Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Climbing gyms are massive air volumes with very few interstitial walls and ceiling spaces where you could place ducts or HVAC units. It would be enormously expensive to effectively climate control them.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Grandmaster.flv posted:

Am I going to die if I wear my Fei-yue martial art shoes climbing? They're super simple canvas shoes with heavy rubber treads intended for, well martial arts but they're awesome for parkour and that kind of stuff. They're super grippy but they don't have the kind of support my climbing shoes do.

Yes and on top of that you will look like an idiot. You want really stiff shoes for climbing, not something that is good for parkour. Just rent some shoes.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

triad posted:

Question for all you boulder-ers out there.

I've been plateauing pretty hard for the past 3 months at V5/6s, and I just can't seem to get past it. I've managed a few V5s one V6 before I had to take a couple weeks off for work. Coming back I found that I was struggling with V5s, and even some 4s, and I really haven't been able to move past it.

I hit a similar slump around V3 a year back, but that was mostly a strength issue and I was able to just power through it by incorporating a pullup board routine at the end of each climb, just to make sure I was working out all the right muscle groups. I haven't been able to find the solution this time, though. I feel like a lot of the problem is just learning how to shift my weight around so I don't wreck my fingers with each movement, but I have no idea what sort of routine I can get into to help me with that. I find myself having to make far more dynamic movements than other people on the wall, and I just tire myself out halfway through a tough problem.

Does anyone have any good techniques or work outs that worked for them that I might be able to use to get over this hump? Any advice appreciated!

VVVVVV I'll give that a try, thanks!

This article was in a climbing magazine at my gym. To me it sounds like a recipe for injury and a way to turn climbing into the fitness routine monotony from which it is intended to be my escape, but it does have very detailed weekly and monthly routines and I'm sure if you completed the year you would come out a much better climber:
http://www.climbing.com/skill/your-goal-boulder-harder/

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

semicolonsrock posted:

So I can't climb again until awhile after the knee surgery I'm getting soon. Any suggestions for good work outs so I can get back into bouldering without losing literally all of my strength? I've been doing lots of pull ups, but I'm sure there's a lot more I could be doing.

I just do tons of yoga whenever I'm injured (like right now ). Keeps your shoulders and core super strong and lets you work on balance as well. A good teacher will show you how to modify everything to account for the knee.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

My brother got me some Prana pants that I would wear non-stop in my life if I could get away with it.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

I think the 2nd best exercise for climbing is yoga. Flexibility, balance, the body awareness to be able to move in very controlled ways, plus major shoulder and core strength are all huge for climbing.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Petey posted:

My gym includes free yoga designed for climbing. It's awesome.

My gym has free yoga and most of the teachers are climbers as well. It's awesome. I upped my regular 1 class per week to 3 classes per week while I nurse a finger injury and it's completely addictive. Two years ago, my wife had to drag me to get me to go to my first yoga class and now I'm trying to figure out ways to keep my yoga schedule once I start climbing again.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Covert Ops Wizard posted:

Also smelly shoe people- never buy synthetic shoes. They're no better than non-synthetics and they smell like crap always. I don't know why Evolv thinks it's such a great idea. Since I've gotten away from Evolvs my climbing shoes smell no worse than any other shoe I wear.

Yeah this. I've been climbing several times a week (ignoring injury time) in my current shoes for at least a year and they don't smell at all, I can put my nose right in them and there isn't anything. The only thing I do for them is let them air out after climbing (instead of zipping them up in my backpack). My first pair of shoes were Evolvs and they smelled horrendous after about 6 months.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

ZeroDays posted:

Wow, concentrating on foot work and really paying attention to my feet instead of always trying to reach has immensely improved my climbing. It's one of those things that I knew you were supposed to do, but never actually practiced. So simple, yet so effective. I was always complaining about how my 6,3" partner had the advantage (I'm 5'7") because he could reach poo poo that I couldn't, but I realised I'd revolutionised how I approached a climb when I statically completed a move he had to dyno. Obviously I'm a beginner (been climbing a few months) but it's exciting when things just click.

Next step: start concentrating on your core/hips

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

For moisturizer I love Burt's Bees Banana Hand Cream and Badger Cuticle Care. Use Burt's on the palms and Badger on the backs of my hands. If you already have big calluses try Mane & Tail Hoof Therapy (I think that's what it's called), it dissolves calluses like crazy.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Chris! posted:

I fell from a low overhang today (indoor bouldering), it was a route I've done before I just pushed it a little at the end of a session. I instinctively put my hand underneath myself and managed to hurt my middle finger of my right hand. It bent back the wrong way, it's a finger which has tendon damage already so was pretty painful, I just strapped it to another finger with finger tape and have left it. It's quite sore still and a little swollen but not too bad, not broken or anything. I guess I should just be careful for a while and try and fall better in future?

No you should not climb until you don't have any pain. Tendons typically take 6-12 weeks to heal.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

PRADA SLUT posted:

I know the best way to get better is to climb, but are there any exercises that help? Core and shoulder workouts?

I'm looking for something for when some reason I can't climb.

Yoga. Great for shoulder, back, and core strength and for lower body flexibility

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Frown Town posted:

left elbow, inner? Hard for me to extend but I can bend it with a little pain. Can close and open my fist. Hurts a bit, probably like a 6.5/10 if 10 is max, but pain is a little better an hour later

I did something similar and the doctor said it was most likely an MCL sprain. It's basically the same as a tendon injury, the only really effective treatment is rest.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

pokchu posted:

I kind of disagree with some of the previous training advice. Being as efficient and technically correct as possible is great up to a point, but there comes a level where it won't make you any physically stronger (or at least not with any speed.) once you send whatever you're working on, and are confident in your ability to do so, start climbing in ways to maximize your gains. Straight armed is your weakest position, so try to keep arms flexed and locked off there. Outdoors you will almost always be able to find two feet, so train indoors using only one foot at all times. Keep body tension at a maximum by staying squared up with the wall: no back stepping. And moving staticly isn't the end -all be-All of climbing. If you try to be static ALL the time, you aren't training contact strength and technique. Jimmy Webb sets at TBA in Chattanooga and I overheard a guy complaining to him about just that fact about a route jimmy set. He was told "then I guess you can't send it."

There are all sorts of styles of climbing and it never hurts to work on every aspect. Finger strength, core, and technique are all important, use the gym to train them all, don't ignore some facets for others.

The main problem with climbing sloppy and dynamic is that you're much MUCH more likely to injure yourself that way, and nothing hurts progress more than injuries.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

pokchu posted:

Except that "sloppy" and "dynamic" aren't mutually inclusive. You can easily be dynamic and controlled.

What did you mean by not climbing "technically correct" if you didn't mean sloppy?

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Oh yeah in that case that makes sense, we've talked in this thread about all sorts of weird ways to handicap yourself in order to improve your climbing (climbing with your arms in PVC tubes, climbing without using your fingers, etc). For me at the gym I like to do at least one endurance day per week where I'm climbing pyramids (including down-climbing everything)instead of working on a project. In general I definitely get a better workout when I'm not trying to finish a particular problem and instead focusing on improving specific weaknesses.

I still avoid dynamic stuff unless it's really interesting because I always injure myself and because IMO static climbing just looks a lot cooler (in an aesthetic sense).

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

LA must be cheap as poo poo if $75 per month for a gym membership is absurd. Brooklyn Boulders is $100/mo, Mission Cliffs is $71/mo, Planet Granite is $73/mo, Portland Rock Gym is $63/mo and doesn't even include yoga without an annual membership (plus their yoga schedule is garbage), The Circuit is just a bouldering gym and is $59/mo, etc.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Claes Oldenburger posted:

So after bouldering for a few months, my arms are getting stronger but my wrists still feel weak doing some moves that arn't just straight hanging or pulling. Is there anything I can do to help my wrists get stronger/more stable?

Google for "false grip"exercises, it's how gymnasts strengthen their wrists. You'll start by doing dead hangs from your wrists instead of hands. I agree that just climbing will be more fun and probably more effective though.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

guppy posted:

I feel like I'm making big progress and it's great. Starting to climb 5.9s regularly, and I couldn't get up even one of them a couple months ago -- when I tried back then, in fact, I could barely even start one of them. Climbed 3 or 4 last night, and most of them weren't even that bad, although one of them I had to get myself up through sheer force of will because the holds were awful. (Frankly, it felt mis-graded compared to the others, or possibly like some holds were incorrectly unmarked.) but I did it.

I've been told that you're supposed to start all routes with both hands on the hold marked as the route start, and not move them up until your feet are on the wall. Why is that, and should I respect it? It seems like a silly and pointless rule.

Why would I do the obstacles in this obstacle course when I can just walk around them?

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

guppy posted:

While I'm sure it's fun to be smarmy, this is a misstatement of the issue. You're still using the tools provided on the route, and only those tools. People skip holds further up the route all the time.

The point is that any rule in a sport could be called a silly pointless rule. "Why is the start of the route the start of the route?" is an inane question. No one cares what you do in the gym (or even outside as long as you're not being destructive), so do whatever you want. But if you want to do the route that the route-setter has created, well then do the route.

e: Sorry, I've had a lovely few weeks and clearly I'm responding to that by acting like an rear end in a top hat on the internet. The main reason to do the starts as they're intended (and this can even apply to not skipping holds) is that they may force you to develop skills/muscles that you otherwise might not have.

Papercut fucked around with this message at 01:25 on Oct 4, 2013

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

beat9 posted:

Does anyone have any good strength exercises to recommend? I've been climbing indoors for about 6 months and I'm looking to improve my core especially. I climb two or three times a week, mostly bouldering and I'd like to complement that with some strength exercises. Lately I've been finding that aside from learning a couple of neat techniques my core is probably what needs most work.
I've been reading a bit around the net, and it seems most people don't recommend heavy strength exercises as you risk becoming too large, or heavy rather.
I think my arms and legs have a pretty good progression, and I know for a fact that ever since I started using straight arms my back and shoulders have been getting a pretty decent workout.

Planks, side planks, L-sits, boat pose. Yoga classes are a good place to start, half of the poses in yoga involve core work. I think lifting weights is fine, lots of really good climbers in my gym do it.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

SystemsAligned posted:

This is a good idea! I want to meet all the ppl climbing at Planet Granite in San Francisco!

I'm at PG Friday during the day, Sunday morning, and Tuesday night. Bouldering only, but if you want to teach me to belay then I'm happy to learn. I've barely been climbing at all for a few months though because I'm busy as hell and feel like I get a better quick workout in the yoga classes.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

weekly font posted:

Bouldering question: I've gotten to the point in about 3 months where I've started V2s. Feels good man. There are some V2s that I can do easily and there are others that I can't even start. Doesn't seem to be an inbetween. Is there something I should be focusing on or does any possible advice just boil down to "keep climbing?"

Footwork/body positioning. Watch the feet of climbers who are much better than you.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Here's a fun training exercise:
http://www.planetgranite.com/news/2013/12/02/wow-footwork-frenzy-with-josh/

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

With only 3 months climbing, I would suggest that it's more likely your footwork and body positioning that is preventing you from doing crimpy problems. I would do lots of footwork exercises and stem or drop knee problems to learn how to use everything below the waste to take weight off of your fingers. Unless you're using a hangboard for times when you can't get to the gym or outside, just going climbing is going to be a way more effective form of training.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

tynam posted:

For example, a V3 with a low crimp grip start - just to get on I need to somehow hold a really freakin thin edge.

This is still usually an example of a footwork problem. I see beginners all the time on starts like this with their hips square to the wall, locked off with hands and feet directly in front of them. Usually they should be in something closer to a ninja pose (one leg bent under your body with a straight leg braced way out to the side).

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

You know how to avoid the build-up of scar tissue?

I'm willing to bet most people who've had pulley injuries have tried the "just climb through it" method, because that's a lot easier than not climbing. In my experience with multiple pulley injuries, none of them serious enough to feel a pop or affect daily activities, that's a terrible approach to take (at different points I've had to take anywhere from 3-6 months off when minor discomfort turned into habitual discomfort turned into chronic pain). There are tons of ways to get blood flowing that aren't nearly as risky or tempting in terms of overuse as just climbing through pain.

E: Like if you have a rotator cuff injury, the rehab isn't to just go out there and throw lightly. It's targeted, controlled exercises to rebuild the area around the injury, and only after months of that are you back to being able to pitch at all. Even if you're climbing stuff completely in your wheelhouse, fatigue or a random foot slip can easily lead to putting much more strain on the finger than intended and setback all of your rehab progress.

Papercut fucked around with this message at 04:26 on Jan 22, 2014

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

4R7 THi3F posted:

Wait, so on some of the paths that I have seen at my gym, you are supposed to use a foothold as both a handhold and a foothold. Does that mean I'm reading the route wrong???

Also, my gym has been closed for almost 4 months because the NYC Department of Building found minor discrepancies between their floor plan and what was actually built (stupid stuff like a lightswitch wasn't in the same place as the sketch). It really sucks because my gym closed right when I was starting to *get* bouldering, and now I've probably lost all the strength/skills that I was building up.

Is this Cliffs? I thought it closed because they didn't actually have building permits for the work and opened without getting a building inspection?

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Sigmund Fraud posted:

I think it would be interesting to see what you guys do to improve your climbing ability. Plateauing is a major thing that climbers worry about and since climbing requires many different skill sets and abilities it's sometimes hard to pinpoint why we stop improving. Sooo if you're interested do some self-assessment!

Where are you now skill-wise, what have you done recently to improve and what are your plans for the season?

I'm currently climbing three times a week and outdoor season has just started here in Sweden. Last season I was at a 7a level outdoors for short term projects, with a max level at around 7b (5.12b) and believe my major weaknesses was muscle strength. I have focused on bouldering the last three months and have noticed an increase in shoulder and arm strength, and improved twitch muscle strength for stronger dynamic movements. Bouldering has also helped me with technique - two things being better heel hooks and better coordinated dynamic moves. I have also added several injury prevention exercises to counteract bicep tendinitis.

Right now I'm focusing on anaerobic training and leading for a month coupled with outdoor climbing to improve my endurance. Each lead I finish I will finish off with a fall and will also attempt moves that I know I will fall on rather than having the slack taken in to keep my lead psyche in the right place.

What I do is climb harder and harder routes until I hurt myself so badly that I need to take 6 months off (usually around V5). Then I do other stuff for half a year. Repeat ad nauseam.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Men's and Women's highlights from ABS Nationals:
http://vimeo.com/88063120
http://vimeo.com/88145860

These people are pretty good climbers.

Also RIP Sean Leary. Guess it's inevitable when you live like these guys, but such a sad loss. This guy was incredible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGwXbA3gMP0

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

hostile apostle posted:

So I've been climbing, mostly boldering, about once a week for almost two months now at PG SF. Took down my first V3 today. However, I am absolutely terrible at anything with overhang. I can pretty much do any V2 without overhang, but any of the ones where you get horizontal at all, I can't even start them.

Am I just doing it inefficiently or are the overhang V2s just that much harder? Any recommendations for dealing with overhang?

PG's overhung routes are much harder than their vertical routes, yeah. Even when they are graded the same.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Bread Set Jettison posted:

So a while back I tried to get back into climbing and within 2 months I hosed up a finger. I dont remember exactly what it was but I remember it being a pulley (which I had no idea where in my fingers). I rested till it was fixed and then just kind of stopped climbing. I'm now again trying to redo climbing, so are there any good stretches to avoid this injury?

Your pulleys are tendons, which seem to be unaffected by static stretching; tendons respond to dynamic stretching and eccentric activities. This is why people will typically recommend warming up with plenty of easy climbs before jumping into your projects. Away from the gym, you can get a putty ball to squeeze and use a rubber band around your fingers for eccentric motions.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

bartlebyshop posted:

Did a "climb all the V1s and V2s, downclimbing the V1s" circuit today. Hadn't climbed for 2 weeks and I couldn't hold on to anything by the end. I always feel like complete poo poo whenever someone says "V3/V4 /5.11 should be doable in months" because it took me 2 years to get there of climbing 2-3 nights a week. Now I've been stuck in the same spot for a year (I've gotten 1 V5 in that time).

If you're talking about indoors then it entirely depends on the setters. I've been to gyms where the V4s would be easy V2s at my gym. That's why you shouldn't really worry about what grade you're climbing and instead just look for problems that you like.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

bartlebyshop posted:

I don't think it's just extra skin? If I poke it there's a nice layer of skin on top but a definitely noticeable hard bump of what feels like bone. These old shoes lasted me 1.5 years and finally developed a toe-hole so I'm fine sticking with my new ones. But thank you for the tip! If it happens again I will keep it in mind.

Is it a bunion?

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

spwrozek posted:

Prana Zion Stretch are sweet climbing pants (and wear all the time pants, they are awesome pants).

I'm wearing them right now.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Mahlertov Cocktail posted:

Does anyone get lower back pain from climbing? I don't really think that it's the climbing because I last climbed on Tuesday and the back issues started up on Saturday, but I figured I'd ask. It's maybe six inches above my hips on my right side.

Are you bouldering and not down-climbing? That's the only way I can see hurting your lower back climbing.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Caf posted:

Prana Stretch Zion pants are the best pants by a long shot. Though sometimes I just wear jeans.

Sometimes a get a little crazy and wear my Prana shorts instead of my Prana pants.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Frown Town posted:

My left middle finger joint has been feeling a bit painful, especially after climbing anything particularly slopey/round. Extending super far to reach a sloper seems to exacerbate this pain (which is a thing that happens often due to being pretty short). Crimps seem to bother me less, unless I'm doing harsh diagonal stuff. Then they bug me in a similar way.

I don't want to pull a tendon, but it seems like no matter how much rest I give it, or how much I tape up, the pain's pretty quick to come back (as in, as soon as I touch a sloper). It's been going on for months, usually more of a dull pain afterwards, but today I grabbed a little nubby round hold and tugged my finger in a really lovely way. It's fine now, but I'd like to avoid getting a permanent injury.

I'm not sure if this is a technique thing on slopers and/or crimps or an overuse thing. Can anyone advise me or point me to a good resource on open hand/crimping techniques/preventative care that'll lessen the likelihood of loving up my middle finger for good?

From your log I get the impression that you only ever rest like 3-6 weeks and then you start climbing again even though it still hurts. That is a recipe for permanent damage. You need to listen to your body and avoid anything that causes pain until the pain is completely gone. Tendon injuries can easily take 6 months to heal. Even after you're pain free, you're supposed to wait a few weeks to resume activity. And when you do resume activity, you need to ramp it up VERY slowly.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Tarnien posted:

We have this discussion every couple of months in here, and I want to put my perspective out there so that you (Frown Town) can have multiple opinions and decide for yourself.

I disagree *STRONGLY* with the "rest more" mentality. I've explained my reasoning many times before, so I'll refrain from doing it again here, but to summarize: use the finger, but do it intelligently. If you (or anyone) want more specifics than that, feel free to PM/email me.

You might consider reading the new book by Dave MacLeod (5.14/V14/E11 climber): http://davemacleod.com/shop/makeorbreak.html
In it, he talks about why "rest more" is an outdated, unsubstantiated approach, why resting is not always (read: almost never) the best answer, and gives you some guidelines on how to gauge when rest is a good idea and when it isn't. I'm NOT advocating you go to the gym and climb every v10 crimp line you can find, but I honestly believe that resting for 6+ months is just as bad.

You might also consider picking up some of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G2G22IO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
The limiting factor in connective-tissue healing is bloodflow. Grab one of these guys, and go crazy with it on your finger over the injury and it will turn bright red as it flushes with blood. I know it sounds very voodoo-magic, but I've noticed a drastic decrease in healing time due to finger tweaks since I've started using them.

I'm very happy to talk at length about my experiences with injuries (there have been many) -- the mental struggle to recover from serious climbing injuries have been some of my lowest moments. Just PM or email me. Humblebrag to add some credibility to my post: v12ish/5.13c'ish climber, been hangboarding (3x/week) for several years, currently working at a Sports Rehab clinic, and have recovered from more injuries than I care to count.

I haven't read McLeod's book so I don't know what he says, but I see no reason to trust him over medical professionals. High level athletes are more often than not the worst people to trust when it comes to how ordinary people deal with and recover from injury.

This is a very thorough summary of the anatomy of the hand, types of injuries, and has plenty of links to summaries of therapy approaches:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3377907/

One of the cited articles summarizes treatment as such:

quote:

Holtzhausen and Noakes recommend one to two weeks of splint immobilization with the MPs in flexion and the IPs in extension or slight flexion, followed by a progressive range of motion and strengthening program with occupational therapy. Once the patient has completely pain free motion and 80% of their prior strength, usually at a minimum of 6 weeks, a gradual return to climbing is permitted. Patients are instructed to gradually increase the difficulty and duration of their climbs over an eight-week period. Patients are not permitted to use a crimp grip for a minimum of at least 6 weeks post -injury.8 Schoffl and coworkers,10 in a 2003 prospective study of 604 climbers with hand injuries, found excellent outcomes and a return to previous climbing level within one year for those without bowstringing who were treated conservatively

No one is saying to immobilize for 6 months, but there are MUCH safer approaches to maintaining range of motion and rebuilding strength (finger stretching, rice bowl exercises, putty, etc) than climbing. If you absolutely must get back to climbing as quickly as possible, it can still take multiple months and you should not just jump right back into your previous project when pain is mostly gone.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

SeaborneClink posted:

So I'm moving to the Bay Area, whats the rock climbing scene like there? Looking for some tips both indoors and outdoors. I'll be working and probably living in the East Bay. I'm familiar with Planet Granite's offerings from their Portland location but was curious if anyone had any other suggestions or ideas.

PGSF is awesome. Dogpatch Boulders is newer than PG and also supposed to be really good, but I haven't been. Castle Rock State Park is the main outdoor climbing spot for SF if you don't want to head to the Sierras.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply