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modig
Aug 20, 2002



So basically a pebbley wall next to a waterfall above a pool? Sounds pretty sweet.

edit: Could be fun to have a year end climbing thread photo roundup... 1 each. My rear end-shot contribution, me on the Edge of Time.

modig fucked around with this message at 18:20 on Dec 22, 2012

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modig
Aug 20, 2002


Petey posted:

What's the best way to buy new shoes? My climbing buddy told me he just orders anything promising off Zappos and then returns the rest. Anyone else have other ideas, trusted brands, state of the art suggestions, etc?

If your technique sucks, try finding routes that work on your weaknesses and take away your strengths!

I have always just gone into a store and tried on shoes until I had a pair a I liked. If you do that, you should buy it at the store, even if it costs a bit more, consider is paying for the opportunity to try on shoes.

One thing I did recently in terms of working on my weaknesses... I flashed two problems that were kind of hard but not crazy for me. Then I watched some random guy climb them both way differently than I had. So then I climbed them again, using his beta instead of mine.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


I hit up Hangar 18 in Upland, which is in LA somewhere. It's not as nice a Movement, but it was a fine gym. The routes were harder for the same grade, though I'm not fully sure why. There were more routes that had reachy enough moves that my wife needed intermediate foot holds that weren't there. The holds are older and more worn out (smooth), and they often paint them to make enough holds of the same color to set a route without tape. Painting them seems like a bad idea to me. I managed to send a V4 that was pretty sweet, with more work and more dynamic moves than a V6 normally takes me at Movement. I'll go back for another day of vacation workout.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Thanks for the riverside tip, not sure we'll drive the extra 30 minutes, but it does look nicer. I think either tape or solid color holds work fine (Movement now does both), but paint seems like it's going to make the holds get slippery faster. Also with solid color holds it helps a lot when they are clean and fresh so the color is easy to see, and a lot of the routes at the upland gym had color that were hard to see. Mostly I think its just what you are used to. I'm just happy to have a decent gym so I can workout a bit on vacation.

Good luck with grad school.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

Don't suppose anyone knows of outdoor places to climb/boulder in or around Texas? I am from the UK and meeting a client in the states in a few months and thought might take a few extra days off to climb whilst I am there. I tend to climb in the F7c/5.13a if the climb suits me, and on a good day I will send a V8. In reality though the grade doesn't matter, just wondering what it's like around there but I have heard it is pretty flat so anywhere that is a day drive away would be nice as well.

You might bet better localer recommendations, but I think Hueco Tanks is in Texas and it is definitely one of the premiere bouldering destinations in the US. They only allow a limited number of people into the area per day, so look it up and plan ahead.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Pander posted:

Is this a common climbing injury? I'm wondering if it's an injured ligament in the big toe or something like that, maybe from last summer when I'd climb a LOT (maybe I over-stressed it during a climb sometime, or if my shoes are too tight on the toe).

I have something like this, I have to wear very stiff climbing shoes (basically a board under my foot) or else my right big toe hurts a lot. I can feel it sometimes in normal shoes if I put a lot of force on the toe, but it mostly doesn't bother me outside climbing. The injury came from jiu-jitsu, I was thrown off someone and basically landed on my big toe curled under me, and must have pulled something, but the x-ray said it wasn't broken.

Also who knows what brand this glove is? I bought the pair in Germany, we weren't able to do the via-ferrata I was going to use them on because the gondola was closed due to snow, and I lost the left before I got back to the US. So I never actually used the gloves, but they seem amazing...

modig
Aug 20, 2002


JustAnother Fat Guy posted:

That's a mountain equipment glove. I quite like their stuff, I put them up there with Arc'teryx as the best outdoorswear stuff. Have used their stuff extensively on hikes, climbs in the alps and climbs in the high Himalayas.

Thanks. I found their website and the exact glove model, maybe I'll look for a us distributor.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


FiestaDePantalones posted:

Is there some kind of grading system that gyms use for bouldering? I'm completely confused by what I'm seeing at the gym I went to, and don't speak the same language as the locals, so I wasn't even really able to ask what was going on.

There is no widespread gym specific system that I know of. In the US gyms generally use V grades, just like for outdoor boulders. In Europe I suspect they use whatever they call the 6a style of grading often. But it's not uncommon for a gym to make up their own grading system for Bouldering, and it is a lot more common than for roped climbs. In Boulder the Spot uses a system of dots from 1-5... I think everything V7 and harder is graded as 5+. I've seen places that just do "easy, medium, hard" as the entire spectrum. Generally if you can see some number or letter or symbol, bigger or more = harder.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Pander posted:

12 year old pair of AB&F khakis. Long, loose, and very tough. Paint splotches, getting white with chalk dust, and my cat's taken to sleeping in them when I leave them out so there's plenty of cat hair.



they're my favorites.

(I seriously need to get some pranas)

I had a pair of American Eagle Field Khakis I loved climbing in until I wore the rear end through. Now I just climb in anything thats not denim. I can definitely say that jeans + alpine harness is a horrible horrible idea for gym roped climbing.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Frown Town posted:

I'm going to be in Boulder, CO Monday and Tuesday for a job interview and will have a little bit of free time Monday night to do whatever. I'm probably going to go to a climbing gym and boulder -- The Spot has been recommended to me, but I was wondering if there were any other gyms with nice bouldering walls I should check out?
I'm staying at the St Julien and will have a rental car to use.

I'd go to the Spot or Movement for bouldering. The Spot has more, but last time I was there their main floor needed to be replaced. Movement also has a meetup group or something like that on weekday nights if you wanted to rope up I think.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


My chalk bag has a zippered pocket that I keep a role of tape in. I think you could fit some keys and a credit card or something.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Got an indoor V7 boulder problem I've been working on for a 3-4 climbing days, I'm pretty happy about it. For Movement goons its the pink tape with the big red sphere are the end.

armorer posted:

Does anyone use one and have any advice for me? I am planning to put 10 pounds in it and climb with that for a few weeks before adding any weight. The last thing I want to do is injure myself by getting overzealous.
My worry with the weight vest would be increasing the chance of a tendon injury if you blow your feet on a crimpy hold. So if you use it, I would focus on climbing in control. If you blow your feet, just fall, don't try to catch all that weight, especially on smaller holds. You could also start climbing two routes in a row as another way to work on the physical side of things.

modig fucked around with this message at 03:00 on Mar 5, 2013

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

When was that? I managed that one and the pink V6 to the left of it.

I'll probably be at Movement tomorrow night if you're going to be there for additional GOON CLIMBING.

I sent the V6 two different ways, then couldn't repeat it yesterday at lunch, which is when I climbed the 7. Today doesn't work for me but I can do nights even tho I usually climb at lunch.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


henne posted:

Are there any other setters in here that have some good blogs/articles on setting mechanics and movement analysis? Trying to get better at setting specific movement that isn't body type specific and get a better understanding of the mechanics of climbing and how climbing really works. Stuff like routecrafting.

Probably not quite what you want, but a girl I used to climb with write a the Spot setting blog. She writes alot about competitions, and some about setting. http://spotsettingblog.wordpress.com/

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Claes Oldenburger posted:

Smaller areas to actually grip as well as less holds in general. I'm working on foot placement because as a 6' 135 pound guy I am immediately reaching to lift myself up and in doing so wasting lots of energy.

A nice exercise for this is try to climb something like a 5.7 (generally just not as hard as you can handle, so it will move up as yo move up) without bending your elbows. It limits what you can do with your arms, and forces you to focus more on the rest of your body.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Manstrocity posted:

A guy who worked at my old gym would do boulder circuits with his arms wrapped in cardboard to keep him honest about not bending them 'bows. It was more weird than hilarious, but he's a better climber than I am so what do I know.
I saw someone recently climbing while holding a fist sized ball in each hand.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Fanzay posted:

I need a new harness, does anyone have any reccomendations?

I have one of these: http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-hirundos-harness-mens and am a big fan.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


jiggerypokery posted:

Me too, best sport harness going. I don't use it for trad though because It's only got two gear loops. If you ever climb on gear having 4 or more really helps. I also have: http://www.sportsdirect.com/dmm-renegade-harness-788129 but I can't recommend one.

I think I got confused about which Petzl harness I have because I forgot the name, and the Hirundos has nearly identical colors to mine. I actually have a Petzl Sama (http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-sama-harness-mens-ptz0190). It has 4 gear loops, and otherwise looks just like the other one. Maybe it's a bit heavier? Not sure. I think Petzl's harnesses aren't super differentiated.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Speleothing posted:

Get the Adjama instead, adjustable leg loops are absolutely the best and it's otherwise the same. Though I personally am a fan of BD's Aspect.

I actually went with the Sama just to not have adjustable leg loops. I like the elastic, and I've never had a situation where my harness didn't fit fine. When do you actually adjust the loops?

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Baldbeard posted:

Blaming shoes for poor technique is definitely done way too much by newer climbers, but I feel like shoes do make a bigger difference than what I've been reading here. I find it very difficult to hold a heel-hook in a newer pair of shoes I bought on problems where I have zero issue with on my older pair. The newer shoe however has a way more aggressive arch and I can snipe footchips significantly easier. There's a guy who goes to my gym that regularly does V8 & V9, and he brings several pairs of shoes and mix/matches them to see what feels best on his main project. Literally a different shoe on each foot.

