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Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


What's the next step after I can handle most v2s and am starting to hit v3s? At my gym, it's basically a transition from every type of hold to nothing but crimps and for the life of me I can't grab those. It sucks to plateau.

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Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I have some pretty awful pain at the top of my wrist whenever I release most jug holds with my right hand. The pain comes and gos pretty quickly but is a real bitch to deal with when I boulder. Any ideas?

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Diver Dick posted:

I have a climbing friend who is planning on taking a bucket list sort of trip to the Sierras in 2014-15, and he's left the door open for me to tag along. IIRC he climbs in the 5.11-12 range outdoors, and he's been active for years. His main target for the trip is a multi-pitch 5.10b with "lots of straight in finger jamming", with backpacking and camping at altitude. I can definitely handle the backpacking. I also have my own basic gear and screw around at bouldering walls and rock gyms a few times a year... but I've never been on anything worse than an exposed scramble outdoors. I'm used to being roped in and exposed to heights for work, but I have no real reference point for the difficulty involved here.

If I go for broke, switch up my training, invest in a hang board an keep cranking out pull ups... Is it even possible for me to get to that level of climbing in a year or two? Do I need to have some natural talent to climb that grade, or can I work my way up?

I'm actually in the same boat and would definitely like to know. I've got a really good strength base but I'm still managing only v2s/3s at the moment.

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


So, uh, wrist problems abound. I took a break from climbing and am trying to boulder v3 atm.

The problem remains where whenever I let go of a jug or block, there is a sharp pain that sort of lighting-bolts through the top of my wrist. Afterwards it radiates dull, minor pain for a couple of minutes and subsides. My wrists straight feel looser afterwards but I'm not sure why. Any thoughts?

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Covert Ops Wizard posted:

How long was your break? If it was only a couple weeks it wasn't long enough. Take a longer break, say no less than a month, maybe two, then start climbing not overhanging roped climbs for a few weeks. Ease back into climbing. Also a doctor might be a good person to go see.

Good advice. Doctor found the problem, some minor inflammation on the tendons because my gripping muscles are overdeveloped and my extending muscles are poo poo. It can be fixed and I can keep climbing as long as I ice it often.

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Taking everyone's advice at a different level. I treat climbing like sport training, so there are days I focus on technique and days I try to gas myself out.

jiggerypokery posted:

I don't want to sound like a sales guy but this DVD I have to recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...ham%2Caps%2C324 <- it's not perfect but this DVD is far far better than trying to interpret tonnes of second hand advice. It not only tells you the same stuff everyone else tells you but it shows you how to actually apply it to your climbing training, the order to apply and why you should. Climbing technique is all about the whole picture. Theres loads to it.

If someone tells you silent feet thats great, or strait arms save you energy (you americans seem to call that lock-off which as far as I know is precisely what you should not be doing!) thats all well and good by why? You want to boulder and these things are both to do with saving energy and preventing anaerobic systems kicking in. What Gresham does is explain to you how through decelerating your foot before making contact with the hold you can make contact then apply increasing pressure without momentum. Therefore you foot sticks better, you can weight it properly and you don't degrade your expensive boot rubber as fast. If you are doing it correctly it happens to be silent but silent isn't the point.

The second dvd is all about periodisation of training and stuff, its only useful if you want to be a total wod and come up with monthly training plans. Most people don't bother.

So don't lock off?

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Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Just a couple of butt shots from my first time climbing outdoors a couple of months ago:





The rock was so cold we filled our chalk bags with handwarmers and had to take way too often so they didn't go completely numb.

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