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Parappa the Dapper
Jul 2, 2003

...and then my toast came out soft.


asur posted:

The number of easy and moderate sport climbs in Yosemite is pretty low so unless you climb hard or something has drastically changed you may be better off going outside the park. Table Mountain has a lot of sport climbing.

Mountain Project thread: https://www.mountainproject.com/forum/topic/112293441/1st-trip-to-yosemite-whats-the-best-sport-climbing-area-in-yosemite

Excellent. Thank you!

Snipe edit: dynos are cool and good.

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tildes
Nov 15, 2018


Any Manhattan gyms for bouldering yall would recommend? Ideally south of Central Park just given the rest of the schedule, but if theres somewhere great elsewhere Im interested!

Xyven
Jun 4, 2005

Check to induce a ban



tildes posted:

Any Manhattan gyms for bouldering y’all would recommend? Ideally south of Central Park just given the rest of the schedule, but if there’s somewhere great elsewhere I’m interested!

I think Central Rock Gym is considered the best in Manhattan, but if you're willing to take the subway to Brooklyn Vital is large and usually has good setting.

tildes
Nov 15, 2018


Ty for the Vital recommendation! The roof view was a pretty amazing background for climbing.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



Have any of you guys met up with randoms off Mountain Project, or whatever site, to climb with? I'd be really nice to have a spotter / someone who knows the area while in Joe's Valley this weekend. But I'm a little sketched out by it too :thunk:

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Sab669 posted:

Have any of you guys met up with randoms off Mountain Project, or whatever site, to climb with? I'd be really nice to have a spotter / someone who knows the area while in Joe's Valley this weekend. But I'm a little sketched out by it too :thunk:

There's two types of people that need partners - People who want to climb when they don't have someone to climb with, and people who are sketchy as gently caress so no one will climb with them. Sadly there's not a great way to know which is which ahead of time from my experience.

Slimy Hog
Apr 22, 2008





Sab669 posted:

Have any of you guys met up with randoms off Mountain Project, or whatever site, to climb with? I'd be really nice to have a spotter / someone who knows the area while in Joe's Valley this weekend. But I'm a little sketched out by it too :thunk:

My regular climbing partners consist of people I've met:

1. Posting on mountain project
2. a gym class
3. a class I booked with a guide
4. Through one of the above people

I've also climbed with a handful of random people I've met through a professional discord I'm part of.

Before taking a whipper with anyone, I try to take some smaller falls in a more controlled environment (the gym) to see how they catch me, then I tend to take a big whipper inside and that decides how comfortable I am with them belaying me on the regular.

I also talk to people about safety before I start climbing with them and see their attitude about partner safety checks before deciding how hard to climb with them.

There's only 1 person that I've met that I don't want to climb with again and that has nothing to do with safety, I just don't like the guy.

This is all rope climbing but I hope some of it was helpful for your situation...

BlancoNino
Apr 26, 2010


Hahaha, a (very trusting) climbing buddy of mine told me a story about climbing with some knucklehead. Knucklehead was belaying some trad route and told him that his percocet was kicking in and to keep that in mind. They didn't climb together again.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



I'd only be bouldering, but still a lovely spotter can be a bad situation.

I just remembered reading about some group of climbers who had a bunch of gear stolen a year or two ago -- although when I tried to look it up just now, the article had been updated to say the story was actually just a complete fabrication from an internet troll.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Sab669 posted:

I'd only be bouldering, but still a lovely spotter can be a bad situation.

I just remembered reading about some group of climbers who had a bunch of gear stolen a year or two ago -- although when I tried to look it up just now, the article had been updated to say the story was actually just a complete fabrication from an internet troll.

Eh, I would boulder with randos from Mountain Project. I thought we were talking about ropes.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



I should've clarified, but Joe's is pretty much exclusively bouldering from what MP lists

Ubiquitus
Nov 20, 2011



I would check Facebook climbing groups first. Also I think Joes is gonna be incredibly hot right now?

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



Pretty toasty this week, but currently looks like it should cool down Friday/Saturday, which is when I'll be there :toot:

KingColliwog
May 15, 2003

Let's go droogs

armorer posted:

Eh, I would boulder with randos from Mountain Project. I thought we were talking about ropes.

Yeah really, the shittiest spotter is fine if you have enough pads and it's not a particularly dangerous boulder with horrible landing. Sure a good spotter makes a difference, but I never really rely on them for safety. You'll be fine with randos! The extra pads will make up for their lovely spotting

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009






No real pictures of me climbing but this was a fantastic trip. What a beautiful area.

