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Olive Bar
Mar 30, 2005

Take me to the moon

Almost a year ago I received a M/F pair of C. cyaneopubescens from someone on here, I think it was Unprofessional. When I received them they were smaller than an inch, now they are both ~4"! It's all very exciting, here is a picture of my female, she just molted two weeks ago.


Here is a not great shot of my M. cabocla eating.


And my gorgeous H. lividum (well the opening to her burrow at least.)



Edit: Found a picture I took shortly after getting her, look at those little black feets.

Olive Bar fucked around with this message at 09:28 on Mar 25, 2013

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Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

My G. rosea (I named her Nessa) is doing well, I put her into the newly made tank yesterday and she seems to enjoy it. She adopted the tube shaped clay hide and rarely leaves it. When I put 3 crickets into the tank she waited patiently for them to come close then pulled them into her hide.

I do have two more questions tough, first I know I should remove her food left overs but they are in her hide. Will she put them out of there once she's done? Do I really have to chase her out of there so I can remove them?
Second problem is the humidity, it's only at 40% (my room is 34%). I now covered the ventilation slit at the top with a towel, there should still be enough ventilation trough the front bottom slit. Schultz says to not mist tanks for this species at all as they hate it, but how am I gonna get the humidity up without misting?

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Tahirovic posted:

I do have two more questions tough, first I know I should remove her food left overs but they are in her hide. Will she put them out of there once she's done? Do I really have to chase her out of there so I can remove them?
Second problem is the humidity, it's only at 40% (my room is 34%). I now covered the ventilation slit at the top with a towel, there should still be enough ventilation trough the front bottom slit. Schultz says to not mist tanks for this species at all as they hate it, but how am I gonna get the humidity up without misting?

Most tarantulas do not require any kind of additional humidity. I do not mist any of mine at all and they are perfectly happy. Do not fret about misting, nor covering the cage to keep in humidity. G rosea especially. They like it DRY. With regards to leftovers, if your T is snagging the food and actually eating it I wouldn't worry about it. The real concern would be uneaten crickets dying and being left to rot. No chasing should be require. I know I wrote an awful lot in the OP, but try not to overthink it - You're doing just fine

Olive Bar
Mar 30, 2005

Take me to the moon

Yeah G. rosea like it bone dry. Don't worry about humidity at all. Just a water dish will be fine.

Tasty_Crayon
Jul 29, 2006
Same story, different version.



My friend convinced my boyfriend and I that tarantulas are awesome. He got a Lasiodora parahybana that I can't get any good pictures of, because he's a shy little booger. She gave me her Avicularia diversipes and her Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens.

Garrus: I love his little bellbottom feets so much





Kal'reegar: this guy will apparently meet the cricket on its way in but he ate a huuuuuuge mealworm the day I got him so it will probably be awhile before I get to see it.




SO CUTE

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Awesome Ts! You managed to wind up with two who are a real joy to watch grow in terms of the color changes they go through. I'm totally jealous of the diversipes.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

Finally managed to catch Nessa outside of her hide, so I figured I'd share.

unknown age, female G. rosea (info from LPS not sexed myself, but I don't see any hooks)



I don't know if she is a generic or a color morph. All I know is she a very clean spider, she pushed a bit of leftovers from the crickets outside of her hide, will she always do that?

Olive Bar
Mar 30, 2005

Take me to the moon

She may, she may not. Almost all of my tarantulas have a spot I call the graveyard. They don't want the remains in their hides, so they clean house, the others give no fucks and drop the remains wherever, even in their burrows.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Tahirovic posted:

Finally managed to catch Nessa outside of her hide, so I figured I'd share.

unknown age, female G. rosea (info from LPS not sexed myself, but I don't see any hooks)



I don't know if she is a generic or a color morph. All I know is she a very clean spider, she pushed a bit of leftovers from the crickets outside of her hide, will she always do that?

It depends on the individual in my experience. My avics seem to drop their garbage everywhere, probably fine practice for a tree dweller. Some will dig a burrow, leave the trash at the bottom until they are tired of living in filth, then they will fill the hole and dig a new one. Yet others will bulldoze their crap into a corner like Olives's graveyards or web them up into their little outer walls around their burrows.

inedible
Apr 8, 2009


Hey guys, I have a worrywort question. I've had my first tarantula Lupe, a Chaco Golden-Knee, for about two months now. Thought it was a female until about a month ago when he molted out with tibial hooks and those big 'ol boxing gloves. He looks great, loves his terrarium, and has been the most docile, fuzzy, sweetest little booger I've ever seen... The thing is he won't eat. I know there's no interest in eating before a molt, but I waited two weeks afterwards to let his fangs get good and ready, and he's still not interested. Food walks right by him, not interested. Wiggled crickets in front of his face with feeding tongs, he just completely ignores them. He also doesn't seem to be preoccupied searching for a way out of his enclosure to find a mate, so I'm not sure what the deal is.

Am I just worrying over nothing? Will he eat when he finally gets ready? I'm just really attached to the little guy and want him to be happy and healthy.

Here's a picture of him a few days before his molt. I really need to take some pictures of him now with his really pretty bright yellow stripes.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

inedible posted:

Am I just worrying over nothing? Will he eat when he finally gets ready? I'm just really attached to the little guy and want him to be happy and healthy.


Though experiences differ depending on the individual tarantula, it is not uncommon for an adult male to stop eating and gradually waste away. Try feeding him once a week and if he doesn't eat just keep trying. He may eat eventually or not at all. As near as I can tell males mature quickly and die off so that they will be removed from the gene pool before their female broodmates mature. I know it's no consolation, but on the bright side they can often live for over a year past maturation.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Loath as I am to double post I wanted to share my newest acquisition. I was in training at a new job and as we went around and made introductions we had to do the 'say something about yourself' bit and I mentioned that I was into creepy crawlies. Someone else at the table as it turns out had an unidentified scorpion that her son had brought up from Arizona for some reason and she wanted to know if I wanted it. Consequently, I had to do more care research, which should be reflected in the OP, and I also had my wife take a picture of him for the benefit of the thread. Meet Demetrius:



I believe he is a Centruroides sculpturatus or "Arizona Bark Scorpion." This would make him the most venomous of the North American species, but still relatively harmless in the grand scheme of things.

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Sir Azrael posted:

Loath as I am to double post I wanted to share my newest acquisition. I was in training at a new job and as we went around and made introductions we had to do the 'say something about yourself' bit and I mentioned that I was into creepy crawlies. Someone else at the table as it turns out had an unidentified scorpion that her son had brought up from Arizona for some reason and she wanted to know if I wanted it. Consequently, I had to do more care research, which should be reflected in the OP, and I also had my wife take a picture of him for the benefit of the thread. Meet Demetrius:



I believe he is a Centruroides sculpturatus or "Arizona Bark Scorpion." This would make him the most venomous of the North American species, but still relatively harmless in the grand scheme of things.

I'm not a huge scorpion fan really, but the barks were always my favorites. I've kept tons of scorps over the years, and other than Androctonus mauritanicus, the AZ and FL barks are my favorite. I like them so much, the only scorps I even keep now are some C. gracilis.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

I always figured I would end up with a larger, more common scorpion for my first. I had my eyes on Hadrurus spadix for a while but just never had the opportunity. Needless to say I find that I am not at all disappointed by my diminutive barky. He's rather active and engaging most of the time as compared to the majority of my tarantulas and I was pleasantly surprised at how simple his care requirements are. As I initially had no idea what I was getting I hoped that I wouldn't need supplemental heat or humidity, and the little guy seems perfectly happy being kept like my arid Ts. I have to say that I was a little nervous at first about how venomous the little dude is purported to be, but as I prodded him and did his re-homing it occurred to me that these guys are really not overtly aggressive, nor particularly fast or agile. Their inability to scale plastic and glass is also a boon. I am quite captivated!

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Sir Azrael posted:

I always figured I would end up with a larger, more common scorpion for my first. I had my eyes on Hadrurus spadix for a while but just never had the opportunity. Needless to say I find that I am not at all disappointed by my diminutive barky. He's rather active and engaging most of the time as compared to the majority of my tarantulas and I was pleasantly surprised at how simple his care requirements are. As I initially had no idea what I was getting I hoped that I wouldn't need supplemental heat or humidity, and the little guy seems perfectly happy being kept like my arid Ts. I have to say that I was a little nervous at first about how venomous the little dude is purported to be, but as I prodded him and did his re-homing it occurred to me that these guys are really not overtly aggressive, nor particularly fast or agile. Their inability to scale plastic and glass is also a boon. I am quite captivated!

Barks do a lot better in captivity than Hadrurus. As long as you're careful, scupts are pretty much the easiest scorps to keep. Scupt venom is nasty and painful, but for the vast majority of people, it's just painful and not medically dangerous.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?



Grimey Drawer

Big Centipede posted:

Barks do a lot better in captivity than Hadrurus. As long as you're careful, scupts are pretty much the easiest scorps to keep. Scupt venom is nasty and painful, but for the vast majority of people, it's just painful and not medically dangerous.

Pretty sure this is what stung me when I lived at the zoo. These fuckers were everywhere, and it was very common to get stung by one overnight or during the day, or morning, or pretty much whenever. That said, I got lucky, according to other keepers: I was stung on my left thigh (fucker was probably in my pants when I put them on and didn't shake them hard enough), and my leg went numb for about 24 hours. Painwise, was like a mosquito bite, though the numbness thing did worry me, but without insurance at the time, I just went to work....back stacking food bags with scorpions in between every other one.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Cowslips Warren posted:

Pretty sure this is what stung me when I lived at the zoo. These fuckers were everywhere, and it was very common to get stung by one overnight or during the day, or morning, or pretty much whenever. That said, I got lucky, according to other keepers: I was stung on my left thigh (fucker was probably in my pants when I put them on and didn't shake them hard enough), and my leg went numb for about 24 hours. Painwise, was like a mosquito bite, though the numbness thing did worry me, but without insurance at the time, I just went to work....back stacking food bags with scorpions in between every other one.

Thanks for this. I've heard so many conflicting reports about this species from "bee sting" to "omg fatal" that I've been tempted to just let the fucker tag me and let the gods sort it out for me. I figured if anyone was going to play it straight with me it would be the website for the wildlife service in Arizona, which essentially mirrors BC's assertion - that while nastily painful, their sting is highly unlikely to necessitate a hospital visit.

Fun fact about their venom: It reportedly isn't the sting site itself that causes the pain but rather a component in the venom that causes hypersensitivity so profound that almost all stimulus of the affected areas is interpreted as painful.

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Sir Azrael posted:

Thanks for this. I've heard so many conflicting reports about this species from "bee sting" to "omg fatal" that I've been tempted to just let the fucker tag me and let the gods sort it out for me. I figured if anyone was going to play it straight with me it would be the website for the wildlife service in Arizona, which essentially mirrors BC's assertion - that while nastily painful, their sting is highly unlikely to necessitate a hospital visit.

Fun fact about their venom: It reportedly isn't the sting site itself that causes the pain but rather a component in the venom that causes hypersensitivity so profound that almost all stimulus of the affected areas is interpreted as painful.

Here's my C. gracilis





I might get some A. mauritanicus or some flat rocks again some day, but otherwise, starting up another colony of gracilis will do for now.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

If I want a bit of light to better see my T while she is active at night, my best option would be some kind of red light I only turn on when I want to watch?

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

So I got a Chilean Rose today.

Sorry about the poor image quality.

Not sure about the sex yet. The employee at the store didn't know. I'll let it get settled in before sexing it. I set up the tank according to The Tarantula Keeper's Guide and Shultz's care sheet. She seems to be very docile.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Tahirovic: I have no idea!

Lobster: Awesome!

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

I finally have a decent picture of my G. rosea, whom I have named Ziggy.


Gonna let it settle in before I try sexing and/or handling them.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Looks female

anotherblownsave
Feb 26, 2008

The sponsors will like you better this way, trust me.



Newbie here, I just got my G. rosea yesterday, finally got a good picture of it today when it was out and about, it's about the size of a silver dollar. Here is a picture. Haven't named he/she yet. This is my first invert, and I'm pretty excited about it.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Tasty_Crayon
Jul 29, 2006
Same story, different version.



My Avic molted today and then immediatly started munching on the sex id parts. Why do they do that??

Desert Bus
May 9, 2004

Take 1 tablet by mouth daily.

Roaches really enjoy cucumber. Who would have guessed?

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Another blown save: Great first choice If you'd like help sexing it, post back here when it molts.

Tasty_crayon: Would you eat me? I'd eat me. (They're dirty bastards is why) I think it may have to do with reclaiming nutrients?

Desert Bus: Hissing roaches also love orange. Changing their food seems to have an effect on their frass, too. I feed mine cat food, and they smell pretty neutral to me and yet my business partners roaches get a lot of citrus and have a sweeter smell in general.

Have a picture:



This is my Monocentropus balfouri, Echidna. I'm hoping she is newly knocked up and will put out many beautiful babies.

anotherblownsave
Feb 26, 2008

The sponsors will like you better this way, trust me.



Sir Azrael posted:

Another blown save: Great first choice If you'd like help sexing it, post back here when it molts.


That's a beautiful spider you've got there. Thanks for the reassurance on the choice. I'll definitely post back when it molts. I'm amazed at how chill this spider is, I've had it out and just let it crawl up and down my arm for 10 minutes or so, and then it just wanted to sit on my hand and hang out.

Tasty_Crayon
Jul 29, 2006
Same story, different version.



Sir Azrael posted:




This is my Monocentropus balfouri, Echidna. I'm hoping she is newly knocked up and will put out many beautiful babies.

She looks like a bay Clydesdale. How is her temperament?

Here are my Avic's old jeans.





And his new pants:

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Tasty_Crayon posted:

She looks like a bay Clydesdale. How is her temperament?
Here are my Avic's old jeans.

The new duds are lookin' good! Shame about the sex id bits. Sometimes even a bad looking molt can be salvageable, adding a little dish soap to water and soaking the molt for a bit will allow you to tease it apart and is the first step in prepping a molt for sexing. Even if you're unsuccessful it is good practice and sometimes it's fun to display the molts. If you do them in sequence you get kind of a snapshot of your Ts growth over time. Especially if you get one as a bitty baby it is crazy the size difference between molts.

Anyhow, to answer your question regarding temperament I'll put something here I might add to the OP -

Typically, I have found that a tarantula will follow a number of escalating steps in avoidance of predators.

1. Remain still. Maybe I haven't been noticed.
2. poo poo, I've been detected. better run!
3. Can't run! Deploying chaff! (Ts with urticating hairs only)
4. Threat pose! (legs up, fangs separated, stridulating in some species)
5. Fire a warning shot... (thumping with front legs, mock strike)
6. CHOMP

Depending on temperament or mood, a T may skip some or all steps leading up to biting the poo poo out of you. This is not all bad. My G pulchripes, for instance, will not clam up or run but will rarely (and lazily) flick hairs as if defending itself should require as little effort as possible. Echidna, an OW T, will run at a good clip unless you get in her face - then she'll throw up her legs ever so briefly and then slap. I've seen her punt crickets around like little footballs. She has yet to bite however and if you don't surprise her she's simple enough to predict. My B vagans is another story. Since her last molt she's been a pretty hate machine. No warning, no flicking, no running. Just immediately jams her fangs into anything that comes near her.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

anotherblownsave posted:

That's a beautiful spider you've got there. Thanks for the reassurance on the choice. I'll definitely post back when it molts. I'm amazed at how chill this spider is, I've had it out and just let it crawl up and down my arm for 10 minutes or so, and then it just wanted to sit on my hand and hang out.

I've not noticed that my G. rosea (got her 4 weeks ago) is super lazy and calm. When I feed her she'll wait in her hide till those stupid crickets run to her. Why move for food if it comes to you?
She is an awesome eater so far, I've gotten her 4-5 crickets every week and she ate them all, except the last one this week, which she only killed.

On the topic of food, at my LPS I can get crickets, roaches and several kinds of worms. So far I've fed her crickets, but I hear roaches are healthier? What are the pros and cons of varying her diet a bit?

And am I right in thinking, it's impossible to overfeed a T?

Lava Lamp Goddess
Feb 19, 2007



So I acquired two hissing roaches and I'm in love. I was wondering if it's better to use a water dish or water crystals with them. I could always also get one of those big jars of Fluker's orange cubes if need be.

Also, is there a safe way to mark them to keep track of which roach is which? I know they will shed them off, but would a silver Sharpie or a small dot of nail polish be safe? If not it really doesn't matter right now since I can tell them apart by their sex but I'd like to keep track of individual roaches when they start breeding.

I have them in a medium kritter keeper right now with a spare 5 gallon to transfer to when they start reproducing. I have found the best way to keep their temp up is to sit them on my DVR box of all things. When I had dubias they bred like crazy from sitting on that DVR.

I also bought two praying mantis egg cases to fill our garden up with lil mantises when the weather finally gets warmer. I'd keep one inside to hatch but I just have visions of tons of baby mantises escaping and taking over the house...

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





Tahirovic posted:

I've not noticed that my G. rosea (got her 4 weeks ago) is super lazy and calm. When I feed her she'll wait in her hide till those stupid crickets run to her. Why move for food if it comes to you?
She is an awesome eater so far, I've gotten her 4-5 crickets every week and she ate them all, except the last one this week, which she only killed.

On the topic of food, at my LPS I can get crickets, roaches and several kinds of worms. So far I've fed her crickets, but I hear roaches are healthier? What are the pros and cons of varying her diet a bit?

And am I right in thinking, it's impossible to overfeed a T?

You can overfeed them. Basically, their abdomen can get large enough it'll drag on the substrate and create scarring damage that is likely to rip when they molt. Considering it is right by their book lungs, you can imagine how that ends.

A varied diet is almost always better, and roaches are less likely to chew on a tarantula than a cricket.

Desert Bus
May 9, 2004

Take 1 tablet by mouth daily.

Lava Lamp Goddess posted:

So I acquired two hissing roaches and I'm in love. I was wondering if it's better to use a water dish or water crystals with them. I could always also get one of those big jars of Fluker's orange cubes if need be.

No clue on the rest of your questions, but for my roaches I use the lid from a food container as a water dish. The plastic kind with a roughly 1/8th inch ledge. I think I'm using a cottage cheese lid. It's too shallow for them to drown in. It evaporates fast, but I also feed food with moisture in it.

Cless Alvein
May 25, 2007
Bloopity Bloo

Buy an $8 bag of water crystals from Home Depot or something and you'll be set for basically forever.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Lava Lamp Goddess posted:

Also, is there a safe way to mark them to keep track of which roach is which? I know they will shed them off, but would a silver Sharpie or a small dot of nail polish be safe? If not it really doesn't matter right now since I can tell them apart by their sex but I'd like to keep track of individual roaches when they start breeding.

Near as I can tell, either of those should be reasonably safe. Beekeepers use similar methods to mark their queens, the first youtube video I brought up showed a guy that used those sharpie paint markers. It used to be a thing to bedazzle the little guys and wear them as living brooches!

Here are mine: two females named Geiger and Mueller. Bonus: My wife's hands.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

So summer is approaching and the temps in my apartment are rising, A/C is not really a thing in Europe, so my G. rosea will soon have to suffer the 30ish degrees. I read that higher temperatures affect the spider's metabolism, does this mean I'll have to feed her more or more often?

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Tahirovic posted:

So summer is approaching and the temps in my apartment are rising, A/C is not really a thing in Europe, so my G. rosea will soon have to suffer the 30ish degrees. I read that higher temperatures affect the spider's metabolism, does this mean I'll have to feed her more or more often?

G rosea are no stranger to high temperatures, and should not present you with any particular difficulty. Even though she may be more active, there shouldn't be a massive spike in food requirement. I would recommend feeding as normal until/unless her abdomen starts to obviously shrink. As a general rule, I think it is better to risk underfeeding than overfeed, to my Ts chagrin, I'm sure, but not to their detriment .

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


My wife works at the Savannah Children's Museum and is wanting to put together a "Bug Fest" on the 4th of May. I have some tailless whips, African giant millipedes, and a big goldknee T, but I'd love to get a hold of maybe 3-5 adult hissers, giant cave roaches, emperor scorpions, ivory millipedes, or death feigning beetles. If you have any, please let me know.

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Pardalis
Dec 26, 2008

The Amazing Dreadheaded Chameleon Keeper


I wish I could help! If you ever have baby giant millipedes, I would love to buy them. You should definitely find some species of phasmids and mantids if you can! They are super interesting, especially for kids. A favorite is Aussie prickly stick insects.

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