Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Fontoyn posted:

I have some pretty awful pain at the top of my wrist whenever I release most jug holds with my right hand. The pain comes and gos pretty quickly but is a real bitch to deal with when I boulder. Any ideas?

Sounds like carpal tunnel.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Some advice I got recently was to do with the trailing foot when making a tough move, most people (including good climbers I know) drag their trailing foot up the wall for stability when moving up. If you watch professional boulderers you'll see that the trailing foot is stuck out so it doesn't have a chance to get caught on anything and isn't pulling against the wall. The way to practice this is to do traverses, falling onto holds and holding the barn door on every move, this apparently gets your body used to keep the foot out and activating the obliques for balance instead of the second foot. It's something I'm trying now (particularly for a couple of slab routes that have ridiculous no handed step ups to off balance crimps which are kicking my rear end).

That all said I'm in the same position as you, I'm considering buying the how to climb 3 grades harder book, it's been recommended by a couple of people to me now, and apparently even though the website looks like a scam site, it isn't and the book is pretty comprehensive.

http://www.howtoclimbthreegradesharder.com/

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


benwards posted:

I finally blew out the toe on my Boreal Jesters, and it's time for a new pair of shoes. I have wide feet with high arches, do you guys have any recommendations for a shoe that won't crush my feet laterally? I climb mostly indoors, 5.10 up to weaksauce 5.12, V3/4. Some outdoor sport climbing from time to time. Mostly flat wall and slab, I'm not a big fan of overhang and don't do a ton of it. Help!

I have similar feet to you and so far I've been good with 5.10 Anasazi VCS, they lasted ages and had a really strong heel.

I had a pair of evolv bandits but they were excruciating to break into, once they did though I don't think I've had a better performing mid range shoe.

Currently using 5.10 Coyotes because they are super comfortable and perform fine, edging and heel hooking on them are both great considering the comfort and they aren't too expensive either.

In terms of the grades I climb at, I'm currently around the V5/6 level (not that it means much but I've not climbed harder than that anywhere).

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


If you're indoor Bouldering in London I would really recommend the arch 2 as the place to go, the quality and range of route setting there is some of the best I've seen in the country and their training area is brilliant.

They also have a really good coach though from what I hear he can be quite expensive.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


I'm partial to the beast maker boards myself.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


I've found the climb On balm bar to be really good for flappers, just chip some off at night and pack it into the skin and it really speeds up the healing.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


YourCreation posted:

These just hit the climbing scene in the UK and they have done a marvelous job of de-stinking my shoes.

http://www.bananafingers.co.uk/boot-bananas-p-1654.html

Seconding this, they are miracle workers, a single pair of them fixed a pair of evolv bandits that had turned as well as keeping my new coyotes fresh. I got them in the summer and they are only now starting to lose their effectiveness.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Ingenium posted:

So what are some good things to watch for to prevent injuries? My friend stressed to me the importance of paying attention to any elbow pain and to stop climbing if it starts hurting. I ask this because I have been feeling things like aching wrists the night after climbing, but I am not sure if that is a large issue.

I've found the easiest way to prevent injury is a decent warmup, and by decent I mean 30-45 minutes.

Pain after any sort of exercise is normal, what you need to look out for is the type of pain, a dull throbbing pain most of the time is nothing to be worried about and is part and parcel. Sharp spiking pain or recurring long term pain is injury, the night after is fine, if they hurt for a week it's probably something else.

But as with anything if you're not sure just go see a doctor.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Ingenium posted:

What do you tend to do with your warmup? Do you just do easier routes?

I start with 5 minutes of leg stretching, especially hams. Then lots of various hangs on different types of holds in the fingerboard area (nothing too hard, slopers, pinches etc).

If I'm in the climbing centre with the big sloper campus rungs I'll do some dynamic stuff on that, otherwise super slow pull ups followed by some faster ones.

Finish off with some easy routes with quiet feet.

After I started doing this I have never since had a problem with joint pain in my elbows/wrists (I used to get elbow pain all the time).

