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Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Baldbeard posted:

Man, I've hit a pretty serious plateau and I'm feeling pretty discouraged. I've been climbing for 9 months now, and I can do most of the V5s and some of the V6s in my gym, but I've been at this level for a while now. I can't seem to get the V6 grade on lockdown, especially cave routes. After progressing so quickly and then stopping, feels like I'm at a dead-end and I have to lose weight or magically grow 3 inches or something.

I need some sort of mindset change. Starting to think 'progressing' is more important to me than 'climbing' which can't be good.

You've only been climbing 9 months. Just give it time. Switch it up for a while, give your fingers time to catch up, and you'll come back stronger.

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Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Recycle Bin posted:

Thanks for the replies re: flagging and drop knee. I had a pretty good climb last night. I exhausted myself from hanging too long, trying to figure out what to do with my feet, but it felt great when I managed to get my body in the perfect position to reach the next hold with minimal effort.

Just keep doing this. There's no guaranteed formula for when one will work better than the other. The only way to learn is to try both repeatedly and eventually you'll start to get an eye for it. Even if you think something won't work, try it just to be sure. It's amazing how often you'll come down from a climb and say "Wow, I can't believe that worked!"

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Are you sure they're blisters and not callouses? When you hold slopers, you hit the hold then your fingers drag down slightly, causing the skin to bunch up at certain spots. If you do it enough, you'll notice that spot turn kinda white and rough (and maybe tender), which might be what you're talking about? If so, that's totally normal. Just climb until it's too painful to ignore, then move onto something else. When you come back the next time, your skin will be tougher and can handle a little more.

Re: Miuras vs Solutions: Solutions on overhung, Miuras on flat/slab. Both are great shoes. I have a pair of each for different situations.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

guppy posted:

My shoes are synthetic. What's a good way to keep them from being stinky? I already air them out after climbing but that's starting to be insufficient.

I spray mine with a little Lysol and put a dryer sheet in them every couple of uses, which holds off the smell for a while. You'll want to wash them eventually, though.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

If you're looking for something aggressive, Amazon has Five Ten Blackwings and Arrowheads for $70-80 each. I think they're just getting rid of last year's models, rather than it being Black Friday, but still a good deal.

Anyone have any recommendations for a comfortable baselayer/thermal for climbing? Going to be in Smith/Bishop a lot this Winter and will be climbing in the 20's frequently. Was thinking something like this? Anyone have any suggestions?

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

modig posted:

Can't got wrong with an R1 Hoody. It's comfy as a base or over a light t-shirt. Doesn't really fit over a long sleeve shirt. Won't help with wind. Fit's under other things really well since it's a snug fit, but stretchy so it moves with you.

I'm also a fan of this, which is closer to what you linked, though lighter.

I already have a BD Access Hoody for midlayer, but these look good. I'll keep them in mind in the future. Was more looking for baselayers for warmth in very cold conditions (high of 21 in Smith next weekend...), so grabbed a top and bottom Arc Teryx Phase SV. Hopefully now I won't freeze to death. Thanks for the suggestions!

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

2014: Shooting for 200+ days of climbing (about 4 per week). Never go longer than 4 days in a row without climbing (regardless of circumstances). Generic grade+1 goals.

Just re-hung my hangboard after 6 months in storage. Time to train again.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Kylaer posted:

When you're climbing multiple times a week, is it normal for your fingers to develop consistent pain if they've been immobile for any time? When I first wake up, the first movements of my fingers will be extremely painful until I've stretched them a bit. Is this alright, or is it a sign I'm doing too much and am injuring myself?

I don't only climb, I also lift weights, but I didn't have these pains back when climbing was a weekly thing instead of two or three times a week.

Only you can really answer this for yourself. Generally, discomfort is an ok/good thing, but I wouldn't call it "pain." It's at the worst in the mornings for sure, but if they're becoming painful consistently throughout the day, you might want to rest a bit.

If you really want to know, keep going until you hurt yourself. Congratulations, you've found your limit (I'm only partly kidding -- anyone who climbs for an extended length of time will start to figure out their own limits simply by trial and error -- overuse injuries are very common in climbing).

