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asur
Dec 28, 2012


guppy posted:

While I'm sure it's fun to be smarmy, this is a misstatement of the issue. You're still using the tools provided on the route, and only those tools. People skip holds further up the route all the time.

It's not equivalent to skipping a hold though, it's more like using a hold that's not on your route as the ground also isn't on the route.

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asur
Dec 28, 2012


Caf posted:

Thanks for this.

The comp wasn't point based, it was strictly elimination. Finish five problems in the first round (probably V0-V1) to make it to round two. Finish five problems in the second round (V0-V3) to make it to the elimination round. We got three falls to start the elimination round and three more after completing the third problem.

I made it to the elimination round (which was my goal) but due to the unluck of the random draw ended up being the second climber. The first problem was easy but the climber ahead of me had trouble on the second so when I sent it on my attempt I became first in line for the rest. Wasted one fall each on problems three and four (it really was tough going first without the benefit of learning from someone else's attempt). I fell three times on the crux of problem five and when I nailed it on my last try the entire gym started yelling and it felt awesome. Finally eliminated at the crux of problem six but man, that was so much fun.

I can't wait to do it again.

I've never been to a bouldering competition and only watched the Bouldering World Cup, but at least in that they gave all the climbers time at the start to see the problem and then moved them to an area where they couldn't see the problem or the current person's attempts. Is this unusual or only applicable to top level events? Seeing another person attempt a problem when you have limited attempts seems like it would give you a huge advantage such that unless there is a large skill gap the people going first are almost guaranteed to not win.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Colonel J posted:

I'm very interested in starting this sport and have been once to check out a local bouldering gym (Shakti Rock Gym in Montreal if anyone goes). It's a cool place and I'm buying shoes tonight with the intent of going back. I'm going to take a one hour lesson soon with friends but everyone's busy now so in the meantime I want to go by myself.

I did a few V0's and wanted to try a V1 but I was confused with the layout on the wall. I know the taped V's indicate the difficulty and the place for your hands, but sometimes it only showed 1 hand, or I didn't really know where to place my feet as there were no similar colors at the bottom. Basically some colors/markings seemed to be missing. When it happens is it just a "do whatever works" kinda thing?

Are they any feet? Some routes are in the V0/V1 range, otherwise I think it's more likely that you don't understand what the setter wants you to do rather than missing tape. Climbers are generally a friendly bunch, so if you have trouble just ask someone else on the wall. One starting handhold generally means you start with both hands matching on it, if you can't match then one hand on it and the other hand on the wall/balance and start from there.

edit: Just as a note, it's not that difficult to start a route with no feet if you have decent handholds so if this was just one route then I would think that would be likely.

asur fucked around with this message at 23:32 on Mar 9, 2014

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Speleothing posted:

They're the fixed anchors, the top of the climb.

You clip quickdraws into them, just like any other bolt. Except that when you're done on that route, you can use them to rappel without leaving any gear behind.

To further clarify, the difference is that when lowering someone the rope moves resulting in wear on whatever piece of gear is carrying the load, whereas when rappelling the rope doesn't move at all and thus there is no/minimal wear. Picture below of an anchor that with a lot of wear presumably from lowering.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Additional pro won't help that much, you have to place it, assuming you can even do so, and there are still going to be spots where you'll deck. This is just something you have to get over climbing outside. Stick clipping can help, but in most cases just isn't necessary. In general while climbing outside you need to be aware of what will happen if you fall and have an escape Plan if you aren't confident in the move.

I also think you have a misconceptions about gym lead climbing. If you fall at the second or third clip, especially if you're attempting to clip, chances are high that you'll either deck or hit your belayer.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Ravenfood posted:

Not clothes-chat, but has anyone been bouldering at the Sportrock in Alexandria, VA? How is it?

It's pretty good. Relatively large bouldering area for a gym that has both bouldering and top rope. I don't go that often, but every time I've been the majority of the problems I've done were interesting. I'm not sure how common it is since I haven't seen it any of the other gyms I've been to, but they set routes 'E' routes, which are easier than a V0, which is nice if someone wants to come how doesn't climb often or has never climbed as some people will either struggle on V0s or just not be able to climb that many.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


At least from the pictures they don't look very aggressive and I think at V4 and higher you'd definitely see the benefits by going for a more aggressive shoe. I've also heard of the strapping system breaking on the Solution and those have a similar system though the band looks thicker.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Al-Saqr posted:

I am interested in doing indoor rock climbing as a sport a friend has been hyping it up to me, so I have a couple of questions:-

1- is it a legit good way to burn calories? I'm currently running 3 miles four days a week and dieting, and I'm looking to add something that would work and burn my muscles as well, does this do the job?