The Angler -- that boulder down in the river -- is only a V2 but the starting foot chip is so obscenely polished that it would be like a V6 in my gym. I only managed to hold the start 2 or 3 times and then fell off immediately while going for the first move; I know I could do the rest of it if I could just get started. Oh well. Still sent a few V3 and then I was close to getting another but chickened out because I only had 2 small pads and no spotter as no one replied to my MP / Reddit posts :v:

Wish I could have climbed longer but the coffee shop I rented pads from closes pretty early. I'm tempted to go back tomorrow but I lost a lot of skin climbing there, then again at a gym in SLC

Also it was nice to get a sense for what grades are like at a famous crag, rather than my little local place that no one's ever heard of

Sab669 fucked around with this message at 21:26 on May 22, 2022

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Awesome that you got out even if it was solo.

Ubiquitus
Nov 20, 2011



Sab669 posted:




No real pictures of me climbing but this was a fantastic trip. What a beautiful area.

The Angler -- that boulder down in the river -- is only a V2 but the starting foot chip is so obscenely polished that it would be like a V6 in my gym. I only managed to hold the start 2 or 3 times and then fell off immediately while going for the first move; I know I could do the rest of it if I could just get started. Oh well. Still sent a few V3 and then I was close to getting another but chickened out because I only had 2 small pads and no spotter as no one replied to my MP / Reddit posts :v:

Wish I could have climbed longer but the coffee shop I rented pads from closes pretty early. I'm tempted to go back tomorrow but I lost a lot of skin climbing there, then again at a gym in SLC

Also it was nice to get a sense for what grades are like at a famous crag, rather than my little local place that no one's ever heard of

Nice sounds like a dope trip! I felt like The angler is pretty sandbagged these days, Im sure at some point it was v2 or 3 but it definitely didnt feel like that to me. Were you starting a few moves in (not all the way to the right side of that face)?

Theres a six that starts all the way to the right climbing through the angler thats a slab masters dream, the angler is a few feet left of it

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009





Yea I guess I was skipping the absolute right most section a little bit. On MP I saw like an old weird mantle start to that problem I guess? Where I was starting there's that mega polished crescent foot chip and a good but absurdly sharp crimp rail kinda thing for the left hand.

Parappa the Dapper
Jul 2, 2003

...and then my toast came out soft.


We found a few sport routes in Yosemite and had a good ole time. The campsite next to us had some old school trad climbers that were fun to talk with. Their gear was 🤯

View from the anchors



Found the crag as we were departing the valley.

Anza Borrego
Feb 11, 2005

Ovis canadensis nelsoni

Parappa the Dapper posted:

The campsite next to us had some old school trad climbers that were fun to talk with. Their gear was 🤯

Was their gear super old?
Photos look great, Id very much like to climb the Valley some day.

Led a multipitch trad route in Idyllwild yesterday. Jensons Jaunt 5.6 and encountered my first offwidth in the wild. It wasnt THAT hard but the exposure and trying to REALLY having to figure out how to chicken wing made it spicier than I expected. I was following that pitch and was impressed that my partner was able to lead it without falling.

There was still some daylight left by the time we came down the friction route so I ended up leading p1 of The Long Climb 5.8, which is 40m of fist crack. My hands are pretty ripped up but I definitely leveled up on my crack technique. This was a trip of firsts for me: I took my first gear fall, from just a few feet above a BD #2, and bootied gear for the first time: a small ball nut, a brown tri-cam and some Trango runners.

We wanted to climb Fingertrip 5.7 but got a late start to the day and there was a lineup by the time we got there. Fortunately the rest of the crag wasnt too busy.

I had hit a bit of a lull in my training lately and this was definitely the shot in the arm I needed to get back into things. Id really like to lead all of The Long Climb but dont think I am there physically yet - one of the final pitches has a 5.9 roof that sounds scary - but its a good training goal to set.

Tahquitz


Start of The Long Climb. I think the hand crack (left of the two) is an alternate start? FA went up the offwidth, in 1936. Those guys had balls.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Anza Borrego posted:

Start of The Long Climb. I think the hand crack (left of the two) is an alternate start? FA went up the offwidth, in 1936. Those guys had balls.

Balls yes, nuts no

magicalmako
Feb 13, 2005


Anza Borrego posted:

Sick Trip Report!

Was the approach the worst thing ever?

Anza Borrego
Feb 11, 2005

Ovis canadensis nelsoni

magicalmako posted:

Was the approach the worst thing ever?

Its not that bad, about 45 minutes?
El Cajon Mountain in SD is WAY worse.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



A lot of fun watching Sunday's World Cup live, but I think I prefer watching the stream as you get an actual commentator to listen instead of too loud music and a hype guy who just says "YEA" and "NOOO" and prompts the crowd to cheer

Also it was 60 but sustained 30 mph winds and an overcast sky. The stage was decently well enclosed for the athletes' sake, but as a spectator sitting out in the grass it was so loving cold.

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m
Apr 16, 2017

Í̝̰ ͓̯̖̫̹̯̤A҉m̺̩͝ ͇̬A̡̮̞̠͚͉̱̫ K̶e͓ǵ.̻̱̪͖̹̟̕


bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m posted:

3) I strained something in my knee with a heel hook (super glad it didn't tear) somehow and my physiotherapist told me not to climb for at least a month :(

Lol yeah nevermind I'm not climbing this season basically, my knee is hosed and I randomly get intense stabbing pains in it when I do things like stand up, sit down, move around, and not move around

Instead I get to watch the world cup on my phone on a stationary bike

bvj191jgl7bBsqF5m
Apr 16, 2017

Í̝̰ ͓̯̖̫̹̯̤A҉m̺̩͝ ͇̬A̡̮̞̠͚͉̱̫ K̶e͓ǵ.̻̱̪͖̹̟̕


New edition of Squamish Bouldering is out finally though so I get to see pretty pictures of all the rocks I don't get to climb this year

bolind
Jun 19, 2005





Pillbug

I've taken my 4.5 year old bouldering three times in eight days, and we're both super stoked about it! :3: :yayclod:

I'm thinking to arrange a little company outing for my office mates where we go bouldering. What would be a good scoring system?

vonnegutt
Aug 7, 2006
Hobocamp.


bolind posted:

I've taken my 4.5 year old bouldering three times in eight days, and we're both super stoked about it! :3: :yayclod:

I'm thinking to arrange a little company outing for my office mates where we go bouldering. What would be a good scoring system?

My gym has a bouldering league with a points system. There were 3 tiers, basically v0 - v2, v3 - v5, v6+. I think it was something like 5, 10, 20 points by tier? Send was 1x points, flash was 2x points, zone (if you have those) was 0.5x points.

That might be too complicated but I definitely recommend having extra points for a flash. Having to do it first try makes it way more fun.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



My gym just does 1 point per V grade when they do their Boulder Bash competitions.

BlancoNino
Apr 26, 2010


If nobody in your office has been climbing before I would focus more on having a good time than getting "points." They'll only come back if they are having fun and competition is usually less so

tildes
Nov 15, 2018


In college they had a set list of problems from v1-13, and then each team tried to finish as many as they could, with the caveat that each person could only do one. I dont think this would work for beginners necessarily, but it was a fun way to have everyone be able to contribute something and try to push beyond whatever grade you were at.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Anyone here use torque nuts, or other hexes at all? I have a full rack (c4s doubled by totems, with c3s on the small end), so I don't need them at all, but I've been placing a lot more nuts recently and I feel like I'd get some use out of them, particularly on more alpine objectives. Also I've been leading more easy crack routes and I've seem a number of placements where I think they'd work nicely.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009



Climbed my first multipitch on Monday!!! Major goal of 2022 accomplished :peanut:

We did The Cave Route to the top of Brogan Spire at the Marsupials in Smith Rock.

It was scary as gently caress and probably not a great first multipitch! Or maybe it was, i dunno. It was easy climbing, but the 2nd pitch was just insanely run out, like from the anchor below, you walk along some flat ground first, which already adds like 10 ft of rope between you and the belayer at the anchors behind you, and then you still climb about 15-20 ft to the first bolt. Second bolt is probably another 20-30 ft above that. And then the anchors above are another 20 ft above that. Most of the climb is a very forward-pitched ramp (noted as 5.4 in the book) with plenty of features. But IMO the runout was not justified, as a fall would have been very bad - down to the sides of the ramp was not free space down to the ground, but a gully and a shelf that I could have easily decked on if I had taken a fall. Also the very last moves to get to the anchors at the top, with like 20 feet of runout below you, was getting off the ramp and over to a shelf above the gully, which felt incredibly sketch given the runout. A fall would have been bad bad bad.

Back to the beginning - my friend who has multipitched before led the first pitch, which was a fun and reasonably bolted 5.7. She went first so that I could go 2nd and belay up the 3rd (who only knows how to top-rope), so that she could confirm that I was top-belaying correctly before I went on to lead the 2nd pitch. It was a bit awkward because the anchors were on a big floor, but it worked out. Anyway pitch 1 was a good time.

Pitch 2 we switched up the order - me first, top-roper 2nd, experienced one 3rd. And like I said was scary as gently caress. The final move to the anchors was the worst part. Usually when I lead climb, if I get in my head, I coach myself through it, tell myself I got this, etc. This time my brain just like, turned off, and I just finished the climb and focused on my breathing, and then almost cried when I got my PAS into the anchors. I almost can't remember the climb. Spent a few minutes collecting myself before I set up anchor material and a belay for the 2nd. Wanted to just shout down to my friends just to like... say hi, tell them I was very scared but made it, but we couldn't hear each other that well. At least we could hear each other well enough that the usual short and familiar commands were clear. Oh and some dudes were rapping down from the spire above and they joined me at the anchors, they were super nice and gave me some pointers about how to set up my belay station a bit better, but also confirmed that I had things set up right.

Oh and also it was a long enough route that our 2nd was tied in with an apline butterfly and our 3rd sort of simulclimbed behind him, otherwise there would not have been enough rope (and there was no way to successfully toss the rope back down to the 3rd). BUT it wasn't really simulclimbing, the 3rd (the experienced multipitcher) just sort of walked along the shelf part and didn't have to begin truly climbing until the 2nd was up at the anchor with me.

The 3rd pitch to the top of the spire looked a little sketch to us, and anyway we were nearly there and on a ridge with an equally good view, and the nice dudes rapping down said it was alright up there but just as cool where we were, so we chose to just rap down from where we were.

Sorry for the sort of disjointed post, I'm still processing this climb and writing about it sort of helps. Our 3rd, the more experienced one, came up (on top-rope, remember) and said "HOLY poo poo I can't believe you led that, I was scared just top-roping it!" She's my usual climbing buddy and she said she will never let me get in my head about a lead again without reminding me of that lead. So it's something I should be proud of I guess. I had to go lead a (very fun!) single pitch 5.8 afterward just to put some climbing in between me and that scary 2nd pitch.

Multipitching was super fun, scary runout aside, and I really want to do another one that is uh... less sketch.

e: doing the math based on a 70m rope and the fact that the 3rd had to sort-of simulclimb, that puts the pitch at about 70 ft, with 2 bolts, so that confirms that the bolts were appx 20-30 ft apart and my memory isn't exaggerating it.

alnilam fucked around with this message at 18:36 on Jun 1, 2022

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

alnilam posted:

Climbed my first multipitch on Monday!!! Major goal of 2022 accomplished :peanut:

We did The Cave Route to the top of Brogan Spire at the Marsupials in Smith Rock.

It was scary as gently caress and probably not a great first multipitch! Or maybe it was, i dunno. It was easy climbing, but the 2nd pitch was just insanely run out, like from the anchor below, you walk along some flat ground first, which already adds like 10 ft of rope between you and the belayer at the anchors behind you, and then you still climb about 15-20 ft to the first bolt. Second bolt is probably another 20-30 ft above that. And then the anchors above are another 20 ft above that. Most of the climb is a very forward-pitched ramp (noted as 5.4 in the book) with plenty of features. But IMO the runout was not justified, as a fall would have been very bad - down to the sides of the ramp was not free space down to the ground, but a gully and a shelf that I could have easily decked on if I had taken a fall. Also the very last moves to get to the anchors at the top, with like 20 feet of runout below you, was getting off the ramp and over to a shelf above the gully, which felt incredibly sketch given the runout. A fall would have been bad bad bad.

Back to the beginning - my friend who has multipitched before led the first pitch, which was a fun and reasonably bolted 5.7. She went first so that I could go 2nd and belay up the 3rd (who only knows how to top-rope), so that she could confirm that I was top-belaying correctly before I went on to lead the 2nd pitch. It was a bit awkward because the anchors were on a big floor, but it worked out. Anyway pitch 1 was a good time.

Pitch 2 we switched up the order - me first, top-roper 2nd, experienced one 3rd. And like I said was scary as gently caress. The final move to the anchors was the worst part. Usually when I lead climb, if I get in my head, I coach myself through it, tell myself I got this, etc. This time my brain just like, turned off, and I just finished the climb and focused on my breathing, and then almost cried when I got my PAS into the anchors. I almost can't remember the climb. Spent a few minutes collecting myself before I set up anchor material and a belay for the 2nd. Wanted to just shout down to my friends just to like... say hi, tell them I was very scared but made it, but we couldn't hear each other that well. At least we could hear each other well enough that the usual short and familiar commands were clear. Oh and some dudes were rapping down from the spire above and they joined me at the anchors, they were super nice and gave me some pointers about how to set up my belay station a bit better, but also confirmed that I had things set up right.

Oh and also it was a long enough route that our 2nd was tied in with an apline butterfly and our 3rd sort of simulclimbed behind him, otherwise there would not have been enough rope (and there was no way to successfully toss the rope back down to the 3rd). BUT it wasn't really simulclimbing, the 3rd (the experienced multipitcher) just sort of walked along the shelf part and didn't have to begin truly climbing until the 2nd was up at the anchor with me.

The 3rd pitch to the top of the spire looked a little sketch to us, and anyway we were nearly there and on a ridge with an equally good view, and the nice dudes rapping down said it was alright up there but just as cool where we were, so we chose to just rap down from where we were.

Sorry for the sort of disjointed post, I'm still processing this climb and writing about it sort of helps. Our 3rd, the more experienced one, came up (on top-rope, remember) and said "HOLY poo poo I can't believe you led that, I was scared just top-roping it!" She's my usual climbing buddy and she said she will never let me get in my head about a lead again without reminding me of that lead. So it's something I should be proud of I guess. I had to go lead a (very fun!) single pitch 5.8 afterward just to put some climbing in between me and that scary 2nd pitch.

Multipitching was super fun, scary runout aside, and I really want to do another one that is uh... less sketch.

e: doing the math based on a 70m rope and the fact that the 3rd had to sort-of simulclimb, that puts the pitch at about 70 ft, with 2 bolts, so that confirms that the bolts were appx 20-30 ft apart and my memory isn't exaggerating it.

"Alan Watts" posted:

The Cave Route - 5.7, 4 stars. Mixed to 2 inches. The best route to the summit of Brogan Spire follows three memorable pitches starting with a vertical wall of good holds. Despite the quality, the long approach and unprotected crux pitch kept everyone away for decades. Today, with new bolts and the resurgence of Marsupial climbing, it's finally receiving long-overdue attention.

The book lists that as a mixed route, so yeah the expectation is that you clip the bolts in the blank sections but are otherwise protecting it with trad gear. Maybe it doesn't accept gear in that section? I don't know, since I haven't been on it yet. Nice work if you just went for it, but also please don't die. It's been on my list for a while actually, but I am typically too lazy to hike out to the marsupials!

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009



armorer posted:

The book lists that as a mixed route, so yeah the expectation is that you clip the bolts in the blank sections but are otherwise protecting it with trad gear. Maybe it doesn't accept gear in that section? I don't know, since I haven't been on it yet. Nice work if you just went for it, but also please don't die. It's been on my list for a while actually, but I am typically too lazy to hike out to the marsupials!

It's listed as mixed because of the 3rd pitch, which does actually have 2 bolts but the book says 2-inch gear. Also the more experienced of our group did in fact have some 2 inch gear ready for the 3rd pitch and we considered the bolts a bonus, but like I said we ended up deciding not to do it. It is apparently 5.4ish climbing and it looked pretty doable.

The 2nd pitch is supposed to be entirely sport, and while I'm not a trad climber, I really don't think there was anywhere to place gear. Alan Watts apparently thinks it's totes chill, but looking on Mountain Project now, plenty of people call it out for being very run out.

One thing Watts was right about was that other than the runout, it was really nice rock and fun climbing. The "unprotected crux" that Watts mentions is the first pitch, which I guess didn't used to be bolted. The first pitch is real fun imo.


Should add some pics...
View of my belayer just after clipping the first bolt of the 2nd pitch


View of those dudes rapping down from the anchors at the top of the 2nd pitch. They are rapping down the gully I mentioned - the slab I climbed is above that wall on the left in this pic, although a few moves near the beginning involve the gully/wall you see a bit, and the final move involved dismounting the ramp and getting onto the shelf atop the gully, where I'm taking this pic from. An unlucky fall off the ramp with 20+ ft of runout could well have meant decking into this gully and tumbling a good bit.


e: Part of why I "just went for it" was that at the scariest moments, it would have been more sketch to downclimb than to just continue.

e2: If you do make it out there, "Death of a Raven" is close by and was a super fun climb. That was my mental cool-down/re-centering climb.
Also Living Blindly, which is adjacent to Cave Route, is the one I posted a scary bail-out story about a couple months ago. I think it would be a really fun multi-pitch and it was much better bolted. (The reason I had to bail was that we were trying to single-pitch it and there was not enough rope; properly multipitching it would have been lovely I think).

alnilam fucked around with this message at 18:47 on Jun 1, 2022

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Gotcha, at some point I'll go do it and see for myself. I'm pretty comfortable on runout 5.7, but that's because I've climbed much bigger and harder routes. Sounds like a spicy climb for someone with less experience or who is a 5.8ish leader. In that second photo there seem to be some small cracks and pods out left, mostly higher up, that would accept small cams, but from your description is sounds like they're not actually on the route. Also in that first pic there's nothing obvious that would take trad gear, although it's not the best angle to guess at it from. Maybe one of the vertical seams left or right of the rope line, although neither look too promising there.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009



FWIW I am a 5.10a/b leader (outdoors) :D but I am also a very scaredy cat climber who gets scared a lot and just have to work through it.

But like seriously... yes it was very easy climbing. The run out section is listed as 5.4 in the book actually. But IMO part of the point of protection is not just for hard climbs, but also protecting against the unexpected - otherwise why not just free solo? It was easy climbing, but if I had like, tripped, or a rock broke off - the runout was such that I would have decked.

I would be much more sympathetic to runout on a 2nd pitch where the falls would be cleaner, or run-out high up on a single pitch route, where the result might be a big whipper and some scrapes but not a deck. Runout like that spooks me but I do not get mad at it, because I know it's just in my head and falling on that runout would be fine. What upsets me about this pitch is that the runout created opportunity for some bad decking to either side of the climb.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

alnilam posted:

FWIW I am a 5.10a/b leader (outdoors) :D but I am also a very scaredy cat climber who gets scared a lot and just have to work through it.

But like seriously... yes it was very easy climbing. The run out section is listed as 5.4 in the book actually. But IMO part of the point of protection is not just for hard climbs, but also protecting against the unexpected - otherwise why not just free solo? It was easy climbing, but if I had like, tripped, or a rock broke off - the runout was such that I would have decked.

I would be much more sympathetic to runout on a 2nd pitch where the falls would be cleaner, or run-out high up on a single pitch route, where the result might be a big whipper and some scrapes but not a deck. Runout like that spooks me but I do not get mad at it, because I know it's just in my head and falling on that runout would be fine. What upsets me about this pitch is that the runout created opportunity for some bad decking to either side of the climb.

Totally fair, and it's obviously nice/desirable for a route to be protected. I've just done some stupid poo poo in the past like solo the first flatiron and also Tenaya. I'm not saying it's safe because it's easier, but more that it doesn't spook me as much as it probably should anymore. I still get spooked above gear when I'm at my limit, but on easier stuff I can suppress it and just keep moving until I find a bolt or feature that can accept gear.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009



Looking more on Mountain Project, plenty of comments about sketchy runout in the 2nd pitch, and there are apparently a couple of variations that differ from Alan Watts' description. One that looks fun and much less runout to me is doing pitch 1 of Cave Route, then climbing through the funky little tunnel and connecting with pitch 3 of Barred Reality. I actually saw those anchors through the tunnel and they didn't seem too scary to get to. If I go back to that same spot and am in the mood, I might do just that (or just climb Barred Reality in its entirety)

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asur
Dec 28, 2012


It's labeled a 5.7R on MP with the 2nd pitch rated 5.3-5.6. I don't think the R is a carryover from the 5.6 solo, but they don't specifically say.

Bolting philosophy in most places does not agree with "part of the point of protection is not just for hard climbs". I don't know Smith Rock in particular, but this has been true everywhere in the US that I've climbed multi pitch. If the climbing is significantly easier than the grade of overall route, then I would expect runout, regardless of injury potential of a fall, and bolts to be primarily placed before and during hard sections, where hard is relative to the grade of the route.

I don't agree with this and have no idea why everyone seems to think bolts are made of gold, but I'm also not the person paying for them, barring donations.

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