Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Chris! posted:

Me too, I thought I had adequately warmed up but it was extra cold on Sunday and I have hurt my shoulder :(

I was leaning back on it and went for a quite dynamic move which necessitated pulling myself fast across the wall - so going from leaning out on the shoulder with my arm in front, to pushing forward and ending up with that arm outstretched to the side - and I kind of felt it go "ping".

It doesn't feel really bad or anything now, just has a soreness if I raise my arm above shoulder height, and I can feel a slight "grinding" when I do that - again, not agonising or very pronounced, so I don't think I've torn anything, but I'm really pissed off about having to have more time off :(

That is what it felt like when I almost tore my rotator cuff. It sounds mild, but definitely get it looked at. I did physical therapy instead of the surgery (because I didn't tear it all the way) and I still feel an ache if I over use it or sleep on it the wrong way. This injury happened 15 years ago.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Sigmund Fraud posted:

I'll be in Japan for three weeks, namely Tokyo and Hiroshima and plan to bring my shoes. Any good indoor gyms I should check out? I assume there are no sport crags nearby which would justify me bringing a rope and quickies...

These places are decent, though not convenient to downtown Tokyo unless you want to boulder: http://english.pump-climbing.com

This list looks promising for finding climbs: https://www.thecrag.com/climbing/japan

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Nevvy Z posted:

Tried some shoes at a local place. Clintonville Outfitters if any Ohio people hang out here. The guy was super helpful and now my big toes hurt just a tiny bit but that'll stretch. I climbed a bit on their little wall and could really feel the increased friction. Was instantly sold.

In my admittedly limited experience, the toe-heel space stretches less than the rest of the shoe.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

4R7 THi3F posted:

Feeling pretty good right now because I finally managed to climb the last two V1's that were eluding me at my gym. :)

What's the process of learning how to boulder on holds that don't have any grooves to sink your fingers into? Is it like mostly finger/grip strength, or is it a clever way of using tension and pushing yourself up? I tried to climb some V2's and couldn't even start them because they have harder holds :/

I just moved into these this weekend. With the tiny holds, it seems to be more about balance and technique (especially footwork) than sheer grip strength, though I was glad that my fingers and hands have really begun to harden up over the past six months or so.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Colonel J posted:

On the bouldering wall, should I try to downclimb every route I do? I've been jumping a lot from the top of the walls and just realized that there are probably benefits to downclimbing which I'm missing.

Coming down even part of the way before jumping will make it easier on your knees and feet.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Chris! posted:

At my gym, if you want to top rope you use the pre-set gym rope, but if you're on lead you bring your own rope.

This is the case at my gym, as well.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

I'm still on my first shoes and harness after about a year of climbing. 5.10 Spire for shoes and Petzl Corax for the harness. Both have been really good to me, and I've used them for both trad and gym climbing. For my somewhat-wide feet, the unlined Spire has been great. I've found the Corax to fit well and have everything I've needed. The adjustable leg loops are nice for layering up in the cold, and the wide size range means I can loan it out to friends if needed. YMMV, etc.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

armorer posted:

You will wear out your shoes (many pairs) long before you wear out your harness. Even if you climb a ton, your harness should be the longest lived of any of your soft goods, including your rope.

Oh no doubt. Just wanted to make it clear I didn't have a bunch of experience with different harnesses, but that I was pleased with the one I had. The thing still looks practically brand new, while my shoes do not. . . .

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

No downside at all if you're staying on the rock.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

No experience with NC, but trust you've checked here: https://www.mountainproject.com/v/north-carolina/105873282

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Zephro posted:

Slightly odd question: I wear glasses. 98% of the time it's fine but occasionally they get in the way. I have contact lenses but wearing them to the gym seems like a terrible idea - the air has chalk dust in it, dust puffs off the holds, and if you do decide you need to take the lenses out then having mucky, dusty fingers is absolutely not what you want. Or am I worrying too much?