2- will this cause numbness and pain to my hands/fingers beyond normal fatigue? I am an artist, and I had a bad experience with boxing where every time I would end the session my hands would shake uncontrollably for a few hours afterwards and I wouldn't be able to draw for half a day, does the same thing happen with rock climbing?

I know these are simplistic questions I just haven't found good answers elsewhere.

Thanks

1 - It's ok. The activity itself burns a lot of calories, more than running from estimates I've seen, however it's not efficient from a time perspective as you only climb between 25% to 50% of the time when you're in the gym. It's still not bad, but if you're trying to replace days of running then you'll need to spend at least 2x the time to do. As a note I haven't had any problems doing both.

2 - I don't think so. I've never boxed, but I've never had an issue with my hands shaking from climbing. You'll definitely feel your forearms get pumped, but it goes away pretty quickly.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


www.amazon.com posted:

as far as package deals. I see this
http://www.rei.com/product/880934/black-diamond-momentum-climbing-harness-package-mens black diamond momentum package

Then I look on the black diamond website and see they have what they call the momentum ds harness available as a package or just harness:
http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/climbing-harnesses/momentum-ds-combo-BD651064_cfg.html#start=13 Momentum DS combo package http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/product_Black-Diamond-Momentum-DS-Combo_10235667_10208_10000001_-1_ just because black diamond doesn't have the smaller size in stock.
http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/climbing-harnesses/momentum-ds-harness-BD651065_cfg.html#start=14 Momentum DS just harness

edit again;
guess I have a thousand questions. I see this momentum SA harness from black diamond as a package. can anyone tell me what are the real differences between these options.
http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/climbing-harnesses/momentum-sa-harness-package-BD651041_cfg.html

The big differences between harnesses are comfort and stuff related to the gear loops, none of which really matters if you don't trad lead or multi pitch. You want something that fits well and isn't uncomfortable to wear, but in the gym or on single pitch you don't hang in your harness for any significant period of time. I'd recommend that you get the BD package as it's cheap and a pretty good harness that is relative comfortable and has easy access to the belt loops for gear. At some point in the future you may want to upgrade, but I'd wait till that point and just go with the cheap option now.

You didn't ask about shoes, but I'd recommend the same approach. Buy a cheap shoe that fits well as you'll beat the poo poo out of it as a beginner and then once you're more experienced you can decide on the type of shoe(s) that you want.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


I had a MadRocks shoe that they don't seem to make anymore, but it was like the a laced Drifter. I think it was $60 at REI. The Tarantulace seems like a good shoe, but you can probably find a cheaper shoe if you look around. I'd personally avoid Evolv as everyone I know that has bought their shoes has complained about them smelling and then not had problems when switching to another brand. I've never bough synthetic so maybe someone else can comment on the stretch for them, but if you buy a leather shoe expect it to stretch between half to a full size, which means it needs to be really tight when you try it on.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


armorer posted:

I don't know that anyone here can give you a solid answer on this, but - probably, yeah. Figure that in a crimped position, all of your fingers are hooked like that and your hand in general is a lot "stiffer". If you pop off a hold like that, it is more of a sudden violent thing. From my experience, popping off an open hand crimp is more of a slide and feels less traumatic to my fingers. That one finger may be getting the same strain in an open hand or crimped position, hard to say really, but on the whole the open hand position should still be easier on your fingers.

I think the issue in general is less about popping off the hold and instead that your hyper extending and highly loading your fingers in a crimp.

"Rock climbers are often using the unique crimp grip position to hold small ledges. Thereby the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints are flexed about 90° and the distal interphalangeal joints are hyperextended maximally. During this position of the finger joints bowstringing of the flexor tendon is applying very high load to the flexor tendon pulleys and can cause injuries and overuse syndromes. The objective of this study was to investigate bowstringing and forces during crimp grip position. Two devices were built to measure the force and the distance of bowstringing and one device to measure forces at the fingertip. All measurements of 16 fingers of four subjects were made in vivo. The largest amount of bowstringing was caused by the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in the crimp grip position being less using slope grip position (PIP joint extended). During a warm-up, the distance of bowstringing over the distal edge of the A2 pulley increased by 0.6 mm (30%) and was loaded about 3 times the force applied at the fingertip during crimp grip position. Load up to 116 N was measured over the A2 pulley. Increase of force in one finger holds by the quadriga effect was shown using crimp and slope grip position."

Schweizer, Andreas. "Biomechanical properties of the crimp grip position in rock climbers." Journal of biomechanics 34.2 (2001): 217-223.

"The present work displayed the first quantitative data of forces acting on tendons and pulleys during specific sport-climbing grip techniques. A three-dimensional static biomechanical model was used to estimate finger muscle tendon and pulley forces during the “slope” and the “crimp” grip. In the slope grip the finger joints are flexed, and in the crimp grip the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint is hyperextended while the other joints are flexed. The tendons of the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis (FDP and FDS), the extensor digitorum communis (EDC), the ulnar and radial interosseus (UI and RI), the lumbrical muscle (LU) and two annular pulleys (A2 and A4) were considered in the model.

For the crimp grip in equilibrium conditions, a passive moment for the DIP joint was taken into account in the biomechanical model. This moment was quantified by relating the FDP intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) to the DIP joint external moment. Its intensity was estimated at a quarter of the external moment. The involvement of this parameter in the moment equilibrium equation for the DIP joint is thus essential. The FDP-to-FDS tendon-force ratio was 1.75:1 in the crimp grip and 0.88:1 in the slope grip. This result showed that the FDP was the prime finger flexor in the crimp grip, whereas the tendon tensions were equally distributed between the FDP and FDS tendons in the slope grip. The forces acting on the pulleys were 36 times lower for A2 in the slope grip than in the crimp grip, while the forces acting on A4 were 4 times lower. This current work provides both an experimental procedure and a biomechanical model that allows estimation of tendon tensions and pulley forces crucial for the knowledge about finger injuries in sport climbing."

Vigouroux, Laurent, et al. "Estimation of finger muscle tendon tensions and pulley forces during specific sport-climbing grip techniques." Journal of biomechanics 39.14 (2006): 2583-2592.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


CoasterMaster posted:

Jesus. I've been leading in the gym for a few months (and outside twice) and this still scares the poo poo out of me. I totally trust my partner, but just knowing that I'm a few moves above the last draw freaks me out and I just get inside my own head. I know it's just something I have to get over though. Any tips for being more comfortable leading? It's gotten to the point where I don't want to push myself because I'm (somewhat irrationally?) freaked about a fall. That being said, when a whipper does happen, the worst I've gotten is some shaking from all the adrenaline. :)

edit: I can also tell that my hands get extra sweaty when leading which makes my grip not feel as good, creating a nice endless cycle. :)

If the issue is falling, then you can train it like anything else. Go to the gym and take falls starting with small ones and progressing as you feel more comfortable until you're not freaked out about it anymore.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Tots posted:

Can anyone give me a brief rundown of what I should be looking to buy if I want to top rope outdoors? I'd probably be mainly anchoring on to trees. I went a week ago with a dude and I think the only equipment he really used to anchor was a dynamic rope, a static rope, and two carabiners. Now I'm looking around online and there's all kinds of equipment suggested for top roping and I'm feeling a little overwhelmed.

Any suggestions?

After reading around on various forums for the past hour or so, I think I'm going to hold off on the equipment for a bit. The general consensus seems to be that I'll know what I need once I understand enough about climbing to know what I need.

Are you climbing outdoors with people other than the one time or can you take a class? The advice you found is assuming you have some way to learning. If someone is setting up an anchor, then ask questions and watch what they do.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Scarpa Vapours are good, pretty similar to the Miura. I'm not certain either fits the criteria of being able to wear all day without going insane unless you size up though.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


I sent mine to http://www.yosemitebum.com/ and have had no complaints.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


RabidWeasel posted:

To put it in more detail, the problem I have is this: I need to clip, while doing this I need to have one hand off of the wall for a while. Doing this usually makes my active hand and wrist feel like poo poo, even on relatively good holds, and on some routes I will be feeling weak and unable to grip properly after just a few clips. Sometimes I can position myself where this isn't a problem but I'm not good at being able to judge when this is possible. If I'm feeling totally hosed a short rope rest will always sort things out for the next clip or two but then I need to rest again.

