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henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


With the time off you probably just lost some strength and that's why you aren't climbing as hard. To get better though start thinking more about what each movement will do to your body position, how your body is going to want to swing and figure out how to control that swing. Climb easier routes slowly and in control, making each move as smooth as you can. Watch videos of climbers and the good climbers at your gym, and deconstruct how they move and why. Don't just watch and try to do the same thing, watch and think about why the did it the way they did. A good drill is to climb easy stuff doing "isolaters" as I call them. Only move your hips+torso when all 4 points are on the wall, and keep your hips+torso still when moving any limb. You can still twist your hips some when moving your feet, but don't change their location. Try to keep pivoting of feet and regripping holds to a minimum as well when moving your body. Isolaters always help me with deconstructing climbing movements and make them feel more natural and in control when climbing regularly. They also make you strong.

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henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


To jump on the hangboard discussion, anyone got recommendations? I've got 10+ years experience an am stating to climb hard again after a few years break from training. Taking it slow and smart with the training but I'm beginning to look at boards. Thinking of the DRCC V5.12 board which I've heard from people can be taken to 5.13/v9 with shims pretty easily. Anyone used one? I've got access to prodeals on metolius, EP, So-Ill and a few other companies but I'm not really liking what I'm seeing, though the EP kine board looks interesting.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


ZeroDays posted:

Wow, concentrating on foot work and really paying attention to my feet instead of always trying to reach has immensely improved my climbing. It's one of those things that I knew you were supposed to do, but never actually practiced. So simple, yet so effective. I was always complaining about how my 6,3" partner had the advantage (I'm 5'7") because he could reach poo poo that I couldn't, but I realised I'd revolutionised how I approached a climb when I statically completed a move he had to dyno. Obviously I'm a beginner (been climbing a few months) but it's exciting when things just click.

This is awesome.

henne fucked around with this message at 18:42 on Mar 6, 2013

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Are there any other setters in here that have some good blogs/articles on setting mechanics and movement analysis? Trying to get better at setting specific movement that isn't body type specific and get a better understanding of the mechanics of climbing and how climbing really works. Stuff like routecrafting.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


jackchaos posted:

I haven't really read anything. The closest I've gotten is having the head setter for the bay area touch stone gyms come and do a day long clinic. So if you find cool articles post them!


routecrafting.blogspot.com isn't updated anymore but has some good reading. A friend has met him an climbed his routes and the author sets well.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


armorer posted:

Portland Metro Area Goons - I'll be out there in late July with my wife, and am looking for some advice regarding outdoor climbing spots. Last year I was out around that time and went to Smith Rock for two days. I loved it, but a lot of it was too difficult for my wife (you really need to climb 5.11 or 5.12 to get the most out of Smith Rock) so we had to stick to only a few sections. She also got sketched out by the misery ridge trail. It turns out she doesn't like trails with a lot of exposure and loose material underfoot, but we can just avoid that next time.

I guess I'm asking - Should I just take a few days and drive back out to Smith Rock? Or should I make a few day trips to some of these other areas instead?

Smith has a lot of great moderate climbing, you just have to look for it, it's not in the main climbing areas. Bunch of fun stuff in the marsupials, adit rock, pheonix butress, spiderman butress and mesa verde wall all come to mind. If you wife likes multipitching, there are a ton of fun easy multipitch routes all over smith. Where Ever I may Roam is 5.9 and great, White Satin and Lost in Space are both amazing and 5.10b/c ish. Smith is so big and so many people in the area crank its easy to get stuck in the popular hard areas. Take some time and explore the park. If you have the Smith Rock Select guide look at getting the full version by Allan Watts. The new version has details on climbing all over the park while the Select is pretty minimal in content.

Last time I was at carver it was mostly bouldering with some roped climbing. The climbing was either easy or real hard. Check in at PRG for legal situation at Carver, you may have to sign something to be allowed on the land.

Never been to Broughton Bluff and as far as I know Beacon Rock is almost all trad. I don't know much about these places but look into French's Dome, Bolo (or something, its on Hood somewhere) and Ozone as well. Places I've heard of that are within a few hours of Hood. I don't think the Madrone Wall is open again yet but look at that just in case?

Hope I've been some help, I might be climbing out there at the same time so maybe we'll run into each other or something.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


armorer posted:

I would love to climb Wherever I may Roam, but I think my wife may get really sketched out going through Asterisk pass.

Climb White Satin or Lost in Space which are on the front side of astrix, rap down to the base of where ever I may roam, climb it, then rap back down and walk around the smith rock group and climb at phoenix butt on the way out would be a fun day of lots of 5.9 - 5.10c climbing and no trip over astrix. There is like a move or two of 5.10c on lost in space that can be french freed if you have to.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Cybor Tap posted:

God I hate grading problems.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Caf posted:

I have my first bouldering competition this coming Friday and I'm starting to get excited.

Any advice?

Eat well coming into the comp. Don't warm up too hard, you probably have more climbing time then you can use if you climb like its a workout. Get an idea of the whole comp's point system or whatever and figure out how hard you want to climb and which routes are in that range. Take your time climbing, read the routes heavily as you wait your turn in the stack. Climb efficiently and rest between attempts,and take time to eat and drink throughout the day. Don't get too attached to one problem because it is so close and ignore potentially higher point values. If you can find a route that has a crux that is just your "style" it may be worth more points and more fun to climb. Have fun with it, it's still just climbing which is all because it's so fun.

henne fucked around with this message at 06:57 on Dec 11, 2013

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Tarnien posted:

I already have a BD Access Hoody for midlayer, but these look good. I'll keep them in mind in the future. Was more looking for baselayers for warmth in very cold conditions (high of 21 in Smith next weekend...), so grabbed a top and bottom Arc Teryx Phase SV. Hopefully now I won't freeze to death. Thanks for the suggestions!

I climb at smith most of the time I go outside, and I like to climb in a long sleeve icebreaker baselayer and this. I also have a big down puffy I wear belaying along with some gloves. When you climb take off the puffy and go quick in the base and light midlayer, then get back down and get in your puffy again.

You want to wear something tight and stretchy that will block the wind. When its really cold at smith it has to be sunny to warm the rock so if you can block the wind you can get warm. A big puffy or too much layering will make you hot climbing and climbing in a puffy sucks anyways.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I've been wearing my sportiva Futuras for more than a year at this point and they are awesome. I'm thinking of getting a pair of sportiva Testarossas as an outdoor shoe for hard thin stuff, but for everything I've been doing the Futuras have been great. Anyone else climbing in these?

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Dumbdog posted:

How do you find the lack of edge on the Futuras?

Honestly its been so long since I've climbed in an edged shoe with any downturn I don't really remember how it feels, but I have no complaints with the lack of edge. I think it took me a few sessions to get used to it, but now I love them. I feel like I can pivot my foot on holds to match body position changes better as the contact patch of the shoe isn't so location specific. I never feel like I'm going to move my heel too far one direction and pivot right off the edge of the shoe, instead I think I can feel them getting less secure until they skate off instead of just suddenly blowing. They edge well, they smear great, especially for a down turned shoe, I think they are really comfortable for how tight I sized them, and I can't tell if they have any significant wear on them after a year. As there isn't an edge to round off, they don't change how they climb as they get more worn in, which is nice. I'd recommend them to anyone who is climbing v4/5 or 5.11 or above. I think new climbers would be fine in them, I just think their main benefit is for someone who uses their feet a lot an can appreciate the change.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


climbing

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Puseklepp posted:

Well yeah, but cause it's a bit of a trip to get to the climbing gym, I'm only going in the weekends for the time being at least. So I'd like to add something into my normal gym routine that'd help my climbing as well.

Sorry, I should have elaborated more. Climbing can be very hard on the tendons in your hand, and almost all of the new climbers I know who tried to train grip strength outside of climbing more have injured themselves in a way that can take months to fully heal, with a high chance of catastrophic re injury during rehab exercises. By only training your fingers during your infrequent climbing sessions you increase recovery time and decrease the potential for increasing load on your tendons before you are ready for it. Tendons do not strengthen like muscles, they do not respond well to overloading and when they are tired it is very easy to hurt them with little to no warning.

Take it easy as you start climbing, use the lack of perceived finger strength to work on your footwork and body position techniques. Instead of falling off a route and saying "arg if only my fingers were stronger I'd be able to hold on", instead think of it as "how can i position myself to reduce how hard I have to pull on that hold". Focus on finding the best way to position your body to reduce the strength with which you must pull on each hold on a route, then attempt to string together moves that move you from one position of rest to another. Not only will this make you feel less limited by your current strength, the technique you build through doing this will help you later on.

