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Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Static barbell/dumbbell holds? If so, consider switching to plate holds, either with a fat bumper plate or a pair of metal plates with the smooth side facing outwards. The pinch grip used in those has had better carryover to bouldering for me.

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Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Look up 'belay glasses'. Goofy but effective. They're kind of expensive but are getting cheaper as more companies start making them.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


gamera009 posted:

For references, I wear 8.5EEE in mens' shoes (Allen Edmonds).

8.5EEE AEs here too, weird. What have been your most comfortable shoes? I've worn Five Ten Rogues (super comfortable but not a serious shoe), Evolv Shamans (good in the forefoot but hurt my heels a lot, I have those bumps near the achilles tendons), and Scarpa Boostics (in 42s and seem pretty good so far, had them about a month).

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


What, if any, supplemental training do you guys do? I started bouldering a little over a year ago but had a long background of weightlifting. About six months ago I added in some gymnastic strength training and it's had great carryover to climbing. I do front and back levers, handstand work, and iron cross progressions(getting a full cross is a distant goal). It seems like the straight arm support work is great for strengthening the elbows' connective tissue as long as you build up loads slowly and carefully. Also, I found that doing shoulder dislocates(both unweighted and weighted) has rehabbed my shoulders to the point that they never hurt any more, which had sometimes been a problem with bouldering:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hROTzJ6XBs

I had a lot of nagging shoulder and elbow pains but they're all gone now. I wasn't expecting to be feeling less pain at 42 than I was at 32 and it's great. A short evening stretching routine six days a week has helped too.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Still B.A.E posted:

loving hell, I just watched that video. Crazy ROM in those shoulders.

When I first started these I had to do them unweighted and have my hands so far apart that the stick would brush the top of my head. One thing I've experienced with dislocates is that you have to take the progress really slow...they're a great rehab/prehab exercise but if you increase weight or decrease width too soon it can cause impingement issues. I was surprised at how completely immobile my shoulders were when I started trying these and the wall extension stretch.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


I dunno...climbing hard 4+ days a week as a beginner sounds like a lot of wear on the joints and is pretty much how I got elbow tendonitis. I had better luck with fewer days but more activities, although my goals across all of them weren't in opposition (no interest in either gaining or losing weight, lifting was deadlift/pullup/oly centric, gymnastic stuff had direct transfer to climbing). I think it's possible to achieve a balance as long as you have an overall fitness picture that meshes together well. Doing something like a Smolov squat routine + bouldering would be ridiculous.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


compton rear end terry posted:

My weakest point right now is grip strength

One of the most humbling things I discovered when I started is how little transfer there is between types of grip strength. I had decent closed-hand 'crush' ability but could barely hold onto a pinch or sloper. Pinch and crimp strength has improved a ton but I still don't spend as much time as I should training slopers.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


French Canadian posted:

Yoga. All climbers should do yoga. Your body weighs plenty without holding barbells, etc. And it helps with range of motion and all other types of problematic joint or muscle problems. Just make sure your teacher is educated on the subject and doesn't let you push too hard. Does your gym have a yoga thing? Most do, or would be inclined to do so if enough interest existed.

Yeah, the six day a week stretching regimen I mentioned is a 30 minute ashtanga yoga routine. It helps so much with recovery.

Never going to quit barbell exercises, been lifting for more than 25 years now and am still benefitting from and enjoying it.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


I'm not climbing at your level yet but I experienced a lot of good core strength improvements on overhung problems by training front levers, they had great carryover. Beast Skills has some good progressions:

http://www.beastskills.com/front-lever/

As far as integrating it into workouts, I started working on these by doing them three times per week on weightlifting days. I was able to start with the single leg front lever, worked up to a few sets of 10 seconds per leg holds, then advanced to the straddle front lever and worked on increasing the amount of time I could hold those. They're a hell of a lot easier with short legs + good hip flexibility so YMMV. When I was up to about a 20 second straddle I tried the full lever and got it for a few seconds, then have been working on incrementally improving the form (keeping the hips from sinking is essential) and duration of those since then. It takes a lot of time and patience but every time I climb a roof or overhung problem I can feel how the work has benefitted me.

Siamang fucked around with this message at 23:51 on Sep 11, 2015

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


IrvingWashington posted:

There's a crazy good sale on at Gear Coop at the moment - you need the link from the email they sent out though:

Here's mine

It's not an affiliate code, I promise. They have a bunch of 5.10s at 50% off, and most La Sportiva is 40% off, as well as other gear. I was bummed because I bought some used Team 5.10s from Amazon but the sizing was way smaller than I'm used to from 5.10. Then I found some Hiangles for less than I paid for the Teams, and they're gonna get here just in time for my trip to take the kids bouldering/top roping next weekend. I almost bought some Dragons too, but I can't quite justify another pair of non-velcros right now :(

Thanks much! I just picked up a pair of Hiangles...hopefully the sizing is similar to the 5.10 Rogues,which was my first shoe. I also have a pair of Scarpa Boostics which are great but a little loose in the heel and starting to get beat up.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


I climb in permethrin-treated socks outdoors because I'm terrified of Lyme disease and Pennsylvania is crawling with ticks. Thin socks don't really make a noticeable difference to me.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


I have 8.5EEE feet and over the past year and a half or so have worn:

Evolv Shamans: good width but hurt my heels a lot.
Scarpa Boostics: comfortable width but bruised my big toes.
Scarpa Instinct (lace): good width and no pain anywhere after break-in period. These are going to be my go-to shoe.

Size 8.5 in the Shaman and 42 in the Scarpas. I was able to pick all of them up on clearance for around $100.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


gamera009 posted:

I'm in the same boat. Just tried the instinct VS and they felt good. Might pick up a pair if I can find it below $140. That poo poo is stupid expensive.

How is the odor control compared to the shaman?

I never had a problem with smelly shoes, even with the shamans, until I went through a period when I left them in a backpack after climbing in them. My Boostics smelled bad, but the Instincts still smell like suede after several months because I've been keeping them very aired out in between sessions. I've heard a lot of people complaining about the Evolv shoe smell, though, and from my experience with synthetic materials + exercise, they tend to really reek.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


I bought the 5.10 Rogue VCS for my first pair and they were super comfortable. I went down half a size. Currently wearing the Scarpa Instinct lace-ups, never going back to velcro. Being able to adjust with more precision helps a lot since my feet are so wide in certain spots.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Zephro posted:

It's not that. I don't have much time to climb and even less to train / do other exercise between job and family and commute, so I don't want to spend time doing things that aren't going to help. If more/heavier pullups aren't going to be of much benefit then I guess I'll start doing something else with that time instead.

Weighted chins (never more than 5 reps per set) give me a lot of pulling power, although I'm new enough to climbing that I can't really apply it as effectively on smaller holds. I think training the variations of front levers might be better use of bar time if you're willing to deal with feeling really weak when you first try them. Try both for a couple of weeks and see how they feel? It shouldn't take more than ten minutes to knock out a couple sets of weighted pullups/chins and then a couple more sets of tuck levers.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Nifty posted:

My gyms color circuit ranges are sets of three: 2-4 (green), 3-5 (red), 4-6 (blue), etc. The intention is so that people will try things outside their comfort zone. Unfortunately what ends up happening is everyone just thinks all the greens are 3s, all the reds are 4s, so the colors are simply proxies for specific grades. I hate colors.

My gym has the exact rating that you described and I got used to it. At Seattle Bouldering Project they have this:

2-4 (green)
3-5 (red)
4-6 (blue)
5-7 (orange)
6-8 (purple)
7-? (black)

There are some greens that give me problems and some oranges I can flash. I think that considering the grade as a really basic descriptor to the problem and then reading the route to get a genuine idea of how challenging it's going to be for you is what really works.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Dutymode posted:

I took a closer look, and I think it was more where the leather finger loop slightly overlaps the neoprene sock at the top.



It would rub a small raw spot right at the top of my foot/ankle on both feet. Really such a silly thing to ruin a shoe for me, but I wore them for a year and it never stopped.

Why not try putting a piece of moleskin padding either on the shoe where it rubs you or on your foot where it gets rubbed?

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


When I hear 'rockfall' I think of a few head-sized rocks falling, but drat:

https://twitter.com/YosemiteNPS/status/913595020342464518

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Kryopsis posted:

With the Scarpa Force V, downsizing by 0.5 resulted in intense pain even before affixing the velcro strip, while matching my street size was still pretty awful. I ended up going with a pair of downsized Red Chili instead, as I could at least climb the store's demo wall without experiencing extreme discomfort. I still can't wear them for longer than 10 minutes at a time but that's due to the toe box area.

It seems like there's a lot of room for variation when it comes to wide feet. I'm a 8.5 EEE and the Force Vs were one of the few shoes I wore that felt really comfortable, even downsized, out of the box. I have hilariously paddle-shaped feet:



Someone else who has a wide toe box and more normal midfoot is going to have a completely different impression of which wide shoe is good for 'someone with wide feet'. I've really only been able to wear lace-up leather shoes that allow for a lot of expansion on the outer side. I'm curious about the Butoras but haven't had a chance to try them out.

Siamang fucked around with this message at 20:18 on Jan 19, 2018

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Sharks Eat Bear posted:


In addition, finger strength training on a hangboard is probably the best tool for mitigating finger injuries, as you can have complete control over the loads you subject your fingers to, as opposed to bouldering where you're likely moving much more dynamically and will be much more tempted into overdoing it for the sake of a send. I actually think that the best reason to start hangboarding earlier than later is to condition your tendons so that they'll be ready for action once you start getting into grades that are more finger-intensive.


I'm just finally getting this after two years of bouldering and several minor finger injuries from going too hard on problems. I find it easier to be conservative on the hangboard than I do on a problem.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Caf posted:

For anyone else who enjoys watching comps (or hasn't watched one before), USA Climbing's bouldering national championship is going on today and tomorrow and it's all streaming live.

Qualifiers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m_m-uWTnbc
Semis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYMjq4_Odkc
Finals: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHR63TNGn7o

Thanks! I love having these on in the background.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Once I got into the habit of aways clipping my shoes to the outside of my bag after climbing instead of putting them in it I stopped getting any smells. I had good luck with the bamboo charcoal bags before that, though:

http://mosonatural.com/Minimoso

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Ubiquitus posted:

Hm but you can also lose ROM from too much muscle.

This is never explained in satisfactory detail.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


DrAlexanderTobacco posted:

If anyone wants to look into deadlifting to supplement climbing, and has had trouble with form in the past, I can't recommend this video enough. I consider it to be the gold standard for anyone who has trouble understanding proper deadlift form. Friends of mine have struggled for months, lifting unsafely, and this vid straight-up fixes them.


Yeah, one of the things I've noticed about some people who have trouble deadlifting is that they're looking at a picture of someone in the 'correct deadlift starting stance' and trying to fit their own particular limb/torso proportions into the same stance, which often ruins the mechanics of the lift. The method in this video works really well.

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


quote:

Crimping on boulder problems can be much safer than crimping on a fingerboard or especially a campus board.
...
Crimping on the fingerboard can be quite safe if your form is perfect.

This part doesn't make sense to me. If I'm in the middle of a problem my crimping technique is probably going to be less controlled than if I'm on a hangboard. Also, from reading the article it looks like he's using 'crimp' to talk about closed-hand crimps for most of the article. He advocates getting strong with open-hand strength instead and doesn't make any recommendations about quantity/type of training for that.

Siamang fucked around with this message at 14:36 on Apr 6, 2019

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Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


bltzn posted:

Does anyone have recommendations for a shoe with a less aggressive heel? I have a pair of Tarantulas and there's just too much space in the heel. Is there even such a thing as a less aggressively heeled shoe, or should I just get some kind of heel inserts?

That's not necessarily an 'aggressive heel', it's just that different brands (and models across the same brand) can have different heel shape and volume regardless of the aggressiveness of the shoe. I've had the same heel space problem with the La Sportivas I've worn, but have found most of the Scarpa and 5.10 models to be much better fits. I have a wide foot and a narrow, fairly low volume heel. Butoras are supposedly also good for that foot shape, but I've never tried those.

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