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jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

YourCreation posted:

My goal for the year is to enter a bouldering competition by the end of the year. I do not expect to do really well, just enter. I have The Self Coached Climber, 9 out of 10 climbers, and will be climbing at The Castle and Mile End in London. I have been indoor climbing at an amateur level for about a year now and have had some private instruction. I might do a few personal training and coaching sessions to mark progress. Following YLLS nutrition guide and doing lots of free weights in the gym to lose weight and gain some power. Wish me luck goonies.

Why not just enter one? I really don't see why you need to go through all that to enter a competition. You go through all that to improve your climbing, they are completely unrelated. You're not going to win your first comp. You can, however, do better in your second comp than you did in your first. Swallow your pride and take the plunge! That's the essence of climbing after all.

Just enter blocfest and spend your year making sure you do better next time!

http://www.blocfest.co.uk/p/entries.html

Remember the best climber is the one having the most fun!

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jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

.

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 18:14 on Mar 14, 2019

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

It happens. Having spotters is overrated anyways. They only have a function when there is an obsitcal that you need to be diverted from should you fall off (Another boulder, a poorly placed volume if you are indoors for example). In this situation you would probably have just him em in the face!

I'm glad you enjoyed my blog post. I'll try and post something weekly or so. Hopefully others can learn from what is working for me and what isn't as I go.

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 18:16 on Mar 30, 2013

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

I see what your saying but a large part (nearly all) the skill involved in spotting is identifying where and when it is nesiccary. At the end of the day the most serious indoor climbing injuries are often from climbers landing on each other. A small inconsequential fall for a climber of just a few feet is enough to paralyse someone they land on if they are standing in the wrong place. I'm definatly not saying don't spot indoors all I am saying is it's not a skill you 'practice' for use out doors. It's either nessicary in a given situation or it's not regardless of where you are. The skill is just identifying where.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

ultimatemike posted:

I actually got injured once because I was working on the lip of a bouldering problem and some fuckwit I didn't even know "spotted me" by just trying to loving catch me in his hands which ended up holding my knee in the air while the rest of me fell. Holy poo poo was I pissed.

That kind of thing happens all the time and it is precisely the problem with spotting.

AriTheDog posted:

So how are you supposed to learn to spot safely then? Or to learn when to spot?

Most walls make sure your aware of what it is when you join, or require you to do an induction with someone qualified. If a wall (gym in the USA) doesn't require you to sign a paper that says your competent with basic safty when someone joins they could be liable if that person causes injury and could potentially be sued. If a person lies about it when they sign the paper it's their problem.

In other words a more experienced climber should have taught a novice the principles before they should be allowed to boulder unsupervised indoors, and if you take less experienced climbers out with you it's your responsibility to ensure their competence.

Of course you can always just not get on problems that require it if your worried about it!

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.


Me too, best sport harness going. I don't use it for trad though because It's only got two gear loops. If you ever climb on gear having 4 or more really helps. I also have: http://www.sportsdirect.com/dmm-renegade-harness-788129 but I can't recommend one.

It has a adjustable waist line that kind of runs through the whole thing. It means you have to pay particular attention to where it is. Normal harnesses don't sit right if you have them too low or not done up correctly but the Renegade sits perfectly when it is way way too low. Call it good or bad design whatever you like but at the climbing wall I work I have to stop people and get them to adjust it more than any other harness by miles. (Partly due to them being so popular).

Same goes for any harness though. No one makes crap harnesses any more so just make sure it fits above your hips comfortably and your in.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Pander posted:

It's $50 for an hour of instruction for g/f and I together. Sound like a good deal, or should I instead read and keep practicing on my own?

An hour with a decent instructor will make your next three months miles more productive than they would have otherwise been. You'll get a good idea of technique to work on and you will see big gains. You wont climb 5.10 immediately after the session but it will definatly speed things along.

At the level your at the instruction you will require will actually be really generic and not nessicarily worth doing on a 1:2 coach - client ratio. You could save a fair bit of money booking on a 1:6 movement and technique course and still get just as much out of it or perhaps even more. You might get 2 hours for the same price for example.

I guess it depends what you want out of the session. If you want bang for buck join a movement and technique class, if you want a nice time with your girlfriend just go 1:2. Both will be good for your climbing.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

I can't climb at the moment due to the fact I am recovering from a knee op. Check my blog a page back for some ideas maybe. Anything you do to improve upper body and core strength will have a long term positive impact on your climbing. It won't make you climb better as you say, you need to climb to learn to apply your new found strength.

Number one thing you can work on is finger strength, but if you cant put a fingerboard up core is very important.

TRX is the best core workout gizmo out there at the moment, but if you don't want to buy one there is loads of good core stuff you can do with no equipment.

I have this app on my Iphone I use for ideas when I cant climb. Basically lots of core exercises that you don't need equipment for.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.leafcutterstudios.yayog&hl=en

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 08:33 on Apr 3, 2013

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Alex Megos just onsighted 9a this week.

Check his training vid! http://player.vimeo.com/video/24776832?color=01AAEA

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

PRADA SLUT posted:

I got a flapper on my left hand, right underneath my ring finger (where the finger connects to the hand). It was two days ago so it's healed a bit, but still there. What's the best way to tape it up so it doesn't get worse (like what directions would I go with tape, my tape always falls off and isn't effective)? I'm want to climb tonight and will try to avoid jugs with it.

Don't tape tear off any flapping skin and let it dry. Keep it clean but try to avoid getting it wet. Don't use plasters or any thing, the more air it gets the drier it will be and the quicker it will heal.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

Around v8 was when I noticed that my core wasn't very good, so I started doing a pretty nuts core routine to strengthen everything up

Check the TRX thread for the best core workouts going

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

They are all just fashionable trainers any ways. Just get whatever you think looks cool.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

I don't want to sound like a sales guy but this DVD I have to recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...ham%2Caps%2C324 <- it's not perfect but this DVD is far far better than trying to interpret tonnes of second hand advice. It not only tells you the same stuff everyone else tells you but it shows you how to actually apply it to your climbing training, the order to apply and why you should. Climbing technique is all about the whole picture. Theres loads to it.

If someone tells you silent feet thats great, or strait arms save you energy (you americans seem to call that lock-off which as far as I know is precisely what you should not be doing!) thats all well and good by why? You want to boulder and these things are both to do with saving energy and preventing anaerobic systems kicking in. What Gresham does is explain to you how through decelerating your foot before making contact with the hold you can make contact then apply increasing pressure without momentum. Therefore you foot sticks better, you can weight it properly and you don't degrade your expensive boot rubber as fast. If you are doing it correctly it happens to be silent but silent isn't the point.

The second dvd is all about periodisation of training and stuff, its only useful if you want to be a total wod and come up with monthly training plans. Most people don't bother.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Just got back from a 2 month trip to the Frankenjura! Holy poo poo that place is incredible!

I guess the lingering WW2 stigma makes Germany a never thought of trip destination here in the UK, no one talks about it. It is amazing though. 10k routes or something. The classics are polished but there is so much to do its unbelievable.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Don't spend a fortune on really expensive tight shoes though, until your footwork improves you will demolish shoes. See it as an incentive to work on it. Bad footwork is expensive!

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Seriously, those guys on Dawn Wall have been on El Cap since the 27th of December. How do they poop? I've never been big wall climbing and every option I can think of just sounds hideous.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Anyone been to Croatia late autumn? Wondering about places to go, conditions etc. Both sport and DWS

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

F0rcefedReality posted:

I really should get one of these. Actually I think the thick bar training is somewhat preparation for finger boarding. I know I'm not quite ready for some of those crazy holds yet but I've just started really focusing on my grip strength.

Starting finger boarding is fine even early on as long as you remember what it is for. You need to take it really easy (way easier than you think!) and don't start doing pull ups on it or anything. Your biceps and flexors respond to training far better than their respective tendons (and crucially pulley ligaments!) do which is why it is so common for people to get finger injuries or tennis elbow. Weight training exacerbates this as while you train your larger muscles are capable of exerting increasing amounts force far in excess what the weaker parts of the chain can cope with. Frustratingly these parts also take a poo poo load longer to recover.

By just hanging you limit the acceleration part of the force equation and reduce the risk of damaging something important. You don't even need to use bad holds for both hands. Start with one hand on a jug, the other on the grip type you are working on and slowly transfer your weight between them. That kind of thing. Pullups have very little to do with climbing capability anyway. Finger and core strength (if you have good technique) are much more important.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Right then thread I need core strength. Pretty sure that my ability to take weight off my arms on steeper terrain is my main weakness at the moment. Recommend me a workout or two (I boulder ~V8-9).

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Tactical Lesbian posted:

So as a newbie, under 1 month of climbing, is there anything wrong with just climbing like every day? Like 30-60 minutes over lunch time, and ~3 hours a day on weekends? Am I going too hard right out of the gate?

Get another hobby that you can't do every day. Running is good. Use one to rest from the other.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

I just finished my first (ever) hangboard program. Steve bechtals one month ladders. I sure got better at ladders! https://www.climbing.com/skills/training-hangboard-ladders-for-finger-strength/

I want to switch it up and do a repeater program next. Does anyone have a simple 4-6 weeks long or so program I can go at?

Disclaimer; I've been climbing a long time but never really trained so I can sit in the same room as a hangboard, sipping tea, occasionally glancing over at it and get way stronger at this stage.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Tippecanoe posted:

What kind of warm-up routines do y'all have? I used to just do a bunch of easy climbs but I'm getting a little tired of having painful hips, shoulders, fingers on the regular

I do the warmup section of the reddit BWF recommended routine before anything, always + a couple of handstands.

https://www.reddit.com/r/bodyweightfitness/wiki/kb/recommended_routine

My shoulders, hips, fingers love me for it. Only thing you need is a stretchy band (theraband or something similar).

Climbed my first hard trad route on sunday! E7! I've only done 1 E3 before so it was a huge leap up for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWxYZBX3Lgs
(Not me in the video, but this is the route)

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

The best pair of shoes are the pair that actually fit you. Same as buying a harness. You need to actually go into a shop and try them on, and try a lot of them on. If the shop doesn't have little footholds for you to try the shoes out on, go to a different shop. Lots of companies do boot demos at climbing walls now and then, they are worth scoping out too.

Eventually, you'll find a pair you absolutely love and you'll want to keep replacing. Even then, the sizes and even shape often vary slightly from production batch to production batch and you can still end up disappointed buying online.

https://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/skills/series/neil_gresham_technique_and_training/technique_-_choosing_your_footwear-10488

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

jet_dee posted:

Is it too soon to be doing this sort of training, and should I just be patient?

I've been climbing 8 years and still don't need to do that kind of training. You don't need to be patient, just do better things.

If you want to start 'training' start by having strength days and endurance days. It doesn't have to be more complicated than that.

On your strength days, if your climbing V2-3, find a couple of V5s and work them one move at a time. 5-6 goes per move, then try a different move (to prevent injury). This is Limit Bouldering.
On your 'endurance' days your interested in volume of quality moment. Go and do as many v2-3 as you can in up to 3 goes.
If you flash them, you have 2 more goes left on each to do them with better technique. These are Perfect Repeats.

Perfect Repeats and Limit Bouldering are drills that get you strong and good at rock climbing. Campusing gets you strong and bad at rock climbing. It's literally drilling poor technique, which some would argue is worse than not drilling at all.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Imo the fingerboard/hangboard should be used as an injury prevention tool while on the path to higher grades, rather than part of the path itself.

gamera009 posted:

I've found this to be a good system for workouts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEt35BKm2OI

4x4s are cool if you want/need to use a bouldering wall to train for routes. Daniel Woods does that because it's hard to find routes set indoors that are hard enough for him to train for the routes he wants to do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeHg5F5OJIw

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Yeah, exactly! And it's important to think of them in those terms, rather than finger strength being the passport to higher grades. It isn't, climbing better is. Correlation, causation etc

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 09:48 on Jun 21, 2018

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Kasumeat posted:

I'll also say I think the hanging contributed to being able climb pain-free, as I noticed the pain seemed to lessen significantly a few weeks after I started hanging.

Maybe. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean#Regression_fallacies

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

This is an unusually good run down of the basics of quickdraw technique.
https://www.climbing.com/skills/learn-to-climb-clipping-basics-for-sport-climbing/

On the Same Side clipping, I run the rope over my middle rather than index finger for some reason and always teach that. I couldn't tell you why exactly but I'm as fast at clipping as anyone so :shrug:
Maybe it's just one of those habits that doesn't matter at all, or maybe someone will notice and explain why I shouldn't one of these days?

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 14:31 on Jul 6, 2018

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

RabidWeasel posted:

The difficulty being that the problems are all set quite reachy and some short dynos - perhaps still primarily a problem with technique but I can't see huge room for improvement there other than trying to get maximum driving force from the lower body (which I'm already doing - obviously practice will improve) and improving positioning between moves. There's very little opportunity for clever poo poo like knee jams or heel/toe hooks (as far as I can see anyway - again maybe I just suck) which I usually use on horizontal problems to avoid the fact that I'm weak as gently caress. Having not really climbed on any overhangs of this incline and length before I'm surprised that it feels more difficult than going on similar holds on a horizontal roof - is this just lack of experience talking or is it actually generally considered to be more difficult?

You probably just don't have the repertoire of techniques that you actually need to make it happen. Clever poo poo is way more subtle than knee jams. . There's more to heels than outright hooks. Drop-knees are nearly always available when a route is steep.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkfUqdr-0zk

To this day, I pick one or some combination of the basic techniques each session and find every opportunity for them that I can in my warm ups. People totally over-rate strength and totally underrate the basics.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

In my experience of climbing injuries (and injury in general), the pain always persists until you work out what's wrong or at least do the right physio by brute force or sheer luck.
The best book on climbing injury by miles is http://www.davemacleod.com/shop/makeorbreak.html You may be able to find it cheaper from a US distributor.


Needlessly slapping for holds is normally how newer climbers get injured. Being strong doesn't really help because it means you can get away with bad technique.
A drill that helped me loads was to wave my hand a couple inches over every hold on a route/circuit for a second or two as I moved through it. You have to find the correct balanced body position to do this.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Lots of different injuries have really similar physio, which is convenient but then lots of different injuries also have really similar symptoms which can suck when the physio is at odds. I have a lot of pain in my left middle finger a1 pulley which is absolutely not a pulley problem, rather tightness in my left bicep that I can't seem to stretch out.

Bodies are weird, man.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

It's definitely implied you got to the top somehow if you dogged it, as opposed to if you bailed.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

.... are you my ex?

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

In the UK, no one abs (rappells) down a sport route with an insitu anchor point. We even call anchors 'lower offs'. Is it really normal to abseil of anchors to save wear on them in the USA?

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

how come?

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Got another sport climbing trip coming up in January. I wonder if we should start a little goon training program.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

My plan is to do loosely themed weeks with a rest/tapering week before the trip.

Join in if you like!

Each week is themed.

Week 1; Endurance
Week 2; Strength/Power
Week 3; Strength/Power
Week 4; Power Endurance
Week 5; Power Endurance
Week 6; Strength/Power
Week 7; Strength/Power
Week 8; Endurance
Week 9; Power Endurance
Week 10; Rest

I'll be hang boarding twice a week too, on the following program.

https://www.climbing.com/skills/training-hangboard-ladders-for-finger-strength/

Different grips though, open hand, three finger drag, slopes.

It's week 1 now, so tomorrow (Tuesday) I'm going to be doing endurance. This means time on the wall.
I'll warm up then aim to do 10 mins of continuous easy climbing round some circuits, resting as much as needed on the wall.
20 mins rest, then repeat for three sets.

I'll do the same on Thursday.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

meowmeowmeowmeow posted:


Like two month of endurance, a month of power, a month of power endurance, two weeks tapering deload

This is 18 weeks and would probably work better if I had that kind of time but I have 10 till my trip. I'll still target all 4 energy systems each week, a bouldering session in endurance week, for example, it just won't be the emphasis.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Being lighter is definitely better for climbing, but getting lighter is definitely worse for training and it's a poor trade off. A good training session > drilling bad, lazy habits because your hungry.

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jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Ubiquitus posted:

How do you come to the conclusion that being lighter is worse for training?

I didn't I said getting lighter is worse for training. Being on a calorie deficit makes it very hard to keep up quality and volume. Being lighter is bueno!


DrAlexanderTobacco posted:

It's true that it's difficult to *build* strength while cutting - but at the same time with a high enough protein intake it's perfectly possible to retain strength/muscle whilst shedding fat. This leads to you "feeling" stronger because you're lifting a lighter version of yourself - and climbing is all about that, plus endurance, rather than seeing your squat weight go up week-on-week.

If your losing weight for climbing specific reasons, I dunno how much you should care about retaining muscle mass. Recruitment is what really matters for climbing, and that's a property of the nervous system.


Business of Ferrets posted:

Did my first trad lead rope soloing today. Complete success!

What was the setup, roughly?

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