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Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



There weren't many videos and such posted in the last thread, so here are a couple of clips for your viewing pleasure. I can highly recommend Life On Hold by the way, great film about bouldering in the UK:

http://vimeo.com/46230928

http://vimeo.com/54315330

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Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

I quite like 'silent feet', where the aim is to place your feet as you climb without them making any noise, and not moving your foot once it is placed. This encourages precise, controlled first time foot placements, and will eventually become more habitual. It's easy enough to just do it for 20 minutes per session whilst you warm up.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

That's why I like going to the far north of scotland. Place is so dead you can walk for days without seeing anyone. So many boulder fields which have never been documented. Unfortunately the weather is terrible, and it is remote, so rescue is a bit of an issue if poo poo goes awry.

One of my friends did a font 7b highball by himself there. He plopped a mat down, put 999 predialled into the phone, and placed it next to the mat in case he fell. Luckily he managed it and showed us the film of it.

It takes a very dedicated soul to develop boulder problems in the highlands whilst battling the weather and the Scottish loving Midge simultaneously. I just cannot handle biting insects, they give me absolute hell.

modig posted:

Seriously? How is an 8a getting so much action that it wears out? I've climbed plenty of polished 5.9s, but I feel like a 13b just isn't going to get the traffic to be polished, since there are not that many people who can even climb it.

Lots of people sport climb at a pretty high level in continental Europe, and limestone polishes very easily. Lots of classic routes end up becoming polished and a bit grim, unfortunately.

Still B.A.E fucked around with this message at 23:44 on Jul 29, 2013

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



dr.gigolo posted:

I've only climbed outside once, and it was the same case then. We're going to Tahoe next month and I don't think either of us are ready to boulder outside. I ask because it seems a lot cheaper to boulder than climb outside, we don't have the equipment for climbing outside. When we went to Smith Rock, there were probably 2 dozen people in the group, plenty of quickdraws, ropes and lots of other stuff we don't have. I guess I'll stick to the gym for now, hopefully I can do some more climbing outside while the weather is still nice.

I dunno, I would say that if you have a pad and shoes and are not completely dumb you are probably 'ready' to boulder outside. It's not as if you have to pick out some highball at your limit above a gnarly talus landing, just go climb easy stuff with nice landings, have fun and get used to moving on rock.

E; I write this not knowing anything about the area you're going to, so if the bouldering around Tahoe is known for highballs and horrendous landings or something then yeah, maybe pick somewhere a bit more beginner friendly for your first time.

Still B.A.E fucked around with this message at 10:46 on Jul 30, 2013

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I fell about 5m and hit a rock through my pad. RIP my ankle.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Chris! posted:

Ouch, that sucks. Is it bad...?

Nah, just a sprain fortunately. Kind of annoying though as I'd only got to try two problems that day and there were loads of cool ones there. One to go back to, I guess.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



WYA posted:

You have ankle pads?

My bouldering pad

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Sigmund Fraud posted:


Where are you now skill-wise, what have you done recently to improve and what are your plans for the season?

In 2012 I was climbing around font 7b+/7c (v8/9), training hard and probably in the best shape of my life. I then lost pretty much all of 2013 to glandular fever and have regressed to mid font 6ish level (v4?). I'm still having issues with a bit of tiredness etc, but I seem to have just about found my balance in that respect.

The real issue so far has been a mental one. Falling from a level where I felt I was climbing better than ever and breaking through plateaus to feeling like I'm back to where I started has been very difficult to take, and for a while I lost all motivation for climbing.

I've just recently accepted that I'm going to be worse than I used to be and started climbing a lot again and it owns, so basically my immediate goals are just to suck it up and climb as much as possible, and try to be realistic and not get injured. Not looking at grades in the guidebook when I go out and just getting on lines that strike me has helped a lot too.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Watch Wide Boyz for free until the 7th of April. It's good: http://hotaches.com/free-climbing-film/

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Speaking as someone who rushed out and bought the self coached climber as soon as I got remotely interested in climbing, don't do this. Just climb for a bit and find out what your goals are. Also, SCC is very much focused on redpointing sport projects, and structuring your training for a specific point in the season. Whilst there is some good general info in there, there are better resources available for the vast majority of climbers.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



big scary monsters posted:

IMO Dave MacLeod's 9 out of 10 Climbers Make the Same Mistakes is the single best book to read if you want to improve as a climber.

Yeah, this. Good post.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Very Good UK bouldering film Life On Hold is currently (today only I think) free to rent here: http://steepedge.com/categories/bouldering/life-on-hold.html

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



coldfire07 posted:

Thanks for all of the responses everyone! I definitely agree that the time would be better spent climbing more (and strength isn't what's holding me back, it's definitely technique). I was just hoping to supplementally increase strength when I'm not at the gym, just by doing some hangs for a few seconds on the way to the bathroom or something like that, not as a replacement for climbing, kind of in the same way that I just squeeze putty when I'm watching TV. I'll just make sure to pay attention that I'm not overworking anything, but it's good to know it's not a hard and fast rule.

How often do you climb? If it's 2-3 times a week, I'd just keep the intensity of your climbing sessions high, and use the rest of the time to recover. Even if it's not that often, I wouldn't bother with a fingerboard yet. If you've been climbing for a couple of months, chances are you're still really poo poo at climbing (no offence, everyone is). Just let yourself keep improving by climbing a lot, and keep trying and falling off stuff.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I've tried to start an effort post in response to that a few times, but can't articulate it properly at the moment. It just sounds like a lot of really bad and confusing advice to me, and a way to maybe get strongish on plastic but be totally poo poo outside, and be a bit of a laughing stock.

Still B.A.E fucked around with this message at 01:14 on Dec 11, 2014

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I'll approach it in a slightly different way - in my opinion, the biggest issue with any sort of training for climbing is knowledge. There is a vast and ever growing pool of information and literature, and for someone new to the activity to assimilate this info, identify what they want to get out of their training, identify what they need to work on in the first place rather than what they want to work on, and put this into practice in a way that doesn't end up either ruining them or being less effective than 'just climbing' is pretty difficult.

It's easy to read some training info, identify a couple of useful sounding things, and implement them. Doing it in a way that is actually effective is another thing entirely. Say I'm a beginner who wants to work on their footwork, so I read up on it and decide to do 'silent feet', 'sticky feet', whatever. However, all I can climb is the easy stuff, so I end up being really good at standing on jugs and big blobby indoor holds without making any noise, often in a way that is unnecessarily awkward. Unless you understand what the desired outcome actually is in the context of your climbing, a lot of exercises are useless.

I have to confess that I've never read your mate's book, and maybe it does a good job of compiling existing training info, but so do a lot of other resources, and I bet its message conflicts with some of them, or at least would seem to, to someone new to the ideas.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Sharks Eat Bear posted:

So if you're deciding to hangboard, it shouldn't be in addition to your climbing gym sessions; it should be a substitute.

3) "You shouldn't start training early because you'll gain more by working on technique" is a totally misleading statement. Training can and should incorporate technique/skill development exercises, so the idea that you have to choose between technique and training is false.

This is the main thing I took issue with tbh. Advocating strength work on a fingerboard as a substitute to a climbing session on one hand, but saying training exercises should incorporate skill development on the other? You may say one session could be a strength session, and one could be a technique development session, but I really think for a beginner, it's much more beneficial to combine the two into two hard climbing sessions before separating them.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012




I didn't mean a laughing stock because they couldn't climb outside, more someone who has no clue what they're doing trying some assisted hangs off monos or whatever. I don't have a problem with people who don't climb outside, as long as they don't say stuff like 'I climb v10' cos they can do all the hard circuit at their local wall.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



As little dead space as possible anywhere in the shoe. Try on as many brands as you can get your hands on. In my experience, Scarpa are wide in the toebox, five ten and La sportiva less so, I've not tried many other brands. Some people love five ten, but I can't get on with the heel in most of their shoes, so don't get a shoe just because everyone else swears by it. Are you likely to climb outside much? What's the rock like near you? What type of climbing do you want to do? Stiffer shoes are better for edging, softer for smearing, generally. Leather will stretch more than synthetic uppers, but most shoes will stretch a little bit at least, so size with this in mind. Tighter shoes will likely perform better (if they fit), but you'll sacrifice some comfort, so bear that in mind if you want a shoe you can also wear for long routes outside, or just don't like taking your shoes off once you've put them on. Laces are generally more adjustable than slippers or Velcro, so you can tweak the fit a little more, but I personally prefer the convenience of Velcro or a slipper as I like to take my shoes off a lot.

Hope that was at least slightly helpful and not too stream of consciousness.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Those oxygyms look like they might be good wall shoes for a sweaty gently caress like me. I'd spend thousands on sportiva shoes if money was no object.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



20 dollars

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Dumbdog posted:

I pay about 90 for three months at the works. Then due to living in Sheffield I only climb outside for spring summer and autumn. I love Sheffield (capital of climbing in England pretty much)

as if the works is only 90 for 3 months, climb newcastle is like 140 ffs

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I've got a Petzl corax and I hate it. I'm 6'4 with a small waist, and there's just not enough room between the belt and leg loops. Should have got a bigger size I guess, but I just went off what the guy in the shop recommended as I'd only just started climbing at that point, and it was the best feeling of the ones they had. I would replace it, but I can't remember the last time I actually tied into a rope, so whatever. Oh and the gear loops are poo poo, too.

On the off chance I do get something else, any recommendations for tall + small waist? I've heard Edelrid can be quite good for that.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Chris! posted:

I'm looking to buy some new climbing shoes,

Try some scarpa vapours, scarpa shoes tend to be quite wide and by all accounts they're a great all round technical shoe.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012




Just go old school with the bolting and have runouts of like 10m between each one.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I've got a pair of miura VS in UK 7.5 (street shoe UK 10), and a pair of miura laces in UK 8. Now they're broken in a bit the VS are easily the best shoes I've had, can put incredible power down through the toe, super precise. The laces are fine for all day wear at half a size bigger, but they're also a less aggressive shape.

I'm with you though, gently caress laces, all my lace up shoes are being phased out and replaced by velcro and slippers.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



benwards posted:

I have stupid-wide feet, and la sportiva miuras are the best fit I've found.

That's crazy. I wear them specifically because they're narrow, and previous pairs of scarpas were all too wide.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



toiletbrush posted:

So last night while doing a move open handing from a tiny crimp my forearm went all twangy and a pain shot down from my ring finger to my elbow. I went home straight away, but apart from a dull ache for a couple of hours, the pain went away pretty quickly and there was no swelling or redness. This morning, doing pretty much anything with it feels ok, as long as my pinky is either fully engaged or out straight - anything else and any tension on the tip of my ring finger really hurts deep in my forearm. I'm off to the docs to get it looked at, but does anyone else have experience with this?

Flexor unit strain (tendons in your forearm controlling finger flexion). You should be able to climb more or less normally, maybe after a few days off and some ibuprofen, just avoiding any open handing with your pinky dropped (front 3 or middle 2). I'd suggest taping your ring finger and pinky together to stop your pinky moving into a dropped position, but crimping should still be fine. Unfortunately, they take loving ages to heal. I did the same thing maybe a couple of years ago, and am only just feeling confident enough to pull on pockets with my middle 2.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I'm not so sure on the mechanics of it myself, but I generally found that pinky in line with ring finger = fine. Obviously go by feel, if you get that uncomfortable pulling feeling from your ring finger at any point, hold the hold in a different way or go and do something else.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I agree that 30 days total rest seems a bit much, active recovery and progressive loading is now thought to be better for tendon recovery, aligning scar tissue in the right direction and all that poo poo, Dave MacLeod bangs that drum pretty hard in his book, make or break.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Chris! posted:

"Wild Country crack school",

Yeah these are really good videos. Also cool pictures, I bet that was well fun.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Chris! posted:

It was great! If you're in the UK, I think they do those classes semi-regularly around different locations, so look out for it. Really good value.

In other news, I'm going on a 3 week climbing holiday, leaving tomorrow, and my beautifully broken in La Sportiva Miuras got a split in the toe box last night. I've bought a new pair but really don't fancy the thought of having to break them in on an actual extended climbing trip... haven't got much choice, I'm wearing them around the office today!

Is the split on the inside edge of the shoe, next to the big toe? Both mine and my mate's split there, kinda poo poo.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



With mine it wasn't so much them wearing through, just the sole splitting from the rand, which isn't that big a deal,but kind of compromises the edging ability. My miura laces are just my trad shoes though, so I'm not too bummed about it. It has reached the point now though where I need two new pairs of shoes at once. I'm not very happy about that.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I've been doing the shoulder exercises from this article recently, plus some stuff for my elbows and wrists, as my body just doesn't like to play nice with hard training. Dedicating at least one session a week to just this antagonist/stability work. Seems to be going alright.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



loving hell, I just watched that video. Crazy ROM in those shoulders.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



F0rcefedReality posted:

I'm an intermediate climber who is mostly lifts weights who is interested in getting better specifically at bouldering (there's a bouldering gym next to my house). I've starting looking for ways to get better at climbing in the time I'm not actually at the climbing gym and in my backyard, where I have a pullup bar and I've come upon thick bar training using my new fat gripz. I'm really noticing my grip being worked really hard as well as activating my forearms a lot more than regular pullups. How much transfer am I going to get with doing thick bar pullups?

What are some more things I can do to become a better climber outside of the wall? I have access to pullup/dip station, barbell+plates, dumbbells, and a flat to incline adjustable bench.

If there's a bouldering gym next to your house, why are you doing pullups in your back yard to try to get better at climbing? Cost of gym entrance?

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Dmitry Sharafutdinov trained for (and won) the world championships by doing 20,000 pullups a month on a bar and fingerboard, you should totally do that.

(Don't do that, unless you have the elbows of a god)

You should get a fingerboard though, it will at least keep you ticking over when you can't climb, and will help you improve if you use it right.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



RabidWeasel posted:


If someone could suggest something I could try to improve more quickly or just make me feel like I'm not sucking horribly then that would be nice

It seems like you're a bit conflicted about what you want to achieve, you say you need stronger fingers etc but then talk about failing when leading routes cos you're pumped. If you actually want to get stronger fingers, just do a lot of steep fingery bouldering - trying and failing a lot, and doing lots of the type of hard moves you say you're failing on on the cruxes of routes.

It sounds like part of the issue is just being nervous about leading, not even necessarily about falling, but just that you associate it with getting pumped and being miserable and flustered. If that's the case, I'd suggest knocking down the difficulty and just leading a ton of routes of say 5-6a until things like clipping start to come more naturally and you feel more comfortable above a bolt.

As well as this, you should look into doing some form of specific endurance training if you really want to improve your sport climbing, whether that's building a base of fitness by doing aerobic capacity work (long periods, like 20-40 minutes at a time of continuous easy climbing, never getting above a very mild pump, although I appreciate that this is quite difficult to do if you don't have access to a circuit board and don't have that much room to lower the grade anyway).

Alternatively, you could try to work power endurance, which may help you push through hard sections when you're pumped. Look up something like 4x4 bouldering circuits for that. It does feel like really hard work though.

What sort of training facilities do you have access to? Does your gym have a bouldering wall or just routes? Is there a dedicated circuit board, etc?

E: in before that guy tells you to buy the Anderson brothers book

Still B.A.E fucked around with this message at 10:16 on Oct 21, 2015

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



I'd go for sportiva pythons over solutions for indoor climbing. Get them small though, they stretch a lot.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



People who still use pof should be made to eat it.

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Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



stoicheian posted:

What are euro feet? Don't google image search "euro feet."

From gamera's description, i'd guess he means where your heel extends back significantly further than the back of your ankle/your Achilles tendon, so a deep heel cup would fit you better.

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