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Actually falling is one of the bigger concerns with a weight vest, anything you do with one you should always be able to do under full control, even landing on soft matting with an extra 10-15kgs on you is going to carry a very strong risk.

e: I'm talking about bouldering, I have no idea about using one with roped climbing.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Reformed Tomboy posted:

A number of things can degrade the rubber on shoes. Plenty of places will resole them for you, and it's way cheaper than getting new shoes. Unless you want new shoes anyway. And if that's the case, there are few places you can donate you old shoes so they can recycle them to make new ones.


hahaha those aren't old! My dad uses pair of La Sportiva shoes he bought in '79. Those are ancient shoes. Of course, he's had them resoled a few times, but still.


In shoe-related talk, I have a longer second toe that smashes in the front of my shoes. I'd been waiting for it to happen, but today my nail finally fell off. It didn't hurt, but it definitely gave me the willies. Anyway, does anyone else experience this? What shoes do you use? Or are my mutant toes doomed? For reference, I have Mad Rock Banshees.

The nail on the big toe of my left foot just doesn't grow any more from where I smashed it into a pointy bit of rock. I'd say it's part and parcel.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


modig posted:

A nice exercise for this is try to climb something like a 5.7 (generally just not as hard as you can handle, so it will move up as yo move up) without bending your elbows. It limits what you can do with your arms, and forces you to focus more on the rest of your body.

It would be hilarious to watch someone take this completely literally.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Ugh I finally recovered from a ruptured tendon in my knee and a triple whammy of a sprained ankle on the same leg, only to be doing a compression move last night and something in my other ankle popped (audibly enough for everyone around me to hear).

Guess it's time for another trip to the hospital, any ideas what it could be before I go, do I need to go?
It keeps popping and sending shooting pains up my leg when I try and walk.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Stangg posted:

Ugh I finally recovered from a ruptured tendon in my knee and a triple whammy of a sprained ankle on the same leg, only to be doing a compression move last night and something in my other ankle popped (audibly enough for everyone around me to hear).

Guess it's time for another trip to the hospital, any ideas what it could be before I go, do I need to go?
It keeps popping and sending shooting pains up my leg when I try and walk.

I went to the hospital and apparently it is a good idea even if you just think it's a sprain as the force of a ligament or tendon breaking in your ankle can break off a piece of bone/fracture the ankle.

All my xrays came back clean though so its just a a ruptured ligament and a few weeks off climbing.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Chris! posted:

I guess I should just be careful for a while and try and fall better in future?


This was a good read!

I'm pretty sure people sticking out their arms when they fall is the biggest cause of indoor bouldering injuries, from what I've seen and amongst my friends it's usually when a beginner is not used to falling or is scared of falling from the route, how long have you been climbing? I normally tell them to progressively jump off from higher and higher to get used to the height, that way your body won't automatically panic when you slip off a route, and you can just control your fall properly.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Someone recently asked me to spot them while they did a route than involved standing up on a box volume tilted about 35 degrees with no hands.

I had no idea what they expected me to do because all the damage would have been done when their foot slipped and they smashed their face on all the holds/volume.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Sounds like a small tear in the pulley, they are common and the cure is to rest for a week or two and then ease back into climbing on to it.

This seems to be the go to article for pulley injuries:

http://onlineclimbingcoach.blogspot.co.uk/2010/05/pulley-injuries-article.html

It has helped me and I'm sure others on here.

In other news it looks like I'm going to be out of climbing for at least another month, the ligament rupture in my ankle just isn't healing, every day it pops at some point and remains painful (4 weeks after it happened). I'm not even sure I can do other exercise that because just stretching my body makes it pop and send shooting pains up my leg so I think weightlifting is out of the question.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


jackchaos posted:

Off the bat dynamic moves give me trouble I climb pretty calculated and static ie I, love a good crimp to nipple lock off. But as soon as there is a big move I just get shut down.

Campus training?

edit: To wit, I had good success with the power section of this training plan
http://www.climbing.com/skill/your-goal-boulder-harder/

Stangg fucked around with this message at 23:18 on Apr 9, 2013

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


ZeroDays posted:

I've never had foot odour problems before, and am about to chuck out my few month old evolvs purely on principle. Ugh.

Two words: boot bananas.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


ZeroDays posted:

It's past that point though surely? I mean, they loving stink, and boot bananas are a preventative measure rather than a cure. "Not evolvs" is what I'm going for. Someone said earlier that leather is a better material, so I'll go that route.

Edit: just ordered the boot bananas too.

They fixed my evolvs after they had turned (bandits), took about two weeks.