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Where on your finger is it? Is it tender to the touch, or does it just hurt to make a fist? It's very likely you have an overuse injury, which will heal quickly as long as you don't aggravate it. Take 4-5 days off, and in the meantime, go get some power puddy or a squeeze ball and do that all day every day. These injuries heal slowly due to lack of blood flow, and if you can keep the blood flowing in your hand, they'll heal exponentially quicker. I find running warm water over the hand to help as well. After 4-5 days, Start back in slowly, but not too slowly. Some pain is okay and expected one you start back up, but you should notice that it gets generally better each day, and that the pain is largely present on the ground, not while actually climbing.

I've lived by this article whenever I get injured, and it's served me well (for reference, I climb up to 5-6 times a week and I've never had to take more than a week or so off for injury purposes):
http://www.dizzy-heights.co.uk/tendons.html

And in my opinion, tape doesn't really do anything for these types of injuries. I really only use tape for shredded skin and such. Others will disagree, though.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

And this is where the 2 schools of thought regarding climbing injuries come in. Climbing through the pain is never a good idea at first, but if it's not a serious injury (ie, you didn't feel a pop or aren't severely handicapped when it comes to normal daily activities), then I personally believe that any more than a week off isn't going to do you any good. It's the same theory that doctors used to apply to back and shoulder injuries -- people were instructed to avoid stressful activity after an injury for as long as it took to feel "better," but it turned out that this simply prolonged the injuries and slowed recovery. Nowadays, back and shoulder injuries are pushed into rehab as soon as possible, with better outcomes. Time is a necessary component, but bloodflow is what ultimately leads to full recovery, and you're not going to get bloodflow without using the muscles/tendons.

Feel free to ignore me, and conversely don't get angry if my approach doesn't work for you, but like I said it's worked for me through multiple injuries.

Do some research yourself and try various things out. Everyone's body is different and heals differently, so what works for me may not work for you. But I would stress that you should NOT just sit idly by for 6 months and hope an injury heals on its own. It absolutely will not heal completely until you stress it. My very first injury took 8 months to heal because I was so afraid to climb on it that I'd back away at the slightest discomfort. I saw a doctor who said that the pain was likely scar tissue, and told me to stress my fingers and climb through it. After doing that, the issue resolved itself within a week or two. Since then, I've been a huge fan of active recovery rather than passive recovery.

Edit: Also want to emphasize that I'm not saying climb at 100% effort immediately upon returning. Obviously it's a gradual buildup, but some pain is not necessarily a bad thing.

Tarnien fucked around with this message at 02:55 on Jan 22, 2014

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

If you took a year off from climbing, don't expect to be as strong when you come back. Climbing strength fades (and returns, thankfully) very quickly. Also, some gyms are just genuinely bad at setting. If the movement doesn't appeal to you, go elsewhere. Nothing worse than climbing on bad setting (gyms that use footholds as hands, or make climbs hard by simply turning a good hold upside down are personal peeves of mine).

And to the guy who felt a pop in his wrist -- go see a doctor. Sooner rather than later, as it might impact your ability to use the hand in the future.

Tarnien fucked around with this message at 19:25 on Feb 5, 2014

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

4R7 THi3F posted:

Wait, so on some of the paths that I have seen at my gym, you are supposed to use a foothold as both a handhold and a foothold. Does that mean I'm reading the route wrong???


No, you're doing it fine. And again, do whatever works to get to the top. I'm talking about gyms that use ONLY footholds on a climb in an effort to make the climb "hard," rather than using difficult movement/unique positions.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

I usually do 3-4 0's, then 1 of each grade up to whatever I'm working on

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Puseklepp posted:

Wouldn't it be better to use the exercise in their video for tennis elbow, rather than golfer's elbow, which you linked?

Edit: actually, watching both videos, I'm unsure which one apply to me. My pain is centered not on either side the guy describes as either tennis or golfer's elbow. My pain is centered kind of in the middle of the elbow I guess, like, close to the knob of bone in the middle of the elbow. If I reach out my arm with palm facing downwards, the pain is on the right side of the forearm, which made me think it's tennis elbow.

Edit2: I'd like to go to a PT, but last time I went to a PT here I had to wait one month.

Does doing any specific motion make it worse? Pull ups, push ups, moving your wrist? It seems unlikely that you'd have tennis elbow, as that's related to excessive extension of your wrist (the name comes from overuse of tennis players backhanding too much). If you hold your elbows at your side and palms up, the side of your elbow closest to your body is golfer's elbow, which is related to flexing your wrist/fingers (the muscles you use to grip tightly on a hold), while the side further away is tennis elbow, which as I said is related to opening your hands up/extending your wrist. If it's tender on one side or the other, then it's possibly one of those two. If it's tender in the middle, it could be your triceps or biceps (depending on if it's on the bottom or top, respectively). Or one of a million other things. Regardless, stay off it for a week or so, take some ibuprofen if it's inflamed, then ease back into climbing gently. See a PT if it comes back for a more accurate diagnosis and a better plan to fix it.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Puseklepp posted:

Pull ups doesn't aggravate it at all. Wrist movement or push ups may. When I'm holding my hands like you say I'd say the pain is somewhere between the outer side and the middle of the elbow. I'm starting to wonder whether it is tennis elbow or what the gently caress it is, and the pain is still present one week in, so decided to go see a PT and go from there, as I think that is my best bet of getting back in business sooner rather than later. If I'm lucky it's just like last time I had pain in the same area some years ago and it was just really stiff musculature.

When you say "between the outer side and the middle" -- is it on the top or bottom (holding your elbows/hands like I said)? Or is it deep inside? Is it tender to touch anywhere? Anyways, the PT/doctor will have a better idea and they'll get you sorted out better than any internet detective can. You could do some stretches in the meantime and see if that helps.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Puseklepp posted:

If I hold my hands out with palms out, the pain is facing down. There is a slightly tender area about three fingers away from the elbow. I have also found out that the main movement that cause pain is if I flex my arm AND move it upwards. If I do that, I'll sometimes feel tension around my elbow.

Well you have a nerve that runs in that area, and that motion would stretch it out which could cause pain. But again, internet detective and all. Go see the doctor and see what they say.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Everyone climbs at different rates. Your body will adjust to almost any amount of climbing over time, but pushing it too fast will result in injury. If you're going to go two days in a row, only do that once a week or every other week until you're sure your body can handle it. Any changes you make to your climbing routine should be made slowly, and listen if your body says you're going too fast.

With that said, climbing 2 days in a row is by no means bad. Plenty of people do it, but these people also have years of experience with climbing hard and listening to their bodies.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Aquatic Hitchhiker. Thuggier, but probably easier.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

FiestaDePantalones posted:

I've been climbing for about a month, and probably missed four days total in that time.

Just letting you know (and this is coming from someone who usually advocates 5+ sessions a week), you're going to get injured if you keep this up. Your first month of climbing you should not be climbing 6+ days a week (assuming you are getting a proper workout and not half-assing it). Your muscles grow faster than your ligaments, and soon enough those ligaments (the pulleys in your fingers) won't be able to keep up with the strength your muscles are putting out. Something is going to give.

Not to mention, given that your muscles are still in the early stages of development with regards to rock climbing, you might actually be hurting yourself in terms of strength gains by not giving them time to recover. The initial adjustment period of any sport is when the quickest muscular gains are made, and you might be handicapping yourself in that regard.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

That'll happen from time to time. Your technique will improve/you'll develop callouses over time, so I wouldn't worry about it. If it keeps bugging you, just get some belay gloves. Alternatively, tape over that area at the start of the day, and it should help.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Anyone have the Squamish Bouldering guidebook that would be willing to scan a few key sections for me? I ordered the new edition, but it won't be out for a few weeks and I'm leaving for Squamish this week. The old book is out of stock everywhere, unfortunately. I even emailed the publisher asking about a digital copy, but he claims they don't have pdf's of the guidebooks (which seems unlikely to me, but oh well).

Edit: Or if you're anywhere between Portland and Squamish, I could come buy it/scan it in person.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Radical 90s Wizard posted:

Got a shoe question i was hoping some of y'all could help with.


If you can return them, go for it. But if not, I've had that happen plenty of times on various shoes and I always just tape them back together (climbing tape) and it works fine. Just wrap around it 4-5 times and it should stay together.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Looks like I'll be in Denver for 5 days in late September. I'll have probably 2-3 days to climb. Any recommendations for good outdoor bouldering circuits? It'll be me and the GF, so as dense with as wide a range of difficulties as possible. Can probably drive/hike 2-3 hours in any direction. Also, anywhere in Denver/Boulder rent crash pads or guidebooks?

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

modig posted:

Dude he's a boulderer, you can only go to the canyon for The Game.

I have two pretty nice bouldering guidebooks for the area, one for the front range in general, and one for Mt Evan and RMNP (these are both of the drive 1-2 hours + hike 1-2 hours variety). Shoot me a PM if you're interested in borrowing.

Haha ya, definitely looking to boulder. Looks like the plan is RMNP Wed-Fri (9/24-9/26), so I might just take you up on that guidebook offer. I'll send you a PM a bit closer to the date!

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Gonna be in Colorado on Wednesday! Any recommendations (bouldering) for high-density areas around RMNP/Boulder? Not looking to project anything, just looking for a bunch of moderates to sample the areas for the GF and I. Short approaches would be a plus, but I've heard that's not really a thing though in Colorado, so we'll hike as necessary.

Also, anyone between Denver and Estes have some extra pads they'd be willing to loan out for 2 days (Wed-Fri)? The rentals in the area are like $15/day which is a bit much.

modig and gamera I sent you guys PM's as well.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Sounds like we might make a stop in Flagstaff then! That way we can get some climbing in without having to lug pads for 2 hours in RMNP. Not worried about sandbagging, just trying to get a sample of the areas for potential future trips.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

For technique, the best thing you can do is watch someone who is stronger than you and copy what they do. Feel free to ask for advice from people who look like they know what they're doing, most are happy to help.

And just keep climbing. 2 months is a very short time for climbing, and you should be happy about doing v3's. Specific training/drills can largely be put off until a year or two down the line. The best thing you can do to get better right now is just climb more often, and try climbs that may initially seem above your level (and copy the people who look like they know what they're doing).

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

coldfire07 posted:

I was just hoping to supplementally increase strength when I'm not at the gym, just by doing some hangs for a few seconds on the way to the bathroom or something like that.

I'd avoid doing this. If you're just doing this intermittently, it means that you've cooled down, which means either 1) you can hold onto it, which means it's too big to be offering any real strength gains, or 2) it's too small to be hanging on when you're not fully warmed up, and you'll likely hurt yourself.

Hangboards shouldn't be touched unless you're fully warm. This might not be something you've fully come to appreciate yet, but your climbing ability goes up about 5-10x when you're fully warmed up, and your likelihood of injury goes significantly down. Hangboards are meant to be at the limits of your abilities, and thus you need to do them when you're fully warm. Hanging for 5-10s once every 15-20 minutes isn't going to do anything, unfortunately.

Also echoing what others are saying: just go climb more. If you're just starting out, 2-3x a week is plenty, and your body needs the days off to recover fully.

And also want to emphasize: your muscles strengthen faster than your connective tissue (tendons, pulleys). So even if you "feel" strong, if you haven't been climbing for very long then your connective tissue won't be ready for the stress of real hangboarding. If you just want to monkey around on the jugs of a hangboard that's fine, but you'd be better off just making the trek to the gym than doing any hangboarding for the time being.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

In addition to the sizing, there are really only a couple of other factors that go into a shoe: closing system (lace, velcro, slipper, etc), downturn toe, heel style, and type of rubber come to mind.

The closing system is personal preference. I use lace outside because they fit a little more snug, but velcro indoors for the convenience. Slippers are good too. If you're climbing strictly in the gym, I'd go with velcro or slipper.

Downturn: If you're climbing 5.11, you don't need any real downturn. Avoid shoes like Solutions, Dragons, Talons, etc. These will cost extra and won't be of any use until you start climbing on more overhung stuff. Look for something with a flat bottom, like Evolv Defy, Five Ten Galileo, Five Ten Coyote VCS, La Sportiva Katana, etc.

Heel style: Some heels are just rubber, some have teeth, some have grooves. This is really personal preference again, as none really work better than others. Just make sure your heel fits snugly inside the heel cup without a lot of dead space (Five Tens, in my experience, have a lot of dead space. La Sportivas fit my heel much better).

Type of Rubber: They're all different, but they all work well. If you buy from one of the big companies (Evolv, Five Ten, Sportiva, Mad Rock, etc.), the rubber will be fine.

The reason expensive shoes like Solutions and Team 5.10s and such are expensive is because they're designed to hold their shape (downturn) after lots of use, and because they drive your foot into an aggressive position. If you're not into hard overhung bouldering, they're wasted money. Buy something in the $70-120 range and you'll be happy with them. If you go to the store and there's a pair of shoes on sale for $20 that fit you well, buy them. There's nothing wrong with a cheap pair of climbing shoes.

Personally, I found a few types of shoes that fit me well, and just buy a new pair every time the old one dies out.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

armorer posted:

I agree with you in general, but there is tons of overhung stuff easier than 5.11 which would benefit from a downturned shoe.

One other thing that also varies from shoe to shoe is the stiffness of the forefoot platform. Some shoes are better for edging because that section of the sole is more stiff and you can plant it more securely on a tiny protrusion.

Keep in mind also that there is a guy who works in my gym who regularly cruises through V6 problems in a pair of Vans, so for all the difference a pair of shoes can make, they won't work miracles or anything.

I'm not saying there isn't downturned stuff easier than 5.11, just that the downturned shoes are designed for holding onto little foot chips with very small edges under roofs. Most of the easier roof climbing involves big, flat feet that wouldn't necessarily be helped much by a downturned shoe. Regardless, the tradeoff you'd lose in terms of making flat wall climbing harder/more uncomfortable would make me recommend avoiding anything downturned until you're sure it's what you need.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

Papercut posted:

From your log I get the impression that you only ever rest like 3-6 weeks and then you start climbing again even though it still hurts. That is a recipe for permanent damage. You need to listen to your body and avoid anything that causes pain until the pain is completely gone. Tendon injuries can easily take 6 months to heal. Even after you're pain free, you're supposed to wait a few weeks to resume activity. And when you do resume activity, you need to ramp it up VERY slowly.

We have this discussion every couple of months in here, and I want to put my perspective out there so that you (Frown Town) can have multiple opinions and decide for yourself.

I disagree *STRONGLY* with the "rest more" mentality. I've explained my reasoning many times before, so I'll refrain from doing it again here, but to summarize: use the finger, but do it intelligently. If you (or anyone) want more specifics than that, feel free to PM/email me.

You might consider reading the new book by Dave MacLeod (5.14/V14/E11 climber): http://davemacleod.com/shop/makeorbreak.html
In it, he talks about why "rest more" is an outdated, unsubstantiated approach, why resting is not always (read: almost never) the best answer, and gives you some guidelines on how to gauge when rest is a good idea and when it isn't. I'm NOT advocating you go to the gym and climb every v10 crimp line you can find, but I honestly believe that resting for 6+ months is just as bad.

You might also consider picking up some of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G2G22IO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
The limiting factor in connective-tissue healing is bloodflow. Grab one of these guys, and go crazy with it on your finger over the injury and it will turn bright red as it flushes with blood. I know it sounds very voodoo-magic, but I've noticed a drastic decrease in healing time due to finger tweaks since I've started using them.

I'm very happy to talk at length about my experiences with injuries (there have been many) -- the mental struggle to recover from serious climbing injuries have been some of my lowest moments. Just PM or email me. Humblebrag to add some credibility to my post: v12ish/5.13c'ish climber, been hangboarding (3x/week) for several years, currently working at a Sports Rehab clinic, and have recovered from more injuries than I care to count.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

petrol blue posted:

Doing what?

Doing a clinical rotation as a medical student.

Papercut posted:

I haven't read McLeod's book so I don't know what he says, but I see no reason to trust him over medical professionals. High level athletes are more often than not the worst people to trust when it comes to how ordinary people deal with and recover from injury.

MacLeod has a master's in Medicine & Sports Science, so he's not exactly unqualified. In fact, given that he's highly educated in the subject AND climbing at an elite level, he may just be one of the best sources out there. I'm just speaking to what has worked for me personally, but I've been through dozens of injuries and independently came to the same conclusions as MacLeod, long before I read his book. The answer to injuries most assuredly is "rest, then return to form slowly." What I'm advocating for is that the recommendations of 6+ weeks of rest are excessive (again, in my own personal experience). I've found ~3 weeks for the most severe injuries to be best -- 95% of injuries will not necessitate this much rest. My finger tweaks ("Oh, it hurts to hyperextend my DIP on this finger.. Time to take a few days off") usually end up 3-4 days in total, with light rehab mixed in, followed by a quick return to full climbing form within 2-3 sessions.

Regarding the article you posted: one year is (again, in my experience) very excessive unless you're talking extensive injuries requiring surgery and hardware placement. Yes, high level athletes are often different from the rest of us, but saying that they should not be trusted seems silly. They've been through these injuries dozens of times, why would you disregard their advice? In climbing, there is no vast wealth of knowledge with unlimited resources for diagnosis and management of injuries (such as in football, soccer, basketball, etc) to which you can look for reference. Climbing injuries are a relatively poorly understood entity. For every article you post saying to rest for 6 weeks, I can find one saying that immediately rehab is also effective. As a result of this conflict, each individual climber, climbing at any level, is usually left to fend for themselves in terms of what works and what does not. The top athletes are able to climb at the top for extended periods of time because they've learned to manage their injuries well and minimize downtime. People like Dave Graham, who ruptured a pulley in February of 2014, was back to "full" strength within 4 months. Jimmy Webb ruptured a pulley in late November at the Legends Only competition (https://instagram.com/p/wBrrVqqI8Y/?taken-by=jwebxl), then was back to putting up V12 FA's 3 months later (https://instagram.com/p/yrtSZ6KIxG/?taken-by=jwebxl). Yes, they may have good genetics, but if you're not going to trust the people who have personally been through the injuries and recovered, why should you trust a doctor who doesn't even climb?

I got into this same argument with people last time I posted this. I'm not saying it's gospel, I'm simply saying what has worked for me. I've had great success with shorter-than-suggested rests followed by a gradual (but faster-than-suggested) return to climbing. It takes discipline and a lot of experience/trial-and-error, but I've had my share of wallowing-in-self-pity 6 month rests due to injuries, and I'll never go back to that. Not only was it miserable, it didn't even fix my injuries. Again, we're arguing over small degrees of difference -- I'm still advocating rest and slow rehab, just want to minimize the amount of time that people spend in the "injured" phase, and move them more quickly into the "recovering" phase.

Tarnien fucked around with this message at 05:59 on Mar 20, 2015

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

henne posted:

I will say that I hurt a finger and didn't climb for almost 8 months because it didn't get better and it wasn't until I said gently caress it and started regularly climbing real easy that it started to get better. Also if it hurts on slopers but not crimps it could be tendon sheath inflammation instead of a pulley injury? I've heard sheath inflammation is generally safe to climb on without risk of injury but I could be very very wrong?

This is essentially how all of my early injuries played out. I'd take a week off, try to climb, it would still hurt, so I'd rest a week, try to climb, it'd still hurt, rinse and repeat 15 times until it's been 6 months and I hit the "gently caress it, I don't care if it hurts, I'm going to climb anyway," mentality, at which point it begins to resolve.

It's a very, very delicate balance point though. One you can't really understand until you've been through it enough times, and even then it is still incredibly difficult. Pain is tricky.

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

RIP Dean Potter. Really bummed about this.

http://www.rockandice.com/lates-news/dean-potter-killed-in-wingsuit-accident-in-yosemite

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

RabidWeasel posted:

Almost all of the routes at my gym have overhangs (only small ones on the grades I climb) and that's usually where I have issues with clipping for obvious reasons as you said. Other than that I don't really have noticable problems other than the fact that once I get pumped from a bad clip I spend the rest of the climb being sloppy.

You need endurance. Find a route that is a grade or two below your max, and do it many times in a row without resting in between. Even if it's on TR. Just keep going and don't stop until your body won't go any further. Then rest 2 minutes and do it again.

Building endurance sucks, because it's basically "Go be miserable for 2 hours." But it comes on pretty quickly, thankfully.

It's really difficult to build endurance on boulders or when you're falling multiple times on a climb. You need to be on the wall for 5-10+ minutes at a time.

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Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

The coldest I've done is about 25-30 (-3 or -4 celsius) in Bishop over the new years. It's not terrible as long as you're prepared. The initial warming up is the worst part. Make sure you have enough warm layers (long underwear, thick sweater, sweatshirt, and a good puffy). Invest in some really good gloves and socks. And when you're not climbing, walk around rather than sitting down and resting, and carry your shoes around with you inside your jacket. This will make it much more pleasant putting them back on. Those portable handwarmers are also pretty nice.

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