Do not get a hangboard. Do not get rock rings. Do not use campus boards. Learn the difference between an open and closed crip, and focus on using open crimps only. This will both increase your hand strength gains while reducing your potential for injury. If it feels like you have muscular soreness in your fingers, stop climbing until it goes away. There are no muscles in your hands, these are your tendons hurting. They do not respond to overload and then hyper recovery or whatever it is. It is okay to have surface tenderness from the holds on your skin, but if it hurts inside your fingers please stop until it doesn't.

Please be careful, tendon injuries are terrible and take a long time to heal. I am sorry if it sounds like I am going off on you, but as I have seen climbing get more and more popular recently I have seen huge numbers of new climbers with the beginning of tendon injures, either in their fingers or in their elbows. If something feels off, please take a few days until it feels ALL THE WAY BETTER, not just less painful. This can be hard as a new climber, but 3 days off can prevent an injury keeping you from climbing for 3+ months.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Yeah that's pretty normal, I like to massage my fingers or fully open and close my hands after climbing to maintain blood flow and help prevent this. I would worry if you felt DOMS or had pain on finger opening and closing, stiffness is fine.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


gamera009 posted:

I've gotten a lot of gains out the beastmaker,

I sometimes think I climb like [a beginner] though.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


modig posted:

Since we're on finger chat, any thoughts on how to prep your fingers/elbows for returning to harder climbing. I could climb like 12a in the gym pretty reliably, then I haven't climbed for like 2 months and want to ease back in. I'm trying to move up the grades slowly (which is easy at first since I'm tired after a 10a right now, but will get harder), but it wouldn't be crazy to do some other prep.

You are doing the right thing, your tendons need to get stronger just like they did the first time. They are not muscles, you will not have muscle memory gains in your tendons. Take it easy, your tendons aren't any harder to injure because you have climbed in the past. It can be really hard not to try harder routes that you have the muscular strength for, but avoid climbing hard crimpy things, I have multiple friends who have injured themselves while regaining strength by climbing something too hard too soon. Slopers and pinches are a bit safer as they put less load on the pulleys but still be careful.

AriTheDog posted:

Simply being able to do a pull up makes an immense difference in your ability to climb. If you can't muscle up anything at all, you're going to have problems with anything overhung. If you're overweight, or have weak grip strength, you're going to have problems period. Do you need to do hangboard training in order to get past this? No. But using an assistive pull-up machine and strengthening your core through yoga (or climbing or whatever) will make a big difference over time, and less weight makes everything easier.

I would once again recommend against training strength outside of climbing as a new climber. Returning to climbing, go hard on the core and upper body workouts all you want. But as a new climber I think the experience you gain as a weakling will do wonders for learning how to move in a way that requires the least strength possible. Yeah, overhanging stuff will be hard until you get a handle on hip twisting and using floating flags to rotate your torso. I can make larger reaches from an extended arm through proper torso rotation than I can through a one arm lockoff and keeping myself square to the wall. Yes you will get to v2 faster through strength and grip training, but you will just hit that wall so much harder than if you get to v2 through natural progression from climbing. The best climbers I know are the ones who started young, not because of their years of experience, but because they spent their early years unable to build much muscle mass and had to learn how to best use what they had.

True on the less weight though.

henne fucked around with this message at 22:26 on Mar 3, 2014

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I've heard that light workouts are necessary for tendons to heal because it promotes blood flow that the tendon doesn't get normally and that improves healing. I had a tendon that wouldn't get better until I started climbing easy for 15-20 minutes a few times a week. No progress before but its starting to feel better and stronger, though still weaker than my other fingers.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I do some canyoneering in Oregon. Really fun stuff, lots of swimming and wet canyons.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Heard real good things about the new bd ones. Borrowed a storm and the rechargeable one a couple times and liked em. I have their old micro light and its good for what it is.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


armorer posted:


There are ways to tape your fingers to provide additional support for the pulleys, but I haven't tried any of them personally. There is a lot of useful information online about pulley tendon injuries if you google a bit.

I've heard taping pre injury does very little to prevent injury, and taping post injury is more of a reminder and stabiliEr than a fix. Taping tight enough to act as a pully would cut off all circulation to your finger and be counter productive. I could be wrong though.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


They have a dumb name

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Buy futuras, suck less

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Haha I pay 6 for a day pass.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I have an older version of that harness and really like it. That said the leg loops aren't adjustable and I think they run small. I tighten the waist belt all the way to fit and the leg loops barely fit over my (not very big) thighs. I actually got the harness when a friend couldn't get it over his legs and he gave it to me. I don't like the petzl harnesses with the double waist adjustment but have been very happy with all of the Black Diamond harnesses I have owned/worn, as have all of my friends with BD harnesses. Most harnesses and load bearing climbing gear in general isn't returnable, so I'd highly advise trying one on before you buy if at all possible.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


www.amazon.com posted:

I got around to stopping at rei today to try some harnesses on and of the bunch I tried on the black diamond momentum turned out to be the one that seemed to fit the best. I posted up above about a few momentum harnesses that were somehow different. ie the DS and SA. Would it be safe to assume that they should fit the same. I'm still not even really sure what the differences are after looking at specs and stuff.

Edit... Maybe that question is not on point considering the DS version only comes in 2 sizes s-m and l-xl whereas the SA version has all the individual sizes listed. crap.

It appears that the DS has a Double Sided adjustment, whereas the SA has a Single Adjustment point. I think that's the only difference and unless you need crazy size range I'd go with the SA. I've used some of petzel's double adjust harnesses and I don't like how they sit but once again YMMV and BD might do it better.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


guppy posted:

I have an Adjama. I like it, although I seem to be right in the middle of two sizes, so I have the bigger one and just tighten it down a lot. I was thinking of changing to a Corax when this one wears out because of the double-buckle waist. Why didn't you like that?

It sags in the the front on me and everyone I've seen wearing it. Its also a pain to adjust two buckles and the tail management is absolute poo poo even compared to other petzl harnesses. It's also one of the least comfortable harnesses for me to hang in I've ever worn including some really lightweight sport harnesses I've used.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Also traverse a lot if you are working on technique, a good way to work on movement without using a lot of strength.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


tricams are active pro as well

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


We use volumes from EP that have ~1/2" thick baseboard with slots for standard cap screws to attach to the wall and fiberglass volume bit that attaches to the base via wood screws. The fiberglass makes up the shape of the volume and has T nuts bonded in. Works pretty well, you can pull the bulk of the volume off to make getting it on the wall easier, and the wood screws do a good job of combating twisting and bending of the fiberglass. The bases are made specific to volumes so there isn't a gap between the volume and the wall.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I will say that I hurt a finger and didn't climb for almost 8 months because it didn't get better and it wasn't until I said gently caress it and started regularly climbing real easy that it started to get better. Also if it hurts on slopers but not crimps it could be tendon sheath inflammation instead of a pulley injury? I've heard sheath inflammation is generally safe to climb on without risk of injury but I could be very very wrong?

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


gamera009 posted:

Speaking of safety in autolock: has anyone looked at the Mammut SmartAlpine (the double) versus a grigri? I heard the SmartAlpine double was fully auto-locking so you could actually let go and it'd lock/brake similarly to the grigri. Confirm/deny?

Deny. It adds a lot of friction when catching a fall but doesn't lock up to the same degree as a grigri. I find that with no hands holding a climber it will slowly creep rope through, though touching the rope will cause it to stop creeping. It certainly is noticeable when catching a lead fall when compared to an ATC though.

And just fyi grigris aren't autolocking, there are circumstances that will cause them to uncam and let rope through even when weighted.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Good video, imo lead belaying is harder with a grigri than with a plate device.

I used to hang stuff from a grigri1 on a fixed line and stopped when it dropped a bucket of holds after a bounce on the rope from a small fall. Something to do with the bounce unweighting the cam just enough to let it slip and for whatever reason the cam didn't have enough friction to re-engage. Lots of people treat grigris like they catch falls but they aren't that reliable without a hand on the brake strand. I use them as I would an ATC when TR belaying.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Ascenders are a pain when you are going up and down repeatedly. I use a grigri tied off for me and a placket device for my bucket these days.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Mmmmmm, I find it pretty easy to do a controlled a lower with a smart. I pull it down and away and it unlocks smoothly.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Sigmund Fraud posted:

Anyone bolting here? I'm looking to get my hands on relatively cheap A4 (AISL 316) expander bolts and hangers. They are too fing expensive here in Sweden...

Yes. What is your cost per bolt+hanger?

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


drat I think we get them at like <5 per, not that we do much bolting.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


I always wore my shoes in the shower if they really needed to stretch out before a trip or something. One time a friend blew out his shoes a day before we went on a week long trip so he slept in his shoes to get used to them and could hardly walk the first day.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


RabidWeasel posted:

I know it's not 100% safe hands off like some of the more mechanically assisted options out there

Even with a grigri or w/e don't take your hand off the brake.

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henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Samesies, though there are safe ways to use it as you described.

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