cheating (and endangering your fingers) if you use them.

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



Merry Christmas!

...but climbing in a wool sweater is not worth the irony. My arms are still itchy.

TheMadMilkman
Dec 10, 2007



Petey posted:

I think I need some new shoes.

If they fit, buy a pair of La Sportiva Miuras. Then forget about ever buying another shoe ever again.

Petey
Nov 25, 2005

I returned and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but the Patriots secondary happeneth to them all.

- Ecclesiastes

Got the black diamond harness / atc / biner / chalk kit *and* a 10 visit punch card to my local gym for Christmas: http://amzn.to/Vv3t3B

Going to try on some shoes at my local gym and go from there.

e: actually, I figured I'd post some more info on my current shoes; if anyone has any guidance, then that would be great, and if not, at least my post might be helpful.

I have Bufo Weapons. I ordered them through a friend in 2006 ("hey, we're getting a group discount on climbing shoes. want it?" "sure!") and have been using them since. They don't appear to be widely distributed. The only review I could find was on http://www.worldclimb.com/profiles_index/2916.php:

quote:

I've probably worn 200 rock shoes over the past decade, but good shoes for under a hundred bucks have proven a rare commodity. The Bufo Weapon, is proudly in the minority. With two young children at home, my climbing trips have become less frequent, as evidenced by my puny forearms and jerky footwork. The bright side is that my rusty condition makes me the ideal shoe tester -- I must rely entirely on leather and rubber to get me up the stone. The Weapon gave me just the leg up I need. A low-cut sport shoe with a moderately stiff midsole, slightly asymmetrical last and firm yet sticky rubber, it climbs well beyond its pricetag. A slightly pointed toe wriggles into mono pods, yet yields enough front-point power and precision to press off the smallest chip. The generous sticky rand and heel can grip aretes with the best of 'em. Comfort and fit-wise, the Weapon feels more like an all-around shoe than foot-crushing sport wear. A great relief for feet -- and pocket-books -- alike.











It's hard for me to say whether these shoes are good or bad since it's been so long since I've climbed in anything else. With that said, here are some of the reasons I am considering other shoes:

* I think they are too small in several dimensions. I have duck feet (narrow heel, wide sole, zero arch) and these shoes seem to kind of pinch them together in an uncomfortable way, not only horizontally but vertically. If I try to stand on my toe on the wall, the *top* of the shoe pushes down on my big toenail very intensely, making it too painful to really stand on my toes in places.

* They seem to not have that great of a grip. Which is weird, because the Bufo reviews are pretty good for rubber, but I have trouble trusting my feet precisely because these shoes seem to slip quite easily. They don't seem to stick to the rock the way other folks' seem to. Is being stored in cold weather bad for rubber? I usually keep my gear in my trunk.

* The laces are great for cinching up tight, but wag around and get in the way, so I'd be interested in trying a velcro shoe of some kind.

I will be climbing almost entirely within rock gyms and love to boulder if that helps.

Petey fucked around with this message at 19:00 on Dec 25, 2012

Casual Encountess
Dec 14, 2005

"You can see how they go from being so sweet to tearing your face off,
just like that,
and it's amazing to have that range."

Thunderdome Exclusive


Am I going to die if I wear my Fei-yue martial art shoes climbing? They're super simple canvas shoes with heavy rubber treads intended for, well martial arts but they're awesome for parkour and that kind of stuff. They're super grippy but they don't have the kind of support my climbing shoes do.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Grandmaster.flv posted:

Am I going to die if I wear my Fei-yue martial art shoes climbing? They're super simple canvas shoes with heavy rubber treads intended for, well martial arts but they're awesome for parkour and that kind of stuff. They're super grippy but they don't have the kind of support my climbing shoes do.

Yes and on top of that you will look like an idiot. You want really stiff shoes for climbing, not something that is good for parkour. Just rent some shoes.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Just hit Vertical Endeavors in Warrenville IL on Saturday for the first time. My second climbing place ever, after Upper Limits in Bloomington. UL was a bunch of 65' soybean silos converted to climbing, so it was almost all flat concrete walls with holds strategically placed, and each route had its own space (so no tape anywhere). VE was the is-fake-but-looks-real rock stuff with some holds bolted in, and every route had tape on it (with some routes converging/crossing over).

It was pretty hard to focus on a single color. Is that a skill that grows with time? Seemed to make climbing a lot hrader.

I enjoyed climbing on the real/fake rocks. Using naturals was something completely new, and added a fair amount of atmosphere to the whole thing. Forced me to think well outside the box of "what hold do I use next" more toward "what ARE the holds near me? What can I use as a hold?" So that was fun.

And, of course, my forearms are shot to poo poo. Good times.

Niyqor
Dec 1, 2003

Paid for by the meat council of America

Pander posted:

It was pretty hard to focus on a single color. Is that a skill that grows with time?

You get better at it. I usually climb at a smaller gym in Chicago (LVAC) where each rope has 6-12 routes that use that rope. This leads to a lot of shared holds and lots of tap all over the place.

When I first started climbing there I found it annoying and somewhat difficult to pick out the right colors, now it is only an issue if different routes are using too similar of colors.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Niyqor posted:

You get better at it. I usually climb at a smaller gym in Chicago (LVAC) where each rope has 6-12 routes that use that rope. This leads to a lot of shared holds and lots of tap all over the place.

When I first started climbing there I found it annoying and somewhat difficult to pick out the right colors, now it is only an issue if different routes are using too similar of colors.

I went again yesterday and did better. The one odd thing is still on overhangs when I have NO idea where my feet are going, whether the footholds I use are legal or not. I suppose more communication with my belayer is required.

Positive note: callouses are reforming! Yay!

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



25% off of petzl ropes at justropes.com for the rest of the day.

Code: pz2013

Blog Free or Die
Apr 30, 2005

FOR THE MOTHERLAND

Pander posted:

I went again yesterday and did better. The one odd thing is still on overhangs when I have NO idea where my feet are going, whether the footholds I use are legal or not. I suppose more communication with my belayer is required.

If you see a big overhang coming up, it's useful to take a few seconds when you can and try to figure out your feet ahead of time, like, "Okay, I can start with my feet there, then once I start moving up there's that jug I can move a foot up to."

Or just do so many pullups you can just campus 'til you're above the overhang

smertrioslol
Apr 4, 2010


So I climbed today for the first time in six months, and I think for the fourth time ever. Totally stoked about finishing a V3 for the first time. I've always been really interested in it, but due to living in North Dakota and having a really limited schedule I haven't been able to manage it. This has changed! I found an indoor gym in my city (the only one within 200 miles, by the way) and I plan on going there regularly when I get home from vacation. Now, I've only done bouldering thus far, but the gym that I plan on going to is belay only. What sort of stuff do I need to buy for this, or is it typically provided? In that same vein of questioning, is there a good place to buy stuff that will help with sizing? I don't have weird shaped feet, but every time I've gone climbing, I have to get a different sized rental shoe.

I'm also buying that book that someone suggested earlier in the thread, looks like a good read, even if a lot of it won't be accessible to me just yet.

gently caress, I can't wait to fly home and climb again, I'm in love

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

You finished a V3 on your 4th ever day climbing, after a 6 month break? You should feel pretty drat proud. I know some folks who have been climbing two or three days a week for over a year that aren't climbing V3s.

As for a belay-only gym, the first thing you will need is a partner. (There are "auto-belays" in some gyms which allow you to top-rope alone, but from my experience they are not very common.) Most gyms have some kind of forum or listserve to help you find a climbing partner. If you take that route, you will be most successful if you can consistently climb on the same day and time each week. People prefer reliable climbing partners. Assuming that you find yourself a climbing partner, then you will need a harness, belay-device of some sort (I suggest learning on an ATC), a locking carabiner for the belay device, and shoes. Some gyms will have you clip into a pre-tied rope, and if your gym does this you will need another locking carabiner or two, it is pretty uncommon though. Some gyms actually have belay devices already hooked up on all of their ropes, in which case you won't need to get an ATC/carabiner. This is also pretty uncommon, but worth finding out before you run out and buy gear.

Pretty much every gym has equipment on hand that you can rent, but if you plan to go regularly you will save money in the long run if you buy your own. Also you will need to learn how to belay. (I assume you don't already know how, mostly because you are asking these questions.) Gyms will typically offer a top-roping class where, among a few other things, they teach you how to belay and get you certified to belay at their gym.

You can get the harness and ATC/Carabiner online (I would recommend amazon), or at a local REI or EMS, or a smaller climbing shop if you have one near you. Black Diamond sells a package that includes the ATC and a locking carabiner together, which makes life easy. I would suggest getting shoes at an EMS or REI so that you can try on a variety of different ones. Climbing shoes should be tight, although they don't need to be painfully tight. My first pair of climbing shoes were very snug, but I could leave them on my feet for hours without pain. Shoe salespeople might try to steer you into a pair of shoes that is too tight for you to start with, because that is the fit a more experience climber might prefer.

So, I would suggest you do this:
- Call the gym and see how much an intro top-roping course costs, and if it gets you belay certified at the gym. Ask if that price includes rental equipment. This will be more expensive than just paying for a day pass, but it will get you belay certified at the gym. Without that you will have a very hard time finding a climbing partner.
- Assuming that is agreeable, go take the class
- When you are there, ask about finding climbing partners. Someone else in the class with you may be interested too, you never know.
- You can also use this visit to find out what their setup is. Do they have auto-belays? Will you need to bring your own belay device?
- Find a climbing partner
- Go get a harness, shoes, and whatever other gear you will need.
- Climb

smertrioslol
Apr 4, 2010



Thanks! I did some research online and they do offer a belay class next Thursday. I'm very likely going to drag my room mate along on my adventures, since he's my "normal" gym partner anyway.

JustAnother Fat Guy
Dec 22, 2009

Go to hell, and take your cheap suit with you!

Don't suppose anyone knows of outdoor places to climb/boulder in or around Texas? I am from the UK and meeting a client in the states in a few months and thought might take a few extra days off to climb whilst I am there. I tend to climb in the F7c/5.13a if the climb suits me, and on a good day I will send a V8. In reality though the grade doesn't matter, just wondering what it's like around there but I have heard it is pretty flat so anywhere that is a day drive away would be nice as well.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Where in Texas as it is huge and takes a long time to drive places.

JustAnother Fat Guy
Dec 22, 2009

Go to hell, and take your cheap suit with you!

Well I'll be staying in Houston. I don't mind driving 18 hours or so if it means I get to climb.

GobiasIndustries
Dec 14, 2007



Lipstick Apathy

Went climbing for the first time in 10 years in December and absolutely loved it; scheduling problems with my friend have prevented us from going again, but Christmas was good to me this year:


I picked up the shoes myself, and my parents got me a climbing kit that was good but didn't fit, so I took it back for the Edelrid harness and Black Diamond carabiner and ATC. A local store offers free chalk refills for life if you buy their brand of chalk bag so I'm picking that up soon too. Next on my list is learning how to belay; I learned how to in HS but it's been almost 10 years now; not that it seems difficult, I just need to make sure I know how to do it properly. I've only cleared 5.7 walls so far, but I really think the sport suits me; it feels like a physical puzzle which I think is awesome.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

Don't suppose anyone knows of outdoor places to climb/boulder in or around Texas? I am from the UK and meeting a client in the states in a few months and thought might take a few extra days off to climb whilst I am there. I tend to climb in the F7c/5.13a if the climb suits me, and on a good day I will send a V8. In reality though the grade doesn't matter, just wondering what it's like around there but I have heard it is pretty flat so anywhere that is a day drive away would be nice as well.

You might bet better localer recommendations, but I think Hueco Tanks is in Texas and it is definitely one of the premiere bouldering destinations in the US. They only allow a limited number of people into the area per day, so look it up and plan ahead.

pbpancho
Feb 17, 2004
-=International Sales=-

modig posted:

You might bet better localer recommendations, but I think Hueco Tanks is in Texas and it is definitely one of the premiere bouldering destinations in the US. They only allow a limited number of people into the area per day, so look it up and plan ahead.

Horseshoe Canyon Ranch in Jasper, AR is just 9hrs from Houston, probably closer than Hueco and has a ton of sport and trad. Wichita Mts. Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma has climbing too, only 7ish hours away. I'd choose HCR though.

SpoonMenace
Dec 6, 2004
www.people.ku.edu/
~sweisbro/Rejected.gif


Reimer's Ranch and Enchanted Rock are near Austin Texas if you're up for driving 4 hours west of houston. There's also some areas in Austin's greenbelts that are apparently decent. I think these areas are limestone.

HCR gets my +1 vote, though as I have actually been there. HCR, Sam's throne for trad, and Cave Creek (mixed/sport/trad) are all worth visiting and is within a 30 mile area. That area has quality sandstone.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Around Austin, you've got McKinney Falls, which has a lot of steep limestone bouldering, and Rogers park, also limestone, which is bigger and a bit farther from the city. If you're willing to drive 18 hours, you can get most anywhere, from HP40 in Alabama for slopers and bouldering to Indian Creek in Moab for desert splitters.

Phosphene
Aug 11, 2008
I'M NOT TRYING TO GET BIG AND BULKY OKAY WE ALL FAIL DIFFERENT GOALS

Evolv, La Sportiva, ClimbX and some Scarpa shoes on sale at TheClymb. Plus a bunch of harnesses and quickdraw sets. Some of the stuff is like half off including shoes. I just ordered me some scarpa vapors
Here's an invite link https://www.theclymb.com/invite-from/redstringdrummer
Also a ton of hiking, camping and cycling stuff on sale.

Advice for shoes, try them on somewhere in person before you order them. I mean you can always order a few and send the ones that don't fit back but this will save time. Plus almost no two brands cut shoes the same way. I on the other hand did not follow this advice because i couldn't find a scarpa dealer near by. So i hope my shoes fit when they get here.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Lately I've been climbing again. During climbing everything seems fine, but the past weekend after a long session the big toe on my right foot got to the point where walking hurt sometimes and running was almost not an option. It mostly feels pain when I stress it (eg standing tip-toes, jumping, trying to quickly change directions), as it doesn't hurt when I simply run it through a full range of motions.

Is this a common climbing injury? I'm wondering if it's an injured ligament in the big toe or something like that, maybe from last summer when I'd climb a LOT (maybe I over-stressed it during a climb sometime, or if my shoes are too tight on the toe).

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



Pander posted:

Lately I've been climbing again. During climbing everything seems fine, but the past weekend after a long session the big toe on my right foot got to the point where walking hurt sometimes and running was almost not an option. It mostly feels pain when I stress it (eg standing tip-toes, jumping, trying to quickly change directions), as it doesn't hurt when I simply run it through a full range of motions.

Is this a common climbing injury? I'm wondering if it's an injured ligament in the big toe or something like that, maybe from last summer when I'd climb a LOT (maybe I over-stressed it during a climb sometime, or if my shoes are too tight on the toe).

How tight are your shoes? Mostly climbing shoes prevent injury, as you're so crammed up and supported by the rubber it's impossible to pull something. I guess I could see shoes so tight they actually hurt something by forcing the toes into a ball where using them would roll the toe into a ball, but I would think that would make climbing extremely painful.

It's a weird injury.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Pander posted:

Is this a common climbing injury? I'm wondering if it's an injured ligament in the big toe or something like that, maybe from last summer when I'd climb a LOT (maybe I over-stressed it during a climb sometime, or if my shoes are too tight on the toe).

I have something like this, I have to wear very stiff climbing shoes (basically a board under my foot) or else my right big toe hurts a lot. I can feel it sometimes in normal shoes if I put a lot of force on the toe, but it mostly doesn't bother me outside climbing. The injury came from jiu-jitsu, I was thrown off someone and basically landed on my big toe curled under me, and must have pulled something, but the x-ray said it wasn't broken.

Also who knows what brand this glove is? I bought the pair in Germany, we weren't able to do the via-ferrata I was going to use them on because the gondola was closed due to snow, and I lost the left before I got back to the US. So I never actually used the gloves, but they seem amazing...

JustAnother Fat Guy
Dec 22, 2009

Go to hell, and take your cheap suit with you!

That's a mountain equipment glove. I quite like their stuff, I put them up there with Arc'teryx as the best outdoorswear stuff. Have used their stuff extensively on hikes, climbs in the alps and climbs in the high Himalayas.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

That's a mountain equipment glove. I quite like their stuff, I put them up there with Arc'teryx as the best outdoorswear stuff. Have used their stuff extensively on hikes, climbs in the alps and climbs in the high Himalayas.

Thanks. I found their website and the exact glove model, maybe I'll look for a us distributor.

miseerin
Apr 4, 2008

"You obviously don't know what 'boarding party' means."

I'm never getting married again. Next Tuesday I'm picking my old boulder schedule back up after going on a hiatus since June. Unfortunately, my only pair of shoes (Elektras) got a ton of gross water damage when my car door was leaking water every time it rained, and I didn't notice they were lying in the puddle for weeks. They were so slimy and stinky, I just threw them out. Same with my brand new (and full) chalk bag.

I just bought a new pair yesterday, and they should be coming in on Friday. I wanted to stick to Evolvs for now, as they were really dependable, but I upgraded to Shaman LV's. I'm so psyched for them to come in!



I left off at a V2-3, so I'm hoping by the summer I can level up at least one.

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spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



It has been super nice in Denver today and the forecast looks really good. I am considering trying to get out on some ropes (been 3 months since I last climbed). The ski season has been pretty meh...I need something at this point.

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