It's like crying about chalk, or a hold needing to be brushed in the gym. Those things are rarely the culprit of why you can't finish the route, but they do make vast differences to many people.

V8/9 is beyond my current levels, so I can't comment on myself at that level. But I do know I've seen a video of a guy climbing some hard outdoor problem with one shoe and one bare foot, since apparently the bare foot works better on one hold.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

Funny thing! I went home, ordered up a Black Diamond Half Dome and then gave myself a concussion!
Kickass helmet.

Had a nice day at the Elephant Buttresses on Sunday. We were a bit confused because the 3rd butress is closed, but the sign said nothing abut the 4th. So we walked in along the river to the 4th, climbed the Northwest Face (5.8). It's a pretty cool route, for being so close, it feel more adventure in the sense that the route-finding is kinda hard. Then we setup a top rope on the 2nd Buttress and climbed the two 5.9s there. Classic Finger is ok, but Tough Situation is really cool. It's a hand crack in a dihedral, that starts with a roof, and looks overhanging at time, but is easier than it looks. It was kind of tricky to setup up the anchors for comfortable belays from above, so it took longer than it should have.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


I'll try to actually make one of these goon climbs this year. We'll see.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Last weekend I went up to Greyrock in Poudre Canyon, kind of near Fort Collins. First off, its really far from Boulder, its 2+ hours of driving, then 60-75 minutes to the climbing. So that wasn't awesome. But the rock was solid, and there are tons of moderate trad route there. A lot of them are kind of run out, at least the ones we did. There is a free guide book pdf online, but it's not super accurate since the bolt wars seem to still exist at Greyrock. We were planning to climb a 7 and a 9 that were supposed to be bolted. The 7 had all 14 bolts removed to revert to a 7-X. Seriously, in first 40 feet I think you could get one lovely piece of gear in about 15 feet up. The 9 apparently has 4 bolts left, which all seemed to be in the first 15 feet, though it is supposed to protect ok with gear. I think there are probably 100+ rocks on Grey Rock, though many aren't in Mountain Project.

We only saw one other set of climbers, and they were free soloing up probably 4th-really easy 5th class terrain. I've never done any soloing, and even I would have soloed what they were doing. So that looked pretty fun too.

You can camp right below the rock, which is pretty tempting. I think it would make for an awesome weekend or 3-day weekend trip. The one problem is that there isn't water very close the the camping, I haven't looked around carefully, but just on the trail we took in you'd have to walk 50-70% of the way back down to get to water.

The hike in is kind of cool, since it's right on the edge of a fire zone from a few years ago, so you get to see lots of different levels of forest and fire damage.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

Calling Boulder/Denver climbing goons to meet up at Bowling Alley Sunday morning.

Going to try to hit the rock by 9am. I'll be the one wearing sweet Belay Specs.

Expect super business casual sport.

Unless someone feels like flashing through A Tall Cool One (not me).

I can probably make that.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Thanks for the invite, it was pretty sweet to fit in 3 pitches where I wasn't planning to get any.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

But did you manage to fit in Iron Man 3? And was it worth bailing on additional pitches? we left after you did

Yeah I just didn't fit in a shower. I'll just have to go back.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


azreal posted:

I'm going to have to catch one of these Denver area meets (after buy some gear). It'd have to be on one that isn't overly challenging, though... I am in pretty good shape, but I am inexperienced at climbing.

If you mention before hand I someone (like me) can probably bring gear for you aside from shoes. Or you can swap harnesses/helmet with someone.

modig fucked around with this message at 00:47 on Jun 5, 2013

modig
Aug 20, 2002


spwrozek posted:

I do and pretty much everyone I climb with does.

I wear one most of the time. Sometimes I'll take it off in heavily cleaned, low rockfall sport areas, but not always.

I climbed Femp today up at Lumpy. We went to Lumpy since the forecast for boulder was hot as poo poo. It was still high 70s up at Lumpy and the sun was killer. Despite my sunscreen I'm burned all over, including the back of my right hand. Femp was pretty sweet, but it was pretty drat hard. I lead the easiest pitch (5.5?), then followed the others (5.9). You know that feeling after you pull through the hard parts and it feels like all the adrenaline has left your body, and now you have to rest after every move in 5.4 terrain. I got that at the top of both the harder pitches, and it last all the way back to the car. So all in all, pretty good day aside from the sun burns. Also there is a water fountain like .6 miles from the trailhead, and it was cold and it was loving awesome. I probably should have brought more than 2 liters of water.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


alnilam posted:

Tree climbing with rope is super fun. A little risky on a dying tree, but it looks like it turned out fine.

There are some crazy ascension techniques in the tree climbing world - I had a lot of fun learning about them, and if you already know rope pretty well from rock climbing, it's not hard to learn.

I know some rescuers who do the tree rope stuff for fun, so at vertical practice they would build a harness and ascender out of the end of a rope, and use that to ascend the same rope. Pretty cool.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Cybor Tap posted:

Hey Colorado crew.

I'm gonna be out in Denver on June 17th. Possible climbing sesh?

edit: actually I think I'm back by then.

modig fucked around with this message at 03:44 on Jun 11, 2013

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Sleepstupid posted:

Trip report: Didn't wear socks . Didn't contract any horrible foot smells/diseases .

Unless its one of those diseases with like a 10 year gestation period.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


spandexcajun posted:

I would love to go out and do more someday, those guys do some crazy stuff. Any canyoneers in this thread?
Your trip sounds sweet. I've gone canyoneering once, and would love to do more.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Any Boulder goons want to get out on Sunday?

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

Modig and I went up to upper satellites. Super fun. Super uncharted.

Super "I suck at climbing" session.

Good times.

I'll post pics soon.

edit:

Alas, the only really good picture:



P1020287 by , on Flickr

One of the many ways we tried and failed on that problem.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

This is verbatim what our discussion was and then we tried the problem.

Laughter and crying ensued.

edit: I like that Modig called this problem a V3 when some other climbers stopped by.

Every problem is V3, because the parts I can do are about V3, and I can't rate the parts I can't do.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Claes Oldenburger posted:

I knew it was going to be fun but WOW. I did a 5.8ish and a 5.9ish (I'm currently at 5.10- in the gym) as well as a crack climb (proper term?) and absolutely loved it. I didn't do the taping hands and jamming them into the crack thing but it was still fun nonetheless. It has really given me a whole new thing to strive for when I go to the gym.

Your lingo was solid, glad you had fun.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


spandexcajun posted:



In other news I climbed the 1st flatiron. I lead the first pitch of 5 and on the second pitch it started raining like a mother fucker. Not a little drizzle, a full on downpour. We thought of trying to bail but decided to just go for it.

Going into your story I thought you were this guy. I'm glad you weren't that guy.

Yall should strive to avoid being that guy, unless you really and in a bad situation, then definitely call rescue, but try not to get into horrible situations.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Pander posted:

I've tried bouldering a few times, and I guess due to inexperience and lack of dynamic strength I couldn't do a whole hell of a lot beyond the easiest stuff.
But it didn't seem crazy different from the sport climbing I do, especially for routes that have nasty overhangs. So I guess I'm just curious as to why people would opt to boulder over trad/sport climb given the (again, assumed) greater risk of injury.
Bouldering is a different experience, it is more social than other forms of climbing, and it is more focused on difficulty and problem solving. Bouldering is better for solo sessions, and is a great way to improve your sport/trad climbing. I don't know the stats, but my experience is that tendon injuries are more likely bouldering, and probably ankle injuries as well. But I think you would be surprised by how safe it ends up being, and you always have the ability to stop climbing before you get higher, which gives you a lot of control over the danger.

I think if you look at rescue stats (http://www.rockymountainrescue.org/Climbing_Rescues_Causes_Injuries_Trends_Boulder.php), bouldering accounts for 7% of rescues in Boulder county. Some confounding factors are popularity (more people=more injuries independent of risk level), and maybe ease of self rescue (bouldering areas are often right off of nice trails, especially around Boulder).



tldr; bouldering = fun and is probably less dangerous than you think, but certainly has real risks

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

Spent the morning with spwrozek at Cascade Crag.

Super relaxed.







P1020319 by , on Flickr

Not shown afterwards: Avery beer and food at the tap room and discussing the perils of snowboarding.

I just looked that place up, gamera knows how to rock the buisness casual climbing for real.

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modig
Aug 20, 2002


Kylaer posted:

I've been climbing for several years now, off and on. More off than on, though recently I've been keeping a good schedule of getting to the rock gym once or twice a week, and I've finally broken through the 5.10 mark and have succeeded on a couple of these routes. Still nothing approaching consistency at that level, of course, but it's great fun.

What I'm curious about is the integration of climbing with weightlifting, specifically about how to space my lifting/climbing days for best results. Would three days of weights, two days of climbing, and two days of rest per week (with a little cardio like short-distance bike rides being an every-day thing, as well) be a good split? I'm guessing that this topic has already been written about, but I don't know where I would find it.

At the 5.10 level, just climbing is going to be the best training for climbing. I don't mean that you shouldn't weight lift. If you like weight lifting do it. But I wouldn't focus on it as a path to improve climbing. If you are cycling your weight lifting by body area, you might try putting the upper body lifting right before a rest day, and in general try to avoid upper body followed by climbing or the other way around. I'm guessing those would be the most likely to interact.

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