How do they get in the way? If you're worried about them falling off, you can always get a strap to hold them on.

As for the contacts and chalk/other dust, can you give it a try and see if it's even an issue?

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Zephro posted:

Sometimes when doing roped stuff the rope knocks them, which can be annoying. It's not a big deal, just very occasionally irritating.

Lead climbing will fix that issue!

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Speaking of flappers, ever wonder what might happen when your feet blow while in a finger crack?

Also, do the found tips count as booty?

:nms: http://www.mountainproject.com/v/accident-report---indian-creek/112133717?sf48664390=1:nms:

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Baronash posted:

Are there ways to prevent getting exhausted while trying to get over an overhang?

Move fast through the hardest part (the crux).

e: Edited to note that not every crux is overcome through speed, though overhangs tend to favor those who can move through smartly!

Business of Ferrets fucked around with this message at 01:05 on Sep 10, 2016

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

SplitDestiny posted:

We climbed the big rock! We did it!

Well done! What an accomplishment!

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

MacMillan posted:

Do you guys know of any proper sites or resources where I can sell some shoes? I manage a climbing gym and plenty of people would love to sell their shoes both new and used. A lot of these guys buy online deals and don't realize the challenges of fitting climbing shoes.

Side question -- any of you guys looking for specific shoes between 5.10/sportiva? We have a lot of returns, mostly used once. I'll let you know what we have in stock.

I've had good experiences both buying and selling on geartrade.com

The site takes a commission but the process couldn't be easier.

You have any TC Pros banging around? Not sure what my LS size would be.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Ravenfood posted:

So if I have Dyneema cord, can I make a decent anchor by girth hitching two carabineers and then girth hitching it to my tie-in loops? I am definitely not going to climb above it, but I want something to use for setting up to rappel off. I'm still only doing single pitch climbs and will be for awhile. Am I missing something?

This was discussed at a self-rescue course I attended this summer. Advice was to use nylon runners en lieu of dyneema, as nylon's higher melting point better handled the friction involved with that use. If dyneema must be used (such as in an emergency), it seems better to "basket" the sling through the tie-in loops, effectively making it redundant. Basketing is passing the whole sling through the loops, then tying together in a single knot, leaving a double strand which can rotate in the loops.

Here is my preferred rappel setup, with built-in tether. For cleaning top rope anchors, a second sling tether with locking biner will give redundancy. I don't use one, but a PAS could serve here as well.

Other options are a "cow's tail" made from a short length of dynamic climbing rope (bomber, but purpose built) or heavier (7mm+) nylon cordelette. The latter is one of my favorite, most versatile pieces of kit, awesome for anchors, rescue spiders and more.

Also, get professional training if in doubt!

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

I love my Spires. Unlined leather was the key to fitting my wide feet. And I'm mediocre at climbing anyway so I guess they fit the bill all around!

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

whodatwhere posted:

I have a sort of technical question, my labmate and I were going over various toprope setups. The way that I have typically done it in the past(trees are common for TR anchors here) is with static line- backed up fig-8 on one leg and webbing around second tree with a backed up clove hitch on a locker joining the webbing and static line. But, assuming you have enough static rope, is there any reason you can't do another fig-8 and just clove hitch a locker on that loop? So the same line. The clove hitch is just for easy adjusting for the master point. Hopefully my lovely mspaint diagram can clear up what I'm asking. The issue I see is that the carabiner is essentially going to be pulling and weighting the knot, maybe in theory rolling the figure-8? Maybe a bowline/EDK are better for that approach, or that approach is just no good because of the carabiner pulling on the knot to begin with?
Thanks

vs


Sorry I'm late to this, but if the blue is static line (11mm would be ideal) and you have enough, why not just do double bowline on first tree and double bowline-on-a-bight on the second? Then a BHK master point. Cleaner, uses less gear, and much stronger than webbing.

It's also the first half of a 3-in-1 anchor, which is especially useful when doing a top-managed site, as it provides a safety tether and both high and low master points. (The 3-in-1 is covered in the Single Pitch Instructor manual but I couldn't find a good online example, sorry.)

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Did my first trad lead rope soloing today. Complete success! Not scary at all if you have your systems dialed, but youíve got to have your systems down cold.

Standard disclaimer: Donít solo climb, yer gonna die, etc.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Tactical Lesbian posted:

trad rope solo seems like a huge amount of logistical effort

is this true, expert rope technician Business of Ferrets?

Ha, hardly an expert!

It does take longer to get moving up the climb, since you need a good anchor and to make sure the rope is set correctly in your fall-arrest device. Then a few backup knots, ideally attached to the harness to help with rope drag. Nobody is there to check your setup, so taking oneís time and triple-checking everything seems to be a good habit to get into.

But once everything is set, it pretty much goes like regular trad climbing. The climb from the anchor to the first piece of pro is a bit spooky because there isnít anyone there to spot you, but once past that it was pretty familiar. Just untie the backup knots as they come along and make sure there isnít too much slack in the system.

There wasnít a walk-off at the top, but since the climb was a single pitch and shorter than half the length of the rope, I just built a rappel anchor, fed some slack into the system, and rappelled down, collecting pro as I went. Downclimbing was an even simpler, but less secure option. Multipitch would be a lot more complex, involving fixing rope at the top of the pitch, rappelling to collect pro/clean the bottom anchor, then solo top roping or jumaring back up. Will have to work my way up to that.

Overall, though, it was great fun, and really satisfying to get the climbing in on my own timeline without an available partner. Over the years, Iíve had formal instruction in anchor building and self-rescue, along with practice. Probably would not have felt comfortable going it alone without that.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

jiggerypokery posted:

What was the setup, roughly?

Silent Partner, 10.2 rope clove hitched in 4-5 meter loops to lockers attached to belay loop for backup and rope-drag reduction.

spwrozek posted:

I always wondered why people rope solo.

It seems to boil down to:

They love climbing so much that they can't find enough partners.
They really suck to climb with so they can't find partners.
They really like to do way more work than needed, enjoy the "tedious challenge".

I know people who really enjoy it but I think I would lose my mind.

All of the above! In seriousness, though, my schedule and work/life commitments make it hard to find and keep good partners, so when I just need to climb in the middle of a random workday and have the time off, its rope solo or take a pass. If I had a partner available, that always would be my preference.

That said, Iím very wary of the technical climbing tradecraft of many of the locals; a friend got to an ice climb last winter only to find a group of locals with a drill planning to use expansion bolts to ďboltĒ the ice. . . . He probably saved their lives by talking them into leaving.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Partial Octopus posted:

So my friend and I have a lot of experience top roping and lead climbing in the gym but we've never done outdoor climbing. We looked up some beginner outdoor climbs in our area and found some top rope spots.

Is it a terrible idea for us to go and top rope outdoors with only gym experience? I looked up instructions on how to tie into an anchor. It seems pretty simple. Mostly just posting here as a sanity check before I go and get us killed by missing something stupid.

I was planning on using this technique that I found assuming the anchor at the top is similar. https://www.climbing.com/skills/bolted-toprope-anchors/
I would of course practice tying the knot at home or at the gym. I have no experience repelling, so I would hike back down around to the beginning of the climb after setting up the rope.

Please tell me if I'm being dumb.

Late to this, but want to note that the edge of a cliff is a dangerous place, so be sure you (or the more experienced person you plan to have come along) is tethering if necessary to avoid going over the edge. Also, donít assume the anchors at the top will be similar to bolted chains. Guidebooks and internet sites often will indicate the nature of top anchors, which can vary from trees to boulders to rock cracks to hardware, depending on the popularity and local ethic of a place, and youíll need different materials for those. Watch for cyclical loading of the anchor material. Anchor building is not rocket science but if you mess it up thatís bad bad bad.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply