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Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



On fear of climbing:

Fear and learning oppose eachother: If you are afraid you will not exercise proper technique. You will tense up, causing unnecessary build up of lactic acid, be unable to do as powerful moves and move jerkily. You can become afraid of several things when climbing, not just the risk of bodily harm. You may be afraid of not sending a difficult onsight. Or be afraid of looking silly infront of other people.

If you practice bad technique - which you WILL do when you are afraid - you will learn bad technique.

Being afraid greatly increases the risk of harming yourself while climbing. If you are afraid when you take a lead fall you might grab the rope, a bolt or carabiner. You will impact the wall much harder with a stiff body. The same goes for taking a fall while bouldering.

In short: It is very important to be relaxed in whatever you do when climbing to both aid in learning and reduce the risk of injury. The solution is two parts: Be sure you know what you are doing and practice the scary things, starting low and slowly extend your comfort zone.

If you boulder, you must know how to fall properly. Most boulder falls you land on your feet. When you do, drop down in a sitting position and roll over on to your back. Landing on your feet and not dropping down shock loads the joints, risking short- and long term injury. If you fall horizontally, land on your side, head up and lower arm straight, parallel to your body and slightly in front of it. The arm should impact the ground together with your body to absorb some of the impact. Ask a buddy who has practiced martial arts!

If you lead climb, learn how to manage the rope in relationsip to your legs, how to clip and be completely confident in your gear - a good buddy check and practice falls will go a long way if you are new. The only way to become accustomed to falling is to practice it. Start with falls underneath the bolts and steadily increase the amount of slack and inch your way above the bolt. Ideally you should be confident in taking a lead fall where you extend the rope above your head to simulate a fall while clipping a bolt.

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Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



My right bicep is acting up at muscle hold to my forearm. When I do heavy bouldery moves - overhanging, sidepulls/gastons it starts to hurt. 2 weeks of resting (being sick) hasn't fixed it. If I keep at it I'll hurt more and more and my arm will finally go slightly numb.

A multisport nerd friend suggested that my bicep doesn't relax post workout and just by gently massaging it and it started hurting just like after a heavy boulder session.

Someone suggested I should tape it but it doesn't help that much from what I can tell.

Anywhere I can read up on this type of problem or should I contact a physiotherapist? Anyone else got similar problems? I'm not even sure what it is. Is it tendonitis?

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Not being able to climb for three weeks would suck. Regular roped climbing and moderately heavy things like chin ups are fine. It's just the heaviest moves that causes aches. I think I'll go see a PT soon.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Texibus posted:

I managed to get up all the routes I tried up to a 5-11 difficulty thing (cheated a tiny bit by grabbing on to some easier trail stuff on the side), only fell once.
Pretty much everyone need several months of frequent climbing to reach USA 5.11. Rude as hell as a first timer almost doing one! One of the world's best climbers, Chris Sharma, did a 5.11b on his first day of climbing and that was a stunning feat.

Anyone got a hangboard at home by the way? Mine feels slippery compared to the one at the rock gym, even with chalk. I barely sweat but it could be greasy. Should I get a bottle of liquid chalk? It's wooden.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



I've just been to one bouldering competition. It was a social thing where you had three hours to finish as many boulder problems you could of 40 brand new ones. They ranged from blue to green taped (Swedish grades) - about Font 4 to 8A (V0- to V11). Prices were raffled off to all participants. Best bouldering session of the year!

triskadekaphilia posted:

I just bought some La Sportiva Cobras size 38.5 off backcountry, because I have nowhere to try them on locally. I'm a women's 9.5-10 typically, so that's putting me down 2-2.5 sizes from my street shoes, but the reviews all range from saying to get them from 2 sizes down to 4 (which sounds really extreme to me, but I am far from an advanced climber so...).

I have Five Ten Rogues right now that I think are equivalent to a women's 9, and I never liked the way the fit/they didn't stretch like I thought they would. Am I going to be miserable in the Cobras? How painfully tight should they be when I first put them on, so I know if I need to go up or down with a return? I really like the idea of the slip-ons, because my gym is almost exclusively bouldering and I moved to FL so it's not like I'm going to be climbing trad, or outdoors period, anytime soon again.

I have them. I'm a guy with EU size 40 for my street shoes. Python sizes have been 37, 36.5 and 36 (3-4 sizes smaller). All three sizes fit well and not too painful. Other climbing shoes have been 1-2 sizes smaller and felt similarly tight. It'll be less if you have wide feet :)

The toe box is somewhat moderately downturned to allow for overhanging climbs and recessed holes, while being somewhat worse at slab climbing although the flexibility somewhat alleviates that. The rubber is very sticky compared to newbie shoes so you will stick to worse smears. A downside to sticky rubber is that you will wear them much more quickly if you have bad footwork. Practice silent feet and they will last you much longer!

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 09:04 on Dec 16, 2013

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Dumbdog posted:

What are everyone's aims for the new year then? Id really like to get more 7B+s done and maybe break into 7C. Also trips to the lake district and north wales as often as possible would be good.
Find and send several short term 7a+ projects outdoors.
Two climbing trips this year.
Do more rehab and antagonist exercises in general and especially for my bicep tendinitis.
Eat more protein and visible abs

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



skudmunky posted:

I finally retired my Nagas after 2+ years of solid climbing - I actually wore a thumbnail sized hole under my big toe on one side. Just got Muiras and holy crap I climb so much better with stiff, sticky rubber again.
Holee poo poo two years. I consider myself a decent climber with good footwork but by shoes need resoling every 3 months. What's your secret?

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



No climbing vacation for me and my main climbing buddy this semester due to incompatible schedules. :( Buuut me and another friend might go on a 3 week car trip centered on California in June. I've never been to the US so which crags would you recommend? It wouldn't be a dedicated climbing trip but we could perhaps squeeze out 5 days at one crag and a couple at some other. We'd be looking for sport pitches in the 6a-7b range (font).

On another note I think we should be posting more videos!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvJK5IuS5Z4

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Dumbdog posted:

Unless your climbing on some kind of super rough rock that kills your shoes then thats amazingly fast. If you dont mind me asking how long have you been climbing?
3 years. I climb 4 times a week at around 7b. I wear La Sportiva Python which has very sticky rubber so it wears easier than less sticky shoes (like Mad Rock).

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



modig posted:

This approach hasn't worked as well with my elbows, so I'm still figuring those out. Also climbing outside is a good way to recover, since climbing below your max outside is way more fun than doing it inside. Learning to trad climb was my recovery plan one year as well.

Rehab exercises, taping it, Voltaren gel and avoid max strength overhanging moves for a while seem to have cured my chronic bicep tendinitis. I believe the biggest contributors have been the rubber band exercises. Haven't felt any pain or the need to tape for two weeks now. Guess I should also start lifting weights to occasionally work the antagonist muscles as well.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Sooo which climbing mag should I subscribe to? I'm mostly into sport climbing but want a magazine for all aspects of the sport. They must ship to Sweden and the magazine must be in Swedish or English.

Climbed for my third day in a row today, tired and slightly hungover and it felt awful. I got pumped to death during the very soft warmup. Despite this I kept climbing and somehow I climbed as well as ever. Mono pockets, dynos, gymnastic heelhooks - everything clicked. Wierd.

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 22:02 on Feb 23, 2014

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



guppy posted:

I don't know what the consensus is on them, but my gym sells these: http://www.amazon.com/Metolius-METOLIUS-Gripsaver-Plus-Medium/dp/B00A6EO9Y8

Those aren't going to do squat in terms of finger strength. They are designed for rehab and injury prevention. The only type of finger strength that matters when it comes to climbing is isometric. Regular climbing on anything other than jugs, hangboards and campus rungs will improve finger strength. E: But really if you've not climbed frequently for at least a year chances are your tendons and ligaments aren't strong enough for a hang board regiment. Muscle strength increases much quicker than the your tendons.

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 13:26 on Mar 4, 2014

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



I think it would be interesting to see what you guys do to improve your climbing ability. Plateauing is a major thing that climbers worry about and since climbing requires many different skill sets and abilities it's sometimes hard to pinpoint why we stop improving. Sooo if you're interested do some self-assessment!

Where are you now skill-wise, what have you done recently to improve and what are your plans for the season?

I'm currently climbing three times a week and outdoor season has just started here in Sweden. Last season I was at a 7a level outdoors for short term projects, with a max level at around 7b (5.12b) and believe my major weaknesses was muscle strength. I have focused on bouldering the last three months and have noticed an increase in shoulder and arm strength, and improved twitch muscle strength for stronger dynamic movements. Bouldering has also helped me with technique - two things being better heel hooks and better coordinated dynamic moves. I have also added several injury prevention exercises to counteract bicep tendinitis.

Right now I'm focusing on anaerobic training and leading for a month coupled with outdoor climbing to improve my endurance. Each lead I finish I will finish off with a fall and will also attempt moves that I know I will fall on rather than having the slack taken in to keep my lead psyche in the right place.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Chris! posted:

my friend and I are considering just buying 40m or so of rope and slings, and going ahead and having a go at setting up top ropes ourselves at the southern sandstone - how hard can it be?
Just be sure to know what you're doing. I've seen twice people setting up incorrect anchors. In one case the rope was threaded along and through a sling, causing the sling to almost burn off before I got them to stop. The second case had two ropes in parallel through an anchor, melting the second rope when repelling off the first.
There are many things to consider when setting up an anchor, how to protect the fixed slings from friction, how to balance loads and avoid magnifying them (eg the american death triangle). You also need to know how to rep to safely set up the anchors in some places.

In short: Sure you can do it but I would recommend just going a quick course in outdoor lead climbing and buy quickdraws instead of slings. You get to climb much more because you avoid the logistics of setting up anchors. One day with a guide and you will know the ropes (heh). If you climb under prepared you really do risk dying. And that would be pretty silly.

E: Also, buy a longer rope! Look up all the local crags and buy a rope 10 meters longer than the routes (you will need some extra since you will trim it down when the ends starts getting worn.

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 16:59 on Mar 17, 2014

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



WYA posted:

Why never climb stiff?
If your body is stiff your muscles are cold and with not a lot of blood pumping through them. You are much much more susceptible to damage then. Both from over stressing the muscles on hard moves and taking a fall or some other way shock-loading them.

FiestaDePantalones posted:

Wow... and here I was thinking of switching from climbing near daily to twice a day. Guess that's a bad idea around here?
(I'll go ahead and assume you climb 5.12 and been climbing steadily for a year minimum. Otherwise pushing your body this hard may just lead to injury.

After a session of heavy physical activity your muscles are worn and need time to recover - they enter a resting state and it is during this period new muscle fibers are formed - muscle fibers actually 'die off' during your workout. Not allowing sufficient rest between sessions will interrupt the recovery and your muscle strength and mass will deteriorate. I would never climb hard twice in a day.

You can climb consecutive days but you should then mix it up. If you've used the system wall, hang board, campus rungs or done heavy bouldering/climbing you should avoid it the next day. Such heavy things wear on quite fragile muscles as well as your connective tissue and sinews which need longer time to recover.

On your second days you could stick to anaerobic training like 4x4 bouldering circuits, laps with rest intervals. You can lead juggy and slopey routes and even add 3 second bent arm lock offs on grabbing new holds. Contact strength and isometric training is generally safe to do when you're tired.

I guess you could do aerobic endurance exercises, like ARC:ing (a 45 min session of continuous climbing) but I know I need a rest day after such a session. Laps and ARCs are also good for focusing on developing technique. If you just climb at max ability your technique will generally not develop as fast, or worse: you may learn sloppy technique.

Anyone who has been on a longer climbing trip knows that you can maintain a longer period of moderately hard climbing without rest days but afterwards you _will_ need a longer rest. After 11 days of onsight level climbing in Turkey I needed four days to recover fully.

Also, if you climb this heavy you should really add antagonist and injury prevention exercises to your routine.

E: At this level you could consider periodization but since it's my first year trying it and don't consider myself a good enough climber I'm not that well equipped to answer it.

Anyways, a general climbing cycle consists of:
1) endurance training (aerobic)
2) hyperthropy training (maximum strength)
3) recruitment training (strength and power),
4) interval training (anerobic)
5) a rest period or combining the interval training with an active rest period
7) sending hard

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 21:23 on Mar 19, 2014

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



FiestaDePantalones posted:

Nope. Generally follow Cavefish in the mornings and accessory work at lunch, paired with the required running/cardio for my organization, then climb just about every night for a couple of hours, in which I warm up with a pyramid of 4 5.6, 3 5.7, 2 5.8, and 1 5.9 back to back with as little rest between "steps" as possible and zero rest between repeats of the same route. Then focus on my current 5.10 projects, then when I am tired at the end another pyramid to help with the instant desire to power through and focus on form. I've been climbing for about a month, and probably missed four days total in that time.

My conundrum was whether to replace the weight training in the morning and lunchtime with more climbing and shorter maintenance based weight lifting at lunch.
Um you work projects every day without rest days? You might want to look into if you're on the early stages of developing overtraining syndrome.

If you're this serious about climbing I would recommend getting reading up on training for climbing. I like the book The Self-Coached Climber, but there are others. It has a very good chapter regarding how to set up your own training plan. Generally, I would say that at your level you want to mix up your climbing days a lot more. That you're still climbing 5.10 is one of your saving graces since pulling on jugs mostly work your major muscles and they can take a harsher beating - although I would be surprised if you don't develop bicep tendinitis or any sort of shoulder problems in the near future.

I would really recommend slowing it down and adding some exercises to train movement:

Movement initiation (hips, lower leg and upper leg), one hand traversing, no hand climbing, blind climbing, flagging traverse, 'every move a drop knee'-jug rally.

You might wanna watch the movie Improve your Climbing with Neil Gresham.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



FiestaDePantalones posted:

All right, I'll ease up guys, Thanks for the info. I know myself that I don't have the ligament strength for the more crimp heavy routes, so yeah I should probably be giving the hands more rest since that is when recovery happens. I understand the reasoning, but just hate the feeling of wasting time I could be lifting or climbing. Thanks for the advice, though. I'll try to chill a few times a week.

Edit: But seriously you guys were sending 5.12 that quick? Maybe I suck at this worse than I thought...
You really just compete with yourself, and with your dedication you will probably develop really fast. Former gymnasts and the like can develop really quickly and a gym going guy can brawl his way up V5s pretty much right off the bat (but may also develop poor technique which may hold him back longer than many other).

Some people are also naturally good climbers. Chris Sharma onsighted 6c on his first day.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Sharma's latest adventure: http://www.redbull.com/en/adventure/stories/1331640225886/into-the-light-climbing-out-of-a-cave-in-oman

Anyone up for some cave multi pich?

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



I'll be in Japan for three weeks, namely Tokyo and Hiroshima and plan to bring my shoes. Any good indoor gyms I should check out? I assume there are no sport crags nearby which would justify me bringing a rope and quickies...

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Anyone in the Stockholm area interested in joining me and two more the last weekend of june at Gåseborg? We'll be camping out but join for just sat if you wish. My gf isn't too keen on me camping out with just girls. :shobon:

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



alnilam posted:

Can anyone recommend a good squeezy grippy thing for building forearm/grip strength?

I've had to be out of climbing for a while and still have to for a few months. Meanwhile I'd like to rebuild my grip and forearm strength a little.
Developing eccentric strength is kinda pointless to a climber since all we use is isometric strength. Hence a ball or some other grip device won't do you much good. Get a hangboard if you wish to increase muscle fiber recruitment and improve your strength, but realize you should already have a good base before starting (you should at the very least be a solid 7a climber). Also keep in mind that muscular strength will increase much much quicker than the strength of your tendons. So take it easy the first year or so. Be sure to train your antagonists and throw in some contact strength as well so don't just go for the crimp holds on the board.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Any Stockholm climber lurking here interested in getting out to pull on some granite this fall? I'm always keen for some Örnberget.

How do you overseas finance bolting routes? Here its like 20% private donations and the rest out of your own pocket. It's so drat expensive to bolt. One 4 bolt route cost me and my buddy like 100 USD.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Anyone been to Cuenca, Spain for a climbing vacation?

Me, my gf and another couple (with baby) are considering going there for a week in April, but I'm kinda apprehensive part because the town is touristy and kinda expensive and part because there seems to be a lack of easier routes. There seems to be a plethora of good technical, sharp 6c-7b+ routes which is good for two of us, but we would also need several easier 4-5c routes.

Do you know of any other good climbing spots where it's easy to bring a kid with not too pricey hotels near the crags in europe? Preferably reachable with low cost flights. How's Ceuse in France? Cheap flights and the rock looks stunningly good.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Jackchaos those pics are amazing! It's been cloudy and too cold to climb here in Sweden for two months straight. No sun either so the rock has never had time to dry. Last time I went out was in early october. I'm going crazy.
We had a good invitational boulder comp at my home gym last week tho.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwtdmaYI7WQ
Jimmy Webb, Adam Ondra, Jan Hojer, Jernej Kruder, Alex Megos and Daniel Woods attended. Problems ranging between 8a and 8b+ (V11-V14). I've not seen any of the local talent send one, but the route setters have come pretty close.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



So what are your goals for 2015? Mine's just a tick list of local routes.
Panta Rei (Örnberget, 7a)
Freaky Deaky Direkt (Nacka Kvarn, 7b)
Titta vi flyger (Flaten, 7a)
Himmler (Gåseborg, 7a+)
Anomalocaris (Ekoberget, 7a)
Pumpmaskin (Skevik, 7a+)
Gökägg (Ryssgraven, 7a)

E: Perhaps a bit premature to plan already but I need something to look forward to!

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grade_%28climbing%29#Comparison_tables

An UIAA VIII- is ~ 6c/+ ~ 5.11b

E: It was pretty funny that UIAA grades are used in Geyikbayiri, Turkey too since most of the development in the area is by Germans. Soft grading too :)

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 09:48 on Dec 8, 2014

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



bartlebyshop posted:

My toes responded by growing a little nub of bone - it looks a little weird. The shoes would really start to hurt after about an hour, even though they fit great at the start. My current shoes fit very slightly better and don't have this pressure on the toe.
File it off! Chances are your shoes will fit great once the extra skin is gone too since they will have stretched to accomody it! Had the same prob. All good now after 20 mins with a glass nail file.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



jackchaos posted:

Got invited to setter showdown, which is a comp for setters. Anyone have comp route setting tips?
Bat hang finish and make a really reachy overhanging move to force people to do a figure-4. Avoid building dynamic moves between mono pockets and climb with your shirt off??

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



armorer posted:

"Free climbing" is climbing as we know it. "Free SOLOing" is climbing by one's self with no ropes or safety devices. The terms are similar enough that when someone says "He free climbed it", people often hear "He free solo'd it" which means something quite different.
To add to the confusion, there is also roped soloing where you self belay. Technically also free solo climbing. :)

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Happiness Commando posted:

I'm climbing V0s and 5.8s now. Will The Self-Coached Climber help me, or should I just keep climbing until I'm closer to 5.10s?

Self-Coached Climber has a large focus on basic movement skills such as flagging, drop knees etc. It also focuses alot on movement initiation and balance which many climbers miss pracicing when they start out. Strong climbers can tear themselves up 5.11 and still lack good form. That being said it is quite theoretical.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



First climb in a week. 2 hours of absolutely rubbish hangover bouldering and I were about to give up and just go sauna when a friend showed up and convinced me to start leading instead. Got 5 moves from sending a 7c and on my second try I managed to find a no hands rest on it (albeit very hard on the core and legs). It feels very possible. Well it goes to show the value of mixing it up if it's not working and having a coffee break.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Amazing pictures! How far from the crags did you stay and what was the accommodation? How's quartzite to climb on compared to like limestone or north European granite?

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005




Went bouldering yesterday in 5 degrees below freezing. Not doing that again. Pretty good session tho.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



gamera009 posted:

Any recommendations for building volumes for walls?

I'm in the midst of converting part of my garage to climbing gym and I'm trying to figure out how to put in some kind of modular volume that I can bolt in and remove easily.
Is your wall going to have a matrix of bolt holes? Then it might be easiest to make a volume with a bolt hole in the middle and then just add a screw to keep it from turning then.

This seems like a good guide. It relies on screws to keep the volume in place through. If you make a solid base for the volume some extra 1 by 2, and add a flat top you should be able to bolt a smaller hold straight into the wall. You can then keep it from turning by adding a screw or two.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Anyone bolting here? I'm looking to get my hands on relatively cheap A4 (AISL 316) expander bolts and hangers. They are too fing expensive here in Sweden...

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



henne posted:

Yes. What is your cost per bolt+hanger?
15$ lmao.

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Raphisonfire posted:

What do I need to know and buy if I want to begin bouldering? Also I have a background in strength training so is there anything that I should be aware of before taking this up?
Try it out and see if you like it! You'll need shoes and a chalk bag. You can also rent shoes in the beginning. Generally strong new boulderers learn bad technique and plateau early since they are more able to pull with their arms and can muscle their way through problems. If you want to avoid bad technique, try climbing each problem as controlled and well as possible. Avoid bending your arms/doing pullups if it's possible to shift your legs around instead. Easier problems virtually never require dynamic moves. Learn to back step, flag your legs and use the inside and outside edges of your feet early. When you've established a good base you can add more advanced stuff like hooks, drop knees, bars, jams etcetc. :)

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



petrol blue posted:

Anyone got any advice on breaking in new shoes? I've got one foot bigger than the other, so that one's getting pretty sore after I climb. Is it just a case of 'wear them round the house'?

You COULD buy two sizes if you've got the money. If you want to break them in quicker, you could try chucking them in the oven and the rubber will mold much easier. Just don't set the temperature too high or the glue will melt. :)

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



What's a good method to belay from above (like a seconding climber) with a Grigri when there's no good way to set up a redirect?

Sigmund Fraud fucked around with this message at 19:52 on Jun 23, 2015

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Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Just landed myself an A2 pulley injury on my right ring finger trying to repeat a boulder indoors. In retrospect the warm up could've been a bit better. Good crimps on the problem but you deadpointed to them hard with much of your bodyweight following. Sounded like a twig snapping and the whole finger went numb. A bit swollen but no bowstringing so it's only a partial rupture. Climbing buddy happens to be a doctor and inspected it. He says it's prolly chlamydia.

Anyways I plan to follow this guide: http://www.nicros.com/training/articles/finger-tendon-pulley-injury/

Keep it cool for five days and eat ibuprofen. No climbing at all for 30 days. Perhaps alternating hot and cold baths for it in the meantime. Got a therapeutic squeeze ball too somewhere... Then there's a climbing trip planned but the crags got plenty of trad cracks so I guess that's what I'll be focusing on.

Any more tips?

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