Conversely I can toprope crimpy routes in my grade range well without resting so finger strength doesn't seem to be the real issue, it's more like I have issues with keeping a single hand clenched while supporting my weight, and I don't have the ability to quickly recover afterwards without a full rope rest or extremely generous (i.e. no hands) rest on the wall.


I was thinking about this during the day and came to the same conclusion - especially since I feel noticably worse on lead now than I did a prior to my break. The wall I climb at has a real lack of nontrivial routes which I can lead comfortably, and my regular warmup routine already includes most of them - I don't particularly want to spend a whole evening climbing just 4 routes if I can help it. Like you said, I don't really feel nervous about falling but I associate lead climbing with getting pissed off and making stupid mistakes and climbing sloppily. I don't have an intuitive sense of when is a good time to clip early and when it's better to keep climbing, I've tried learning by observing but I think that trying to do poo poo that doesn't suit my level of fitness is actually part of what has caused this problem in the first place.


The gym I use the most has a bouldering wall + routes but nothing else, they are currently expanding their training facilities which should hopefully be done before Christmas so I'm kind of excited about that. Endurance seems to have become a problem for me - which I'm surprised about since I have only been increasing the amount of time I spend climbing. Most of my favourite routes on the climbing wall are on a shorter section of wall, not specifically because they're shorter but because the shape of the wall (overhanging start into a vertical second half) lends itself to routes that I find fun and interesting, the taller walls tend to be straight at the bottom and overhanging and/or inclined higher up. I guess this might have resulted in inadvertantly training specifically for shorter routes but I still spend the majority of my time on the long walls so it feels like a bit of a stretch.


I've actually been climbing for coming up to 2 years now (bought my first pair of shoes in Jan '14 and started before then) but was doing so casually, max 1x per week until earlier this year when I decided to try to get better. I always have lots of fun but this is the first time when I feel like I'm having to choose between enjoying myself and improving and it sucks.

Thanks for the replies everyone! I'm not as down on this whole thing as I probably sounded but it's been bothering me and I wanted to vent.

By being unable to clip after a few clips, do you mean pumped? What you described with clipping, which is basically pure endurance, and the relatively large difference between your bouldering grade and sport grade seem to indicate an endurance issue. If you normally switch off every route with a partner then this isn't really surprising as endurance training requires being on the wall for 20+ minutes which pretty much doesn't happen unless you practice traverses a lot or explicitly set out to do so.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Awkward Davies posted:

What do you mean when you say "a 15 foot v4 boulder problem"? I was watching one the IFSC comps, and they referred to a section of the route as "boulder-y" and I couldn't figure out why.

He just means that there is a 15 foot section that is about a v4 in difficulty. As Sharks Eat Bear touched on, one of the biggest differences between indoor and outdoor is the difficulty over the route. In both cases you'll have a crux, but indoors the the difficulty over the route will be relatively constant both due to the size of the wall and that it's less fun to climb routes that are easy with one or two hard moves at the grade. Outdoors it's common for the difficulty of the route to vary significantly and thus when describing a route giving the overall grade doesn't tell you very much so people will break the route down and use bouldering grades to give the difficulty for certain sections.

The bouldery thing makes very little sense, but as someone mentioned generally just means that the section requires strength as opposed to technical skill.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


If the hold to the left is on as a foot then your hips, and probably core, should be facing left and then to move to the next hold, move your core pushing with your right foot. Starting should look something like this. If the hold to the left isn't on or available then you can do the same thing leaving your left foot flagged out. Starting in a squat facing the wall is generally not a great position as it force your core away from the wall, but if the handholds are good you can push with your feet while keeping your arms straight and move up in an arc. As turevidar said, you generally want to keep your hips and core close to the wall and instead of pulling try to push with your feet. Keeping your hips close to wall involves twisting at the torso to face the hips away from the wall and allow you to bend your knees otherwise bending your knees will force your hips away from the wall.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


www.amazon.com posted:

I'm starting to feel really comfortable with 5.9 level climbs. flashed a 5.10 today so I need to finally try some more of those. feels like im atleast ready to try out lead climbing. is there a consensus. The gym says they recomend being comfortable with 5.9 before doing the lead climbing class and getting into that ish.

I reccomending leading as soon as possible. The only reason I can think of to limit it is if the gym doesn't set lead routes at lower difficulty.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Tots posted:

Attention DMV climbing goons, I made a space on Slack for climbers to get together around the various climbing spots of the DMV (also for daytrip planning). Let me know if you want to get in on it and I'll shoot you an invite.

I'll take an invite. I've been looking for more people to climb outdoors with since I got back to the area.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Troysfalling posted:

Is anyone on here from Italy? I will be heading there in 3 days and was hoping to head out to the Dolomites to do a little climbing. Unfortunately the people I'm going with do not climb. So I guess i'm looking to see if I can meet up with anyone anytime Oct 8-21

You can hire a guide if you can't find anyone. It's a little pricy, I think I paid around $250 per day, but well worth it if you don't have another option.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Buy the cheapest shoes you can find that fit. You are almost certainly going to trash them while learning how to climb so expensive shoes are a waste of money.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Rime posted:

Need some advice for this year:

My climbing partner keeps insisting I take a trad climbing course and refuses to let me trad climb anything above 5.7 until I do so, which has become somewhat offensive. I do not need to take a course, courses are for yuppies with more money than time / effort, I am perfectly happy with my copies of John Long / Craig Luebben and long hours spent practicing placement. I own my own rack, it is not his gear.

I'm really getting annoyed by his super-paranoid approach to climbing which results in very little fun and a whole lot of time spent loving around doing 10m 5.6 routes, and not even a half dozen in a full day at best. With my other partner unwilling to even lead on sport, I feel that I am being held back. Last summer I went out with another friend and quickly rocketed from 10a sport lead up to 10d clean, just due to the difference in atmosphere, but he's moved back east.

Am I being unreasonable, or should I just ditch my friends and find climbing partners who are interested in actually pushing boundaries instead of incessantly fiddling around? :(

I think you need to find a partner who's approach to climbing aligns with yours. With that said, i do think you're missing the point in the first paragraph. When you climb you take on a joint responsibility and if he's not comfortable taking on that responsibility then he shouldn't be participating in that climb. It's not about letting you do something. I would press him for this actual concerns. If it's just taking the class then that's dumb.

asur fucked around with this message at 19:09 on Feb 14, 2017

asur
Dec 28, 2012


enraged_camel posted:

It's not that losing weight makes me a worse climber. It's about my energy levels. I last maybe 45 minutes at the gym when I'm on a calorie deficit, and I can't do as many routes because I run out of energy fast. But when I'm at maintenance or higher, I can last 90 minutes easily, sometimes longer.

So yeah, my rate of improvement definitely goes down considerably when I'm losing weight, since I can't do nearly as many routes.

I've been climbing since August, fwiw.

Eat at maintenance, or a little below, on climbing days and go on a calorie deficit the other days. That should be something like 2/3 of your week on a deficit and you can still lose weight.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Sizing down only really matters for aggressive shoes so if you don't get one of those I'd pick whatever is reasonably comfortable after it's stretched out.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Isn't Freeblast a 5.11? I havent climbed it, but going off Mountain Project two of the pitches are 5.8 and 5.9 and then the rest are 5.10 and 5.11.

I've always though simul climbing without pro seemed reckless as you're doubling your chance of getting ripped off the wall, but ive never heard of anyone unroping probably because it defeats the point of saving time.

I'd be curious to know if people setting speed records try to keep a piece of gear between them or not? At 2 hours up the Nose it seems pretty likely that they skip a bunch of placements to save time.

asur fucked around with this message at 16:37 on Jun 11, 2018

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Mokelumne Trekka posted:

Not being paranoid while rappelling down a rockwall outdoors has been a bit of a psychological obstacle for me. Absolute trust in a system of friction devices, a harness, rope and an anchor is so different from trusting your own hands and feet!

Is anyone aware of the failure rate in harnesses and how soon to buy a new one? :tinfoil:

Gear failure, not the anchor system (tying rope around a large boulder or tree eliminates feelings of insecurity) is my greatest fear on rappell, as that to me is hard to predict. Product quality and death is separated by a thin red line, so says my worried self.

It's pretty much impossible for your harness to fail under the low dynamic load during a rappel. If your willing to climb with a harness, and thus potentially take a fall on it, you shouldn't be worried about rappelling with it.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


The vast majority of sport routes are intentionally bolted for standard lengh quick draws. I personally wouldn't buy or carry slings unless there is a specific reason to do so. For the same reason I'd avoid buying very many if any different length quick draws as in my experience it's more likely to either be equivalent to the standard length or end up in a bad position than help.

Best option would be to talk to people that climb where you plan to and find out what's needed, but barring that I'd buy standard gear. 10 draws also seems on the low side, but is dependent on where you climb.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


armorer posted:

I'm going out to Red Rock Canyon in a few weeks with a buddy of mine who really only has a year or so of outdoor climbing under his belt. He's good on sport lead into the 10s, and can follow on trad. He wants to get on some big mulitpitch routes, but I'm wary of the short days and time loss to gear management every pitch.

I'm going to run him up solar slab to get a sense of timing, and birdland if that goes well. Any other suggestions? I did epinephrine with a skilled buddy last year and it took us all day, so I'm likely to skip that one this time unless we're unexpectedly flying up stuff. (And even then I'd start it a few hours before sunrise.)

Frogland, Crimson Chrysalis, Tunnel Vision.

I would also recommend the book route below solar slab, it's fun and is an intro to chimneys though don't believe any bs about it being equal in difficulty to Epinephrine.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


ShaneB posted:

Any core programs for climbers anyone can suggest? I mean I know i can find something pretty easily out there, just looking for anything anyone can vouch for. My lack of core strength is not helping me.

I wouldn't call this a program per say, but I do planks, side planks, variants of dead bugs, pikes, atomic pushups, saws, and oblique crunches. You can up the difficulty with either a bosu or a trx. I've felt that core strength is less about specific exercise and more about putting the time in and making sure you're engaging your core and not using other muscles.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Ubiquitus posted:

Are straight leg deadlifts considered as difficult as regular deadlifts for those with poor form? Those require much less 'proper' form than regular deadlifts, and cover all the same muscle groups.

Personally I haven't done a regular deadlift in years, and I'm much happier and climbing stronger than ever.

Squat sets of 5-3-1 are also good for posterior chain, for those who dont have poor form.

I don't think they are any less difficult, but they do shift more focus on the hamstring.

I'd be concerned that poor form on the standard deadlift would translate to poor form on the straight legged version given that there is less feedback on where to stop.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


prom candy posted:

Any idea if this thing is good for golfers/climbers elbow (inside elbow pain instead of outside pain)

I found Dr. Julian Saunder's advice to work for me. The recommendation is to use a dumbell. I have a FlexBar and was kind of meh on it.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Sab669 posted:

Arghghghghghg just spent 2 hours on that same problem, tried a few different betas, including flagging as one of you suggested, and none worked :( A few other people did it tonight, each one doing it differently.



Eventually I found if I toe-hook that hold where my hands are here, I can match on that upper hold. But then I can't quite get my right arm up to the next hold (out of frame), and then there's 1 final hold after that. If I had another week I know I can do it, but it resets on Tuesday. At least no one can say I didn't give it everything I've got, though. gently caress I'm going to be dead tomorrow.

The intended sequence looks to be two hands on the high jugs to the right with your left hand on the lower jug, move your left foot onto either chip on the same face, left hip into the wall and flag your right foot. You then reach for the left top hold with your left hand by extending your left leg and keeping your right arm relatively straight. It's a little difficult to know the next move as the hold is out of frame, but if it's up and right you can either reach it by twisting your torso into the wall or move your feet up, right foot to the chip or jug and left foot to the chip. Up and left would probably be similar to the previous move.

Also if you can I'd try to break reaching with your strong hand if it's not the correct hand for the move. That will end up punishing you in the long run.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


armorer posted:

Anyone familiar with outdoor climbing areas in the DC metro area? Ideally to the west in northern VA?

I'm going to take my 10 year old niece out to climb some real rocks. Doesn't need to be big but needs to have stuff in the 5.5 to 5.8 range. Trad, sport, or TR from whatever set up are fine.

