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myownsavior
Dec 21, 2004

I operate a nuclear reactor.

My university gym is finally opening back up again!! It's been closed the last few months due to a climber decking on lead (supposedly due to a horrid belay but I don't know the full story, just hearsay). Watching Dosage 4 to get pumped.

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Grisly Grotto
Jun 17, 2003

Are sure you should fight tonight? You don't look well.


Does anyone else have problems with their knees? I've been climbing for a few months now, making steady progress, but my knees are giving me constant trouble. They're really getting quite sore. At least once a session, often more I nail a knee into a hold, a wall, or something. They're covered in bruises. It was kinda funny at first but it's been bumming me out a little. Am I just unco or is this fairly common?

MiamiKid
Dec 14, 2003


myownsavior posted:

My university gym is finally opening back up again!! It's been closed the last few months due to a climber decking on lead (supposedly due to a horrid belay but I don't know the full story, just hearsay). Watching Dosage 4 to get pumped.

Was this at U of Iowa? They must be sorting out the liability issues still. This incident had an effect on the wall at my local university, where they started clamping down on some safety protocols and wondering if lead climbing was a good idea. Seems quite obvious that this incident in Iowa was something far outside safe climbing practices.. (http://www.iowacityowl.com/posts/613-Accident-on-Iowa-City-Rock-Climbing-Wall for those that haven't seen it.)

After this Iowa incident, one way they were strongly enforcing the rules at my wall was to make sure all belayers were anchoring to the floor. Something I find unnecessary since my climbing partners are of similar weight, we're typically top roping through belay bars, limits the belayers movement, and so on. One student employee thought this was so important, that while a person was climbing, she noted that the belayer had failed to anchor. With a person 30 feet in the air, the employee unscrewed the locking biner on the belayer, passed the anchor sling into the 'biner, and re-locked the biner.

And thought that process somehow made the climber safer, rather than simply correcting the belayer when the climber returned to the ground.

Anyway, I'd be interested to know if you find out any more details regarding the incident at Iowa (if that's where you're from.)

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.


Grisly Grotto posted:

Does anyone else have problems with their knees? I've been climbing for a few months now, making steady progress, but my knees are giving me constant trouble. They're really getting quite sore. At least once a session, often more I nail a knee into a hold, a wall, or something. They're covered in bruises. It was kinda funny at first but it's been bumming me out a little. Am I just unco or is this fairly common?


If you are climbing with control and purpose, you should not be banging into things. If you are making lots of dynamic or jerky moves on every climb, then you might occasionally bang into something. Periodically you find climbs at gyms where someone set a second route after the first was put up, and the second route has holds that are just outright in the way. That should be the exception though, so if you are banging your knees on every climb I don't think that is the problem.

I would make a point to try climbing with "silent feet" for a while. Basically when you climb, make all of your foot moves such that you don't make any noise on the wall. If you hear your feet stomping on holds or banging the wall as you climb, try the route again. If you have only been climbing for a few months, you may be pushing into grades that are too hard for you climb yet with good form.

Edit: added quote for context

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



Grisly Grotto posted:

Does anyone else have problems with their knees? I've been climbing for a few months now, making steady progress, but my knees are giving me constant trouble. They're really getting quite sore. At least once a session, often more I nail a knee into a hold, a wall, or something. They're covered in bruises. It was kinda funny at first but it's been bumming me out a little. Am I just unco or is this fairly common?

You might want to try focusing on your entire body movement when you make a move. I know when I make big moves, sometimes I'm over pumped and forget to really think about the path my entire body is going to take when I lunge for that extra reach. If you've only been climbing for a few months, that sounds pretty normal. A lot of newer climbers kind of have "tunnel vision" when they are setting up for the next hold -- usually the knees and elbows suffer from this.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



MiamiKid posted:

After this Iowa incident, one way they were strongly enforcing the rules at my wall was to make sure all belayers were anchoring to the floor. Something I find unnecessary since my climbing partners are of similar weight, we're typically top roping through belay bars, limits the belayers movement, and so on. One student employee thought this was so important, that while a person was climbing, she noted that the belayer had failed to anchor. With a person 30 feet in the air, the employee unscrewed the locking biner on the belayer, passed the anchor sling into the 'biner, and re-locked the biner.

Christ that's horrifying.

myownsavior
Dec 21, 2004

I operate a nuclear reactor.

MiamiKid posted:

Was this at U of Iowa? They must be sorting out the liability issues still. This incident had an effect on the wall at my local university, where they started clamping down on some safety protocols and wondering if lead climbing was a good idea. Seems quite obvious that this incident in Iowa was something far outside safe climbing practices.. (http://www.iowacityowl.com/posts/613-Accident-on-Iowa-City-Rock-Climbing-Wall for those that haven't seen it.)

After this Iowa incident, one way they were strongly enforcing the rules at my wall was to make sure all belayers were anchoring to the floor. Something I find unnecessary since my climbing partners are of similar weight, we're typically top roping through belay bars, limits the belayers movement, and so on. One student employee thought this was so important, that while a person was climbing, she noted that the belayer had failed to anchor. With a person 30 feet in the air, the employee unscrewed the locking biner on the belayer, passed the anchor sling into the 'biner, and re-locked the biner.

And thought that process somehow made the climber safer, rather than simply correcting the belayer when the climber returned to the ground.

Anyway, I'd be interested to know if you find out any more details regarding the incident at Iowa (if that's where you're from.)

Yeah this was at Iowa, and I think you're right about liability issues. I was concerned for a while that the wall would never re-open, thankfully that's not the case. We're going to have some new safety protocols here as well, no word on what specifically though. Part of the problem with the university gym is that not all employees are climbers necessarily, they've just been taught the rules on paper and don't actually know anything about the equipment / how things work, leading to situations like you just described with the anchor...

Anyway, I've heard two different things about the fall at Iowa. First was that the belayer was using some sort of autolocking belay device, but was blocking the camming unit, and not holding the brake end of the rope - the climber fell, the belayer didn't react in time, etc. Second was that the climber was resting after clipping into a draw, so the belayer tried to tie some sort of blocking knot into the brake end of the rope, but did so improperly WHILE blocking the camming unit on the belay device.

Either cases are totally egregious and there's no way that belayer should've been belay certified, much less lead belay certified. I'm sure they'll be more careful these days.

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I have some pretty awful pain at the top of my wrist whenever I release most jug holds with my right hand. The pain comes and gos pretty quickly but is a real bitch to deal with when I boulder. Any ideas?

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



myownsavior posted:


Either cases are totally egregious and there's no way that belayer should've been belay certified, much less lead belay certified. I'm sure they'll be more careful these days.

I think it is more about people just don't care to learn or care about another persons life. We have all seen completely dangerous and stupid things done out climbing. People don't care, if you say something they get defensive, etc.

It basically comes down to the belayer cared more about himself than his friend. You got to be careful with who you trust.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Fontoyn posted:

I have some pretty awful pain at the top of my wrist whenever I release most jug holds with my right hand. The pain comes and gos pretty quickly but is a real bitch to deal with when I boulder. Any ideas?

Sounds like carpal tunnel.

triad
Jan 6, 2007

YOU KNEADED SOMEONE TO BLAME, SO YOU CRUST IT ON ME


Question for all you boulder-ers out there.

I've been plateauing pretty hard for the past 3 months at V5/6s, and I just can't seem to get past it. I've managed a few V5s one V6 before I had to take a couple weeks off for work. Coming back I found that I was struggling with V5s, and even some 4s, and I really haven't been able to move past it.

I hit a similar slump around V3 a year back, but that was mostly a strength issue and I was able to just power through it by incorporating a pullup board routine at the end of each climb, just to make sure I was working out all the right muscle groups. I haven't been able to find the solution this time, though. I feel like a lot of the problem is just learning how to shift my weight around so I don't wreck my fingers with each movement, but I have no idea what sort of routine I can get into to help me with that. I find myself having to make far more dynamic movements than other people on the wall, and I just tire myself out halfway through a tough problem.

Does anyone have any good techniques or work outs that worked for them that I might be able to use to get over this hump? Any advice appreciated!

VVVVVV I'll give that a try, thanks!

triad fucked around with this message at 22:03 on Jan 18, 2013

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


With the time off you probably just lost some strength and that's why you aren't climbing as hard. To get better though start thinking more about what each movement will do to your body position, how your body is going to want to swing and figure out how to control that swing. Climb easier routes slowly and in control, making each move as smooth as you can. Watch videos of climbers and the good climbers at your gym, and deconstruct how they move and why. Don't just watch and try to do the same thing, watch and think about why the did it the way they did. A good drill is to climb easy stuff doing "isolaters" as I call them. Only move your hips+torso when all 4 points are on the wall, and keep your hips+torso still when moving any limb. You can still twist your hips some when moving your feet, but don't change their location. Try to keep pivoting of feet and regripping holds to a minimum as well when moving your body. Isolaters always help me with deconstructing climbing movements and make them feel more natural and in control when climbing regularly. They also make you strong.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Some advice I got recently was to do with the trailing foot when making a tough move, most people (including good climbers I know) drag their trailing foot up the wall for stability when moving up. If you watch professional boulderers you'll see that the trailing foot is stuck out so it doesn't have a chance to get caught on anything and isn't pulling against the wall. The way to practice this is to do traverses, falling onto holds and holding the barn door on every move, this apparently gets your body used to keep the foot out and activating the obliques for balance instead of the second foot. It's something I'm trying now (particularly for a couple of slab routes that have ridiculous no handed step ups to off balance crimps which are kicking my rear end).

That all said I'm in the same position as you, I'm considering buying the how to climb 3 grades harder book, it's been recommended by a couple of people to me now, and apparently even though the website looks like a scam site, it isn't and the book is pretty comprehensive.

http://www.howtoclimbthreegradesharder.com/

Irving
Jun 21, 2003


myownsavior posted:

My university gym is finally opening back up again!! It's been closed the last few months due to a climber decking on lead (supposedly due to a horrid belay but I don't know the full story, just hearsay). Watching Dosage 4 to get pumped.

I don't know why it keeps happening at my gym, but we've had two people in the last few months fall from the top of the auto-belay because they haven't clipped in properly. At least one of them was an incredibly experienced climber who came in pretty much every day. It seems like the most common injuries are:

1) Beginners falling off the bouldering wall onto their locked off arms and dislocating shoulders.
2) Experienced climbers falling from the tippy top of a climb because they didn't clip into the auto-belay.
3) Experienced climbers falling because their belayer (and girlfriend) completely messed up threading a cinch (okay, this one only happened once)

I've never seen any injuries on lead. To be fair, the floor is soft enough and the clips close together enough that you could deck from the first or second clip and it wouldn't be much worse than falling in the bouldering area, but it still weirds me out that the most bad injuries we've seen have been from the frigging auto belay.

Phosphene
Aug 11, 2008
I'M NOT TRYING TO GET BIG AND BULKY OKAY WE ALL FAIL DIFFERENT GOALS


New shoes from TheClymb(ignore the mess from dinner). And thank christ they fit. They got here before my school books did. So that's exciting. Can't study, no book. Might as well climb.

On the subject of auto belays,I will not climb on one no matter how many times i've checked myself. I can't yell at that thing to TAKE when i'm tired or unsure about my move. They just frighten me.

pbpancho
Feb 17, 2004
-=International Sales=-

B3dl4m posted:


On the subject of auto belays,I will not climb on one no matter how many times i've checked myself. I can't yell at that thing to TAKE when i'm tired or unsure about my move. They just frighten me.

I'm the opposite, I like that I don't have the crutch of taking to rest so I have to send the route in one go, and the ones at my gyms (Vertical Endeavors) work in a way that if you fall on a sketchy move, you are just slowly lowered to the ground. I don't use them all the time but they are lifesavers for when I just want to run laps or practice a little early in the morning.

EDIT: Also, our autobelays have alarms that sound if you go more than 8ft up or so and are not clipped in.

On a different note, got to ice climb for the second time today! The Minnesota Climbers Association partnered with a local town the last few years to get permission to install an ice farming system in an old quarry (there is some natural flow here but the farming makes it a really great spot. They also have a bunch of bolted rock climbs here, and most of the flows have bolts at the top for easy anchors too, so it's a really great place to learn ice climbing.

Warming up on the "bunny hill"


Rapping down the "bunny hill" after cleaning or anchor


On to the real deal!


The guys that run the farming have also been experimenting with LEDs embedded in the ice. Here are some results so far:

pbpancho fucked around with this message at 04:41 on Jan 20, 2013

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

triad posted:

Question for all you boulder-ers out there.

I've been plateauing pretty hard for the past 3 months at V5/6s, and I just can't seem to get past it. I've managed a few V5s one V6 before I had to take a couple weeks off for work. Coming back I found that I was struggling with V5s, and even some 4s, and I really haven't been able to move past it.

I hit a similar slump around V3 a year back, but that was mostly a strength issue and I was able to just power through it by incorporating a pullup board routine at the end of each climb, just to make sure I was working out all the right muscle groups. I haven't been able to find the solution this time, though. I feel like a lot of the problem is just learning how to shift my weight around so I don't wreck my fingers with each movement, but I have no idea what sort of routine I can get into to help me with that. I find myself having to make far more dynamic movements than other people on the wall, and I just tire myself out halfway through a tough problem.

Does anyone have any good techniques or work outs that worked for them that I might be able to use to get over this hump? Any advice appreciated!

VVVVVV I'll give that a try, thanks!

This article was in a climbing magazine at my gym. To me it sounds like a recipe for injury and a way to turn climbing into the fitness routine monotony from which it is intended to be my escape, but it does have very detailed weekly and monthly routines and I'm sure if you completed the year you would come out a much better climber:
http://www.climbing.com/skill/your-goal-boulder-harder/

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Irving posted:

... it still weirds me out that the most bad injuries we've seen have been from the frigging auto belay.

A lot of safety is gained from the pre-climb cross check that happens between climber and belayer. The auto-belay may work just fine, but without someone to keep you honest even an experienced climber can make a mistake hooking into it. We have a few in my gym, and I tend not to use them because the routes on them are a lot easier than I typically climb. I trust them just fine though, and when I do use them I double (and triple) check myself before I climb. It actually doesn't surprise me very much that the auto belay would result in accidents from improper use.

benwards
Apr 9, 2007

Another youthful indiscretion


I finally blew out the toe on my Boreal Jesters, and it's time for a new pair of shoes. I have wide feet with high arches, do you guys have any recommendations for a shoe that won't crush my feet laterally? I climb mostly indoors, 5.10 up to weaksauce 5.12, V3/4. Some outdoor sport climbing from time to time. Mostly flat wall and slab, I'm not a big fan of overhang and don't do a ton of it. Help!

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


benwards posted:

I finally blew out the toe on my Boreal Jesters, and it's time for a new pair of shoes. I have wide feet with high arches, do you guys have any recommendations for a shoe that won't crush my feet laterally? I climb mostly indoors, 5.10 up to weaksauce 5.12, V3/4. Some outdoor sport climbing from time to time. Mostly flat wall and slab, I'm not a big fan of overhang and don't do a ton of it. Help!

I have similar feet to you and so far I've been good with 5.10 Anasazi VCS, they lasted ages and had a really strong heel.

I had a pair of evolv bandits but they were excruciating to break into, once they did though I don't think I've had a better performing mid range shoe.

Currently using 5.10 Coyotes because they are super comfortable and perform fine, edging and heel hooking on them are both great considering the comfort and they aren't too expensive either.

In terms of the grades I climb at, I'm currently around the V5/6 level (not that it means much but I've not climbed harder than that anywhere).

McFoxigator
Jun 13, 2011

Life is full of twicky decisions...


I seem to have developed some moderate CTS from climbing. Anyone have any ideas for some ways to fix that and prevent it in the future?

benwards
Apr 9, 2007

Another youthful indiscretion


Stangg posted:

I have similar feet to you and so far I've been good with 5.10 Anasazi VCS, they lasted ages and had a really strong heel.

I had a pair of evolv bandits but they were excruciating to break into, once they did though I don't think I've had a better performing mid range shoe.

Currently using 5.10 Coyotes because they are super comfortable and perform fine, edging and heel hooking on them are both great considering the comfort and they aren't too expensive either.

In terms of the grades I climb at, I'm currently around the V5/6 level (not that it means much but I've not climbed harder than that anywhere).

Awesome, I'll check out the Anasazi and the Coyotes. I've heard that 5.10 is good for wider feet in general, good to have confirmation.

spandexcajun
Feb 28, 2005

Suck the head for a little extra cajun flavor

Fallen Rib

pbpancho posted:

I'm the opposite, I like that I don't have the crutch of taking to rest so I have to send the route in one go, and the ones at my gyms (Vertical Endeavors) work in a way that if you fall on a sketchy move, you are just slowly lowered to the ground. I don't use them all the time but they are lifesavers for when I just want to run laps or practice a little early in the morning.

EDIT: Also, our autobelays have alarms that sound if you go more than 8ft up or so and are not clipped in.

On a different note, got to ice climb for the second time today! The Minnesota Climbers Association partnered with a local town the last few years to get permission to install an ice farming system in an old quarry (there is some natural flow here but the farming makes it a really great spot. They also have a bunch of bolted rock climbs here, and most of the flows have bolts at the top for easy anchors too, so it's a really great place to learn ice climbing.

Warming up on the "bunny hill"


Rapping down the "bunny hill" after cleaning or anchor


On to the real deal!


The guys that run the farming have also been experimenting with LEDs embedded in the ice. Here are some results so far:


Awesome pics! I would love to get more into ice but it is pretty intimidating. I have been 3 - 4 times top roping with the Colordao Mt Club. I have been looking for some tools on craigslist. I have pretty much everything else I need. I think I would feel good setting up topropes on ice, I have set up a few v-threads for practice and trees are abound. I know a few places in Colorado to try to go, but most ice climbers here are secretive, not enough ice to go around and all that. Leading on ice.... that will have to wait a few years or forever. I started leading trad last summer and it's more then enough to get the old heart going. Leading ice, talk about nerves!

pbpancho
Feb 17, 2004
-=International Sales=-

spandexcajun posted:

Awesome pics! I would love to get more into ice but it is pretty intimidating. I have been 3 - 4 times top roping with the Colordao Mt Club. I have been looking for some tools on craigslist. I have pretty much everything else I need. I think I would feel good setting up topropes on ice, I have set up a few v-threads for practice and trees are abound. I know a few places in Colorado to try to go, but most ice climbers here are secretive, not enough ice to go around and all that. Leading on ice.... that will have to wait a few years or forever. I started leading trad last summer and it's more then enough to get the old heart going. Leading ice, talk about nerves!

Yeah, there's no loving way I'll be leading anytime soon. Luckily we have Sandstone Ice Park (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sandstone-Ice-Park/318485004840616) about an hour and a half north, and it's very convenient with bolted anchors you can set a toprope from for 90% of the climbs there and it's all piped up to farm ice so as long as it's cold we can climb(there's another part of the park with a bunch of sport lead climbs for the warmer months too). There's also some short stuff in the Twin Cities themselves, and plenty more up on Superior.

Slim Killington
Nov 16, 2007

I SAID GOOD DAY SIR


Hey fellow climbing goons!

If you're in the Chicago area (like me) and haven't yet heard about it, First Ascent Climbing is opening in Chicago this fall. Looks like it's going to be a really nice place, and it'll be cool to have a gym around that's closer than VE and Boulders.

http://www.firstascentclimbing.com/

I'm sure most of you already know about it, but it's not on any of the maps here or "find a gym" links so I thought I'd share.

Niyqor
Dec 1, 2003

Paid for by the meat council of America

Slim Killington posted:

Hey fellow climbing goons!

If you're in the Chicago area (like me) and haven't yet heard about it, First Ascent Climbing is opening in Chicago this fall. Looks like it's going to be a really nice place, and it'll be cool to have a gym around that's closer than VE and Boulders.

http://www.firstascentclimbing.com/

I'm sure most of you already know about it, but it's not on any of the maps here or "find a gym" links so I thought I'd share.

Awesome. Thanks for the heads up. Know any more details about expected opening or address?

Slim Killington
Nov 16, 2007

I SAID GOOD DAY SIR


There seems to be almost no news whatsoever yet, other than fall '13 and South Loop. The site advertises skyline views though, so I'd expect it to be in the upper floors of somewhere.

FiestaDePantalones
May 13, 2005

Kicked in the pants by TFLC

Is there some kind of grading system that gyms use for bouldering? I'm completely confused by what I'm seeing at the gym I went to, and don't speak the same language as the locals, so I wasn't even really able to ask what was going on.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


FiestaDePantalones posted:

Is there some kind of grading system that gyms use for bouldering? I'm completely confused by what I'm seeing at the gym I went to, and don't speak the same language as the locals, so I wasn't even really able to ask what was going on.

There is no widespread gym specific system that I know of. In the US gyms generally use V grades, just like for outdoor boulders. In Europe I suspect they use whatever they call the 6a style of grading often. But it's not uncommon for a gym to make up their own grading system for Bouldering, and it is a lot more common than for roped climbs. In Boulder the Spot uses a system of dots from 1-5... I think everything V7 and harder is graded as 5+. I've seen places that just do "easy, medium, hard" as the entire spectrum. Generally if you can see some number or letter or symbol, bigger or more = harder.

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



FiestaDePantalones posted:

Is there some kind of grading system that gyms use for bouldering? I'm completely confused by what I'm seeing at the gym I went to, and don't speak the same language as the locals, so I wasn't even really able to ask what was going on.

Maybe if you told us where you were it would be easier to figure out which regional system you were looking at.

FiestaDePantalones
May 13, 2005

Kicked in the pants by TFLC

Yeah, that makes sense. I'm in Milan, Italy. If any of you guys are around here, I could desperately use a climbing partner who I at least somewhat understand..

Cybor Tap
Jul 13, 2001



Who's going to Banff this year? My school is showing 3 nights in a row. It looks so awesome!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEC4TKfBGhc

Scenty
Feb 8, 2008




I've been reading this thread because one of my goals is to try rock climbing. It looks soooo much fun to me! I hate treadmill type exercise but really enjoy things like this.

The problem is my weight. I found the gym in my area, and on their website they don't have info about weight limits. I am currently around 270, I have a log in TFLC. I am working with a registered dietician and doing starting strength. From general information I have read online, the weight limit is typically around 250. Does this sound right? Have you guys (and ladies) seen heavy people at your rock climbing gyms? It's something I really want to do but I am afraid I will stick out like a sore thumb, even once I reach 245 or so and I am able to go.

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



Scenty posted:

I've been reading this thread because one of my goals is to try rock climbing. It looks soooo much fun to me! I hate treadmill type exercise but really enjoy things like this.

The problem is my weight. I found the gym in my area, and on their website they don't have info about weight limits. I am currently around 270, I have a log in TFLC. I am working with a registered dietician and doing starting strength. From general information I have read online, the weight limit is typically around 250. Does this sound right? Have you guys (and ladies) seen heavy people at your rock climbing gyms? It's something I really want to do but I am afraid I will stick out like a sore thumb, even once I reach 245 or so and I am able to go.

The heavier you are obviously the harder it is going to be to pull yourself up the wall, but a couple of my friends at the gym range between 200-240. It's definitely going to be harder for you than someone who is similarly un-athletic but lighter. I think you're asking about weight limits as far as safety equipment goes though, and you should be fine. The ropes, harnesses and biners are meant to take forces much more intense than a big guy putting a little tension on the rope in a top-rope "fall". Don't worry about "sticking out", everybody sucks and feels awkward about it when they start.

Are you going with somebody or alone?

Z3n
Jul 21, 2007

I think the point is Z3n is a space cowboy on the edge of a frontier unknown to man, he's out there pushing the limits, trail braking into the abyss. Finding out where the edge of the razor is, turning to face the darkness and revving his 690 into it's vast gaze. You gotta live this to learn it bro.


There was a girl at around the 250 pound range at my gym and she climbed 5.11-12 and made it look easy. If you want to do it, go for it!

Scenty
Feb 8, 2008




Covert Ops Wizard posted:

The heavier you are obviously the harder it is going to be to pull yourself up the wall, but a couple of my friends at the gym range between 200-240. It's definitely going to be harder for you than someone who is similarly un-athletic but lighter. I think you're asking about weight limits as far as safety equipment goes though, and you should be fine. The ropes, harnesses and biners are meant to take forces much more intense than a big guy putting a little tension on the rope in a top-rope "fall". Don't worry about "sticking out", everybody sucks and feels awkward about it when they start.

Are you going with somebody or alone?


Z3n posted:

There was a girl at around the 250 pound range at my gym and she climbed 5.11-12 and made it look easy. If you want to do it, go for it!

Thanks! I emailed the gym and they got back to me surprisingly fast. They said they have auto-belays rated at 350 lbs and the person who responded said they have personally belayed somebody who was 320 lbs. They said if the person belaying you is more than 75 lbs lighter they will need an anchor plate, which they do have.

My fiance would be going with me. I'll talk to him about signing up for the beginner class, which includes a month pass and equipment.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


My local gym here in San Luis Obispo ( slo-op not the crux) is having a ccs comp march 2. It is also open to the public! We are one of the few if not the first and only non profit climbing gym. Would be awesome to get some goons who crush and even those who don't crush so much, to come down!

semicolonsrock
Aug 26, 2009

chugga chugga chugga

So I can't climb again until awhile after the knee surgery I'm getting soon. Any suggestions for good work outs so I can get back into bouldering without losing literally all of my strength? I've been doing lots of pull ups, but I'm sure there's a lot more I could be doing.

ante
Apr 9, 2005

SUNSHINE AND RAINBOWS

I'm in Thailand right now with no equipment. Where should I go climbing

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Feka
Jan 21, 2013

No soup for you!


semicolonsrock posted:

So I can't climb again until awhile after the knee surgery I'm getting soon. Any suggestions for good work outs so I can get back into bouldering without losing literally all of my strength? I've been doing lots of pull ups, but I'm sure there's a lot more I could be doing.

I had knee surgery a few years back (ligament). Doing work out for your upper body is good so you won't lose a lot of strength there, but you really want to take special care of that injured knee and build up strength there too, since it will be weak after the surgery. Putting preasure on it will be difficult for a while and that will probably cause problems when you boulder.

A quick google gave me this handout:

http://www2.massgeneral.org/sports/protocols/strength%20training%20for%20the%20knee.pdf

It includes a lot of the exercises I did after my surgery and should be quite helpfull.

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