In terms of how long they last, they finally lost their effect about 6 weeks ago and I bought them I think July last year.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Frown Town posted:

left elbow, inner? Hard for me to extend but I can bend it with a little pain. Can close and open my fist. Hurts a bit, probably like a 6.5/10 if 10 is max, but pain is a little better an hour later

You should probably go and get it looked at, they will probably xray in case there is a small fracture (not entirely unlikely).

edit: Quote is not edit sorry.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


ZeroDays posted:

My shoes are at the point of having to be stored in a lead casket, as they can drop small children within 10 feet, so I'll report on the bananas once I pick them up from the post office and try them for a week or so. Also, I stored them on the windowsill (because gently caress them ponging up my flat) and they got rained on. Damp shoes smell far worse.

bananas have a drying agent in them to soak up moisture so have no fear!

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


spwrozek posted:

I didn't mean to sound haughty about shoes. But when people ask me if any new gear ( in any of the sports I do) will make them better I kinda laugh. It could, but I like to look at technique first.

If they are worn out by all means upgrade though.

Yeah the only time I've felt an actual difference thanks to a shoe is when I'm doing something narly like the beastmaker where having something really aggressive actually helped me stick the tiny edges. Otherwise I'm perfectly happy in my coyotes with enough room for socks.

This doesn't apply to when I need to edge where the hole in my shoe is though, sometimes it sticks but I'm probably losing some skin too.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Sniper Party posted:

Thanks, those look like they're going to be very helpful. And yeah, I figure most of my problems stem from poor or nonexistent footwork. I'm so used to smooth concrete walls with no footholds I constantly forget to concentrate on my feet and they just end up supporting or balancing while my arms do most of the work.

So no particular brands or anything I should avoid? The pricing points are probably pretty different here in Finland, but I'll just grab a cheapish pair that doesn't murder my feet too much.

Climbing shoes are a really personal thing, you could get a list of shoes people love and hate in this very forum and amongst your climbing friends and they will mostly be different. Go for something that feels tight on your feet, try them out if you can and don't bother with something aggressive if it's your first shoe. Evolv, FiveTen and La Sportiva all make shoes at a decent price point that will do the job just fine for a starter shoe.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Year of the Monkey posted:

Thanks for the response. Perhaps blister is the wrong word but they're not calluses. The best way I can describe it is that it's like two layers of skin separating without the top layer tearing off. It's a pretty distinct feeling when it happens. The result is a circular patch of connected but loose skin. If I keep climbing on it the loose skin tears off. My hands are pretty well callused already but perhaps not where this is occurring, on the skin between the top two knuckles on several fingers. Hopefully the skin will toughen up to the point where it stops being a problem.

One night where I was practicing dynos to slopers for height I ended up literally wearing a hole into one of my fingertips, there's also an issue of splitting skin if you like to climb too soon after showering/being very wet.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


eithedog posted:

At my wall (UK) you're required to get a training on how to tie rope knots, spot your partner and do assecuration of unexpected falls (basically - how to loosen the rope and where to keep your hands). They don't do anything related to free climbing - everything is padded, though I guess it's noticeable when falling down, from, I guess, 2m. Having no frame of reference I don't know what you should really be taught and when it becomes expected(?) for you to know these kind of things. Although I must say that I feel a little apprehensive when somebody is even on hands reach (I just find myself different problem), or, worse yet - reaching their hands as if to catch me if I fall (even if I fall, it's not the height that I will do something to myself; I'll try to avoid hitting you anyhow, and that's why I'll probably fall in weird way); maybe that's why people hurt themselves even when falling from small heights - it's sort of trust thing?

Falling injuries from bouldering indoors come from people stiffening up when they fall and sticking out a limb to break it. All the gyms I've climbed at (also UK) offer an optional but recommended induction for bouldering and from what I've seen it's general safety as well as getting people to jump off and land in a relaxed way. I think a lot of beginners don't do this and somewhere down the line they do something harder and when they fall have no idea what it feels like and just panic, regardless of height.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


This is happening at the moment in London, 6 female climbers scaling the shard to protest oil drilling in the arctic.

http://iceclimb.savethearctic.org/?fbshare

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Chris! posted:

There's the southern sandstone for some good bouldering in Kent - probably 45 mins or an hour or so from London (maybe a bit further, never done that journey myself as I come from the other direction). Look up Bowles rocks and Harrison's Rock, I've done Bowles and it's pretty great.

For indoor bouldering there are tons of gyms in London but I don't know any specific ones myself, White Spider is meant to be good for top roping.

For indoor bouldering The Arch 2 (nicknamed the biscuit) near London bridge is by far the best in London, and I'd hazard to throw out there one of the best in the country. The quality and variety of route setting is top par and they even hosted a British qualifier there last year/earlier this year. The training area is also amazing.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


matryx posted:

I'm at the biscuit factory 2-3 times a week [Bermondsey Tube Station is the closest tube btw] and would recommend it as much if not more than my previous favourite at Mile End Climbing Wall. I used to live closer to there so it was more convenient, and the walls are higher, though the setting tends to be more brute-force at ME over the biscuit.
I climb Tues/Thurs after work and often first thing on sunday morning so give a holler if you see me (Male, 6'2ish, usually long bright purple hair) as I'll always climb with anyone. Though right now I'm wussing out of basically everything as I don't want to risk injury before I get married next month.

I should be back in London next month and hopefully back at the biscuit (providing all is well with my ankle) so I'll say hello if I see you. I'll be weak as a kitten too as it's coming up to 3 months since I've been able to climb :smith:

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Ha, so I just opened up an unmarked envelope in some post I was forwarded and its from the end of March after I went to A&E for my ankle injury. It turns out that what was originally diagnosed as "just a ruptured tendon" and told to rest and then walk off, had in fact also fractured the ankle bone and I was asked to come in to sort out proper treatment.

I love the NHS, no markings on the envelope, no sense of urgency or any indication it was a medical document.

I'm in between permanent living arrangements at the minute and the injuries clinic here told me to go away and register with a new doctor so they could get my records and then refer me to a bone specialist, guess I'll wait a couple of weeks till I'm back in London, it's been a few months, few more weeks can't hurt.

I doubt there is much they can do now aside from either say "It's healed by itself" or "yeah that's going to need surgery".

I sincerely hope its not the second option as it's already been so long since I've been able to climb and I was hoping to get back on the wall when I get back to London :(

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


In relation to the indoor spotting chat earlier, this was posted a couple of days ago:

http://www.climbingbusinessjournal.com/spotting-maybe-not/

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


azreal posted:

So went to the indoor gym today and hit the bouldering area pretty hard...tore up my hands pretty good. Is this normal, and what's the best way to treat it?


If you want to climb again soon then when the skin hardens a bit on those callouses you can file them down to stop them catching as much.

Also, I sincerely hope you weren't wearing those rings while climbing.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

I'll probably get some of the Evolv bandits and I am quite worried about the smell :ohdear: I have slept on portaledges with used Evolvs next to me, and of a choice between the poop tube and the Evolvs, I would throw the Evolvs off every time.

I had a pair of bandits and they got unbearable until I got some boot bananas, they fixed em right up in about a week and stopped the smell seeping out while they were in.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

I've started with preventative medicine for flappers. I just trim the calluses down with a nail clipper every few weeks as I seem to have hands which refuse to turn into rhinohide but just stay permanently callused and have done for years.

Yeah I find filing them down pre-session to be helpful too, especially if I'm going to be campusing.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Red Oktober posted:

Does anyone have any experience with using proteins for recovery? I'm looking to pick some up to take just after climbing but I'm getting pretty confused with what does what.

A high protein diet is good for any sport really, it doesn't matter when you take it (it doesn't need to be straight after, though this has been debated a fair bit but I am of the side that it really doesn't matter and feel that the scientific evidence backs this up).

There are various ways to recover and it really depends on the intensity and frequency of your training. With a good diet you really only need to look into doing something different if you're climbing for hours every day or training twice a day, things like that.

In terms of joint/tendon recovery I'm not sure there is much you can really do aside from rest, they don't respond in the same way as muscles from what I've read.

Protein gives you the building blocks you need to recover from micro tears in the muscles which is what makes them grow/get stronger. Carbohydrates are used to replenish the glycogen stores you burn off during physical activity. That's a very basic explanation, if you want more detail check out some of the other threads on lifting/diet as there are plenty of materials there that will go into more depth.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply