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Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Slightly odd question: I wear glasses. 98% of the time it's fine but occasionally they get in the way. I have contact lenses but wearing them to the gym seems like a terrible idea - the air has chalk dust in it, dust puffs off the holds, and if you do decide you need to take the lenses out then having mucky, dusty fingers is absolutely not what you want. Or am I worrying too much?

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Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Business of Ferrets posted:

How do they get in the way? If you're worried about them falling off, you can always get a strap to hold them on.

As for the contacts and chalk/other dust, can you give it a try and see if it's even an issue?
Sometimes when doing roped stuff the rope knocks them, which can be annoying. It's not a big deal, just very occasionally irritating.

quote:

I wear contacts climbing all the time and it's fine. I carry a little bottle of eye drops in case I ever get a bunch of chalk in there but I've never needed it.
Thanks, that's reassuring. Guess I'll give it a try. I was mainly worried because if it doesn't work then taking contacts out is something you want to do with properly clean hands, ideally, and the idea of heading over to the sink with an eyeful of chalk dust, spending a minute washing the crap off my hands and only THEN taking the painful contacts out doesn't fill me with joy, heh.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Fatkraken posted:

anyone here like watching climbing? The British bouldering champs are in my city again this year so I was thinking of swinging by on day 2, there were some seriously impressive moves last year, obvious even to a total non-bouldering casual climber like me
In Sheffield? I was thinking about it, not sure I can make it, though.

Random question: been trying a different set of routes at the gym for the past few weeks that focus heavily on fingers - either crimping small holds, two-finger pockets, or else grabbing big flat ones with a small ridge that you have to jam your fingers onto. I've managed to do about six or seven routes in the past two weeks or so, and make good progress on a few more. This morning I have slightly achey fingers. Not bad enough to stop me doing anything, and it's all of my three main fingers on each hand rather than one specifically, so I don't think it's a tendon injury (unless I've managed to injure all six at once). It's most noticeable if I really flex my fingers, as in trying to touch the pads of my palms with the pads of my fingers.

But I'm thinking I should 1) back off a bit and 2) focus on doing some gentle finger conditioning stuff once things have settled down. Anyone got any suggestions? Or am I worrying too much?

Zephro fucked around with this message at 14:06 on Jun 28, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


turevidar posted:

Sounds like standard tight / worked tendons. Are your fingers tender if you squeeze the first segment with your other hand?
Do you mean the segment nearest the knuckle? Yes, a little.

quote:

Stay off of the fingery climbs until you hands feel normal again. It's really, really easy to overdo it and finger injuries take a long time to heal. Rest + ice + ibuprofen.
Thanks, will do. Is there anything else I can do to toughen them up? Stretching, exercises, that kind of thing? Little reluctant to do any more hangboarding given what's happened, but maybe that would be useful in small doses?

Zephro fucked around with this message at 15:16 on Jun 28, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks for the info, both those posts are super useful. I've ordered some tape. I think I might avoid climbing for a week or so and see how I feel then. The middle finger on my right hand seems worst affected but it's fully functional and only really aches a little when I'm actively flexing it. So hopefully it's just a minor strain and it'll get better with some time off and a trip back to juggier holds for a while.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 22:06 on Jun 28, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Anyone got opinions / advice on weighted pullups? I can do ~14 or so bodyweight pullups with good form (ie no kipping, no only going halfway down per rep etc) unweighted. Are weighted ones going to get me anything apart from bigger lats? In other words will they actually be useful for climbing? Or am I better off focusing on other variants like unequal grips or towels or frenchies or whatever?

Zephro fucked around with this message at 09:12 on Jul 26, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


turevidar posted:

If you are worried about accidentally getting really huge and ripped, just don't eat a ton and keep your reps per set low (3-5) to develop strength - hypertrophy focused bodybuilding programs usually go in the 8 -12 rep range. Being strong is useful but it's not going to benefit your climbing as much as a more specific exercise. Pull ups are great if you want to be a well rounded human being or have time to spend on less efficient training. If you have limited time, climb or train lockoffs/power/contact strength etc.
It's not that. I don't have much time to climb and even less to train / do other exercise between job and family and commute, so I don't want to spend time doing things that aren't going to help. If more/heavier pullups aren't going to be of much benefit then I guess I'll start doing something else with that time instead.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 13:47 on Jul 26, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


OK, thanks for the advice, everyone. My bar is a door-mounted one so there isn't space to practise front levers, which is annoying, though I've been meaning to start trying at the gym's bars. I'll carry on with the weighted pullups for a month or so and see if I notice anything different on the wall :)

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks. Grip strength is one reason I was considering towels - there's a boulder route at the gym right now that I can't complete exactly because of grip strength, heh.

On finger strength: is there a good way to train it besides hangboarding? I'm a little wary. The gym has a couple of Beastmakers and I've had a couple of tries on the 1000, hanging from the four, three and two finger deep pockets for 5-10 seconds each, and then doing a couple more sets of the same, as well as specifically choosing some crimpy routes to try. Which seemed fine, but the next day I noticed some tenderness and pain in the first joint of several of my fingers, so I backed off. I've been told by others to be wary of hangboarding and campusing because it's really easy to tear/injure your tendons, and my experience kinda fuelled those worries.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 12:36 on Jul 27, 2016

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks, that's really helpful. The gym I use doesn't have any counterweights on its hangboards - how plausible is it to build and bring your own? I've seen people using various contraptions made out of what look like resistance bands, ropes and carabiners.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Got my first flapper today :toot:

I cut the skin off, washed it, and have wrapped it up, but how long (roughly) till I can climb on it again? It's right on the gripping part of the palm, just below my middle finger, and at the moment any pressure on it is pretty painful.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


OK, thanks. I'll see how it looks next week.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


So I'm going to be in Boston (the American Boston) in a week or so for a conference and I'm probably going to bring my climbing shoes. Can anyone recommend a good wall near Back Bay, which is where my hotel is? There seems to be a chain of walls called the Central Rock Gym but I can't get their website to work for some reason. Since it's just me going I'd probably stick to bouldering so I don't have to worry about finding a belay partner, so if there's a specialist bouldering gym, even better.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 09:23 on Feb 6, 2017

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks for the recommendations, everyone, and thanks Caf for the offer of a gust pass! I'll definitely let you know if I make it - not sure exactly how much free time I'm going to have at this conference but it'd be great to give it a try.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


My wall (the Arch in London, which is bouldering only) charges £10 a go, or 10 sessions for £75, or £400 for an annual membership. That gets you access to something like 35,000 sq ft of space spread across three venues (two of which are right next to each other in a fairly central location and one of which is way the hell out of the main city).

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Has anyone got any experience with climbing after an inguinal hernia repair? In theory you can go back to everything you were doing before by 6 weeks but I've seen people on various sites claiming it actually takes a lot longer than that. My doc insists that six weeks will be fine but I'm not sure he really knows what it's like to do roof routes or whatever.

I've also got some buddies organising a via ferrata trip to Italy 7.5 weeks after the op. Do I have any chance of going along? If it helps I'm 35 and reasonably strong and fit.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


crazycello posted:

The hernia healing thing is about avoiding activities that drastically increase your intra abdominal pressure, like a valsalva maneuver, ab exercises, or taking a strenuous poop. Gauge it based on what you think you'll be climbing, but I would think that unless you're cranking out strenuous roof boulder problems you should be fine.

No clue what the specific via ferrata is like, but the one I'm familiar with in the rockies would not be an issue that far out post op if you're under 50 and not obese.
Thanks, that's really helpful. Bouldering routes are exactly what I like doing, roofs included :( I guess I'll just take it really easy and stick to verticals and slabs for a while. Though I've heard that even raising your legs for a big step-up on a slab can be a PITA for a few months after the surgery.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


So I think I picked up my first ever pulley injury, lol. All the symptoms suggest it's an A2 pulley tweak on the middle finger of my left hand. I was pulling hard at a crappy angle, felt something twinge, it swelled up a bit, any kind of crimping hurt afterwards, and gently squeezing the A2 hurt too. No loud popping like you sometimes hear in videos though.

I've never had this before so I'm curious about recovery times. Especially since it seems to be getting better remarkably quickly. I tweaked it 5 days ago and it feels almost back to normal already - applying pressure no longer hurts, really heavy gripping hurts but only a tiny bit. At this rate it *feels* like I'll be ready to go back to easy climbing in a day or two, but I'm wondering if that's deceptive. Most of what I've read online suggests either no climbing or only very soft, open-hand stuff for 4-6 weeks even for a slight tear rather than a full rupture. Is it possible I've just stretched the pulley or something without actually tearing it at all? Or is it normal for it to feel healed way before it actually is?

Zephro fucked around with this message at 18:12 on May 28, 2019

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


OK, thanks. I guess it gives me a reason to finally start doing some proper core workouts instead (i hate core workouts)

Zephro fucked around with this message at 13:11 on May 29, 2019

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


George H.W. oval office posted:

Pickup “Self Coached Climber” I consider it to be like reading Starting Stength when first starting to lift. It’ll get you up to speed on all the necessary concepts of climbing
Is the book still applicable to someone who does 95% indoor bouldering, at least for now? I have ambitions to do more outdoor roped climbing but I have a family and a job and the countryside is flat for miles around so those ambitions are shelved for the next decade or so.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


edit: actually never mind, I think this is probably wrong

Zephro fucked around with this message at 14:30 on Jun 4, 2019

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


So I wanted to try to master muscle-ups (for fun, not necessarily for relevance to climbing though I guess they help with mantling a bit). I think I'd like to try using one of those Theraband type things to do assisted reps while I work up to a full-on muscleup. The therabands themselves seem like they're a little short and possibly not heavy enough to work wrapped around a pullup bar, though. Can anyone recommend some specific product that might do the trick?

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks. If there's a way to do it without gear, even better. The jumping muscle-ups sound like a good idea, I might try them. My local gym has a bunch of boxes that would be perfect for that.

I'm guessing the hardest bit is going to be the transition from a low jump to doing it from a dead-hang, though, right? It feels like even a small amount of momentum would make things dramatically easier.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Perfect, thank you.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


So I have a fairly big shed at home, two kids and a long commute (which means I don't get much time to go to the gym) and my girlfriend's brother is a carpenter. It's nearly Christmas.

So should I, thread? Should I pull the trigger? I work at home two days a week so could easily fit in at least a couple of lunchtime workouts a week, plus whatever I can manage on weekends, free evenings and so on. But I'd love to hear from anyone who has something set up at home about pros / cons, how useful you've found it, how much of a PITA the build process is, and so on. I'm pretty sure I would use it regularly, since it would fix the biggest problem I have, which is lack of time, not lack of enthusiasm. And if I did build something, the options seem to be 1) a Moon board, 2) a Tension board or 3) some kid of custom setup. Which would work best?

For what it's worth I climb around V5, at least in the gym. So I would be starting pretty much at the bottom end of the problem sets on either of the two standard boards, which seem to be designed for climbers who are quite a bit better than I am (and I know routes on the Moon board are supposed to be sandbagged anyway, so I really would be starting from the easiest routes). On the other hand, it's hard to make progress at the moment when I can only get to a gym once a week.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 12:05 on Dec 12, 2019

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


I bought a Beastmaker 1000 to see me through lockdown. It's great and I love it but - is there any way to break in the 35-degree slopers? On the used, beaten-up boards at the gym I can hang on them without any trouble. On my board, they're just too slippery to get any kind of purchase on. I don't think it's a strength issue, just a friction problem. I could attack them with sandpaper, I guess, but that feels a bit drastic.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 22:14 on Apr 30, 2021

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Sigmund Fraud posted:

You could
a) sand it lightly. It works but is not as good as those that get worn by normal use as that wears away the soft grain while leaving the hard year rings.
b) hang one arm on a deep pocket or the good sloper
c) use a sling or pulley. You can drill a small hole in the bottom of the bm and screw in an attachment point
d) use alcohol based chalk. It'll dry out the wood
e) no hang it with feet on something
f) try harder
g) front lever it a bit. It'll move your cog forward, making it easier. Bonus core work!
Thanks, and sorry to dredge this up after so long. I think I'll try sanding it a little. I guess it's a strength issue in some sense. But on the other hand I can hang on the 45 degree slopers on the 2000s at my local gym, so it feels like I ought to be able to manage 10 seconds on the 35s even on a fresh-ish board. But it's so slippery that I just slide right off. Beastmaker themselves say they should wear in after a while but I've had the board for a few months now and if it's happening, it's only very slowly.

Zephro fucked around with this message at 21:36 on May 26, 2021

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


I got used to it with test falls too. As you get more confidence you can throw yourself off deliberately and it will still catch you. I found knowing that really helps when you're pondering some tricky move 10 metres off the ground

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


I have a fingerboard above a doorway at home and I'm keen to add a pulley system to it. But my SO isn't keen on the idea of a pair of pulleys hanging permanently beneath the door, which is kind of fair enough.

Is there any particular reason why you need a multi-pulley setup? It seems to me you could get away with a single eyebolt that you run the rope directly through. Is there some reason that I'm missing as to why this wouldn't work? Obviously friction will be a bit more of a thing but it doesn't seem like it'd be a showstopper?

If there is I guess I'll just have to use the old-school feet-on-a-chair method.

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Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Thanks everyone for the pulley advice. I guess I could remount the board. Maybe that's the easiest way.

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