I'm a fan of Elizabeth Furnace as it's pretty much the only sport in the area with climbs from 5.6 - 5.10 though it's a bit of a trek if you're not west of DC. Great Falls is on the other side of the river from Carderock and dependent on where you live may be way faster to get to than Carderock. Like Carderock it's pretty much all TR with some trad thrown in that very few people do. It's more spreadout and less crowded with a longer approach.

@Jester: Yes, either go climb sport for 2 weeks in the gym or do 4x4s bouldering.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Sigmund Fraud posted:

Too much time infront of the computer, not enough time doing pushups. Forward rotated shoulders and muscle imbalance is kinda the norm for climbers tho so at least you're in good company.

I'm confused here. Climbers should have stronger back and lats than normal which would help pull their shoulders back. Pushups would counter this climber imbalance, but seems like they'd exacerbate forward rotated shoulders.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


On Terra Firma posted:

I might need some shoe advice too. Been climbing around 2 months and I'm getting through about half of the V3s in my gym after a few attempts. I tried on the Scarpa Instinct VS tonight. I wear a 13 in my evolv defys but they feel a bit loose after climbing in them 3-4 times. The Scarpas were juuuuust comfortable enough to stand in without any pain and I felt like they encompassed my whole foot much better. I did get that shoe farting sound thing though. Do they stretch much at all? I was trying a 46 but I'm wondering if ordering a 45.5 might be worth it.

The reason I'm even considering new shoes this early on is that I just do not trust the defys. I had a few guys from my gym watch my footwork and they said everything was fine (Mostly people climbing around V6 and above) but man I just feel like I can't get a good hold with the defys at all.

Aggressive shoes should not be comfortable to stand in and a half size down for any climbing shoe is probably too large nevermind an aggressive shoe. Instincts do stretch so I'd try a 44 and a 44.5

It sounds like your trying to avoid fixing the actual issue though which is not trusting your feet. I find it hard to believe that the defy is not an adequate shoe for climbing in the V3 range.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Slimy Hog posted:

Counterpoint: wear shoes that fit and don't hurt.

I'd argue that the perfect fit for rock climbing is going to be uncomfortable in aggressive shoes, but it probably doesn't matter to most people. The bigger issue is that a lot of shoes stretch a huge amount such that you need to size down to something uncomfortable to get a decent fit post stretch.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


TheDon01 posted:

Is there a reason to get anything besides wiregate quickdraws these days?

From what I can tell/have read the wiregates are usually the same price, less prone to opening when struck/jostled, are stronger and can be easier to clip?

What am I missing about solid gate 'biner quickdraws?

When clipping into a bolt, there's potential for the notched nose or a recess near the nose to get caught on the bolt and when loaded in that position the carabiner is considerably weaker, as can be seen in this DMM video. Catching the notched nose is entirely avoidable, if you're paying attention, but catching a recess is not and is something I'd reccomending looking out for in all carabiners or draws that are intended for use with bolts. Both are these problems aren't neccessarily unique to wiregates and various manufactures like Wild Country have products that have neither issue like the Heliums, but theytend to show up in lower priced versions. On the other side, wiregates do flutter less than solid gates so that's a minor plus.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


The general fit of the shoe and the toe is much more important than the heel. As long as your foot doesn't move in general the shoe is workable and if it doesnt move when you heel hook then there's no issue regardless of it making a sound.

Leather shoes with less rubber around the heel will break in as well. A lot of shoes cover the entire heel though so watch out for that.

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asur
Dec 28, 2012


On Terra Firma posted:

Other shoes my heels slip out if I point my toes down. The shoes I've tried so far: Sportiva Skwama, Otaki, Miura vs, Scarpa Vapor Vs, instinct VS, Veloce, Butora Acro wide and narrow, Narshe, and one other model I can't remember. Evolv defy and shaman. I tried on a few so ill shoes too but can't remember the names.

I gave Otakis a try last night and I could not climb in them because they were so painful on my toes. Like nearly bringing tears to my eyes levels of pain. Skwamas hold my heel in place the best but the material around my ankle digs into my achilles. Scarpa Veloces feel the best overall in the forfoot but the heel slips if I try to hook in them and I don't think I can size down any more than I have given it probably won't stretch. I feel like I'm losing my mind.

The ankle of a Skwama will stretch a little, though I'm not certain what you mean by digging into your achilles. If it's even remotely tolerable I'd probably try that.

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