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Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Pardalis posted:

I wish I could help! If you ever have baby giant millipedes, I would love to buy them. You should definitely find some species of phasmids and mantids if you can! They are super interesting, especially for kids. A favorite is Aussie prickly stick insects.

My giant millies are only about 4.5 inches at the moment, but they're growing fast. I think all non-native phasmids are illegal in georgia, unfortunately. I'm going to go out this weekend bug hunting. Already found an eyed click beetle, so I'm off to a good start.

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Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

I'd totally love some giant millipedes, but the market seems to have dried up since you're not allowed to import them anymore (IIRC?). Are there wide-ranging bans on them? I figured they were legal here and didn't even bother to look into it when I was reading about them and checked out some of the common bug dealers for info.

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Delta-Wye posted:

I'd totally love some giant millipedes, but the market seems to have dried up since you're not allowed to import them anymore (IIRC?). Are there wide-ranging bans on them? I figured they were legal here and didn't even bother to look into it when I was reading about them and checked out some of the common bug dealers for info.

I had the opportunity to import some a while back, but the red tape involved made it not worth it. They wanted to quarantine them at a university or some poo poo for like 6 weeks before I could get them.

About 10 or 15 years ago I bought some for like $10 each, now they're like $85-$125 each.

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





I think the country of origin for African giant millipedes is the issue; seems like milli's from other countries can be brought in fine, but BC would know better.

Non-native Phasmids are illegal throughout the US. Institutions can get permits to keep them, but not individuals. I've also heard antedotally that the further south you are, the harder it is to get the permits (basically more of a fear of colonization of any escapees.) Even native ones make people a little iffy, since while it is legal, you might have to prove they are native. Similarlly, a lot of people don't like talking about owning mantids too much on open sites because of the close relationship between phasmids and mantids. Mantids are legal to own on a federal level, but check state laws esp. regarding native species. General rule of thumb, always check state and local laws. One of the nearby counties in MD bans all exotic pets for example.

I've had to yell at people on Fauna classifieds selling exotic phamids, and they won't believe me until I straight up linked the USDA rules from the .gov site. That was a few years ago though.

Oh, sidenote. Guy in Ask/Tell on brewing mentioned using mealworms in a brew for the Nordic food lab. This planted a seed in my head, and I think I'm going to try to make a summer Saison with the Brood 2 cicadas when they emerge soon. Figure I'll use ginger, grapefruit peel and/or orange peel for some citrus flavor. Hopefully it'll be good.

ZarathustraFollower fucked around with this message at 00:29 on Apr 24, 2013

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


ZarathustraFollower posted:

I think the country of origin for African giant millipedes is the issue; seems like milli's from other countries can be brought in fine, but BC would know better.

Non-native Phasmids are illegal throughout the US. Institutions can get permits to keep them, but not individuals. I've also heard antedotally that the further south you are, the harder it is to get the permits (basically more of a fear of colonization of any escapees.) Even native ones make people a little iffy, since while it is legal, you might have to prove they are native. Similarlly, a lot of people don't like talking about owning mantids too much on open sites because of the close relationship between phasmids and mantids. Mantids are legal to own on a federal level, but check state laws esp. regarding native species. General rule of thumb, always check state and local laws. One of the nearby counties in MD bans all exotic pets for example.

I've had to yell at people on Fauna classifieds selling exotic phamids, and they won't believe me until I straight up linked the USDA rules from the .gov site. That was a few years ago though.

Oh, sidenote. Guy in Ask/Tell on brewing mentioned using mealworms in a brew for the Nordic food lab. This planted a seed in my head, and I think I'm going to try to make a summer Saison with the Brood 2 cicadas when they emerge soon. Figure I'll use ginger, grapefruit peel and/or orange peel for some citrus flavor. Hopefully it'll be good.

When I was looking to do the import from Kenya, there was no issue with any other inverts, just the millies. It's because of the fear of introducing exotic plant eating inverts. Phasmids are especially prohibited due to the fact that many are parthenogenic.

Mantids are fine because the ecological impact of a small insect predator is much smaller than a phasmid, millie, or some other potentionally damaging invert.

UltraGrey
Feb 24, 2007

Eat a grass.
Have a barf.



Hey guys I've been wondering lately, what ever happened to Crikey IRL?

CarpenterWalrus
Mar 30, 2010

The Lazy Satanist


Hey, guys, I love this thread and all the great info and pics therein! I've had an Emperor scorpion since December of 2012, so for about five months now. I keep him(?) in a twenty gallon long tank with plenty of burrows/hiding places and keep the tank at about 75-80 degrees and anywhere from 75 to 85 percent humididty. He's got lots of natural, live moss to keep the humidity, plenty of substrate to burrow, and a small Exo-Terra waterfall feature for his water/climbing needs. He's been eating fairly regularly up until a couple weeks ago. Since then, he's been hiding in his burrow (an Exo-Terra magnetic rock den) and refusing food. I've been assuming he's been prepping up to molt, but when he emerged yesterday, he was missing a leg and had not molted. I looked all over for the missing appendage, but it was nowhere to be found. I realize that, without pictures, the advice you guys have may be limited, but is there anything you can tell me that might shed some light on this mystery? Is there anything I can do to improve his quality of life or make the habitat safer? Will he grow his leg back? To clarify, he doesn't seem to be wounded, just missing the leg.

Voltin Bolt
Oct 17, 2004

IT DOES NOT FIX

Speaking of missing legs, I'll quote myself here from the spider safe thread since this one is more active -

Voltin Bolt posted:

I finally got off my rear end and started work on my spider drawing tutorial (I've had the notes sitting around for two years at this point) but I'm a little stuck for references for a couple of the anatomy illustrations. The tutorial is meant for learning to draw all types of spiders and will feature illustrated examples of lots of sorts.

My problem - I chose a tarantula specifically for the large labeled anatomy reference shots because they've got a well-defined carapace / mouthparts / etc... but I got to the pedicel and I'm like, poo poo. It's really drat hard to find any visible photo references for what a T's pedicel looks like because it's so short, they're so fluffy, and the 4th legs are always in the way. Here are my sketches for this section so far:

I'm happy with the top and bottom shots (I think the lungs might be a little off, but within reasonable parameters afaik) but the whole waist situation on the profile view is really bugging me. I've got the feeling I made what's visible of the pedicel too thick here but it's impossible to tell without a decent reference

Does anybody have any good references for that tiny part? Pictures of a T missing one of its 4th legs would be best but I couldn't find any. Also if you happen to see any glaring anatomical errors that I missed please point them out

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





CarpenterWalrus posted:

Hey, guys, I love this thread and all the great info and pics therein! I've had an Emperor scorpion since December of 2012, so for about five months now. I keep him(?) in a twenty gallon long tank with plenty of burrows/hiding places and keep the tank at about 75-80 degrees and anywhere from 75 to 85 percent humididty. He's got lots of natural, live moss to keep the humidity, plenty of substrate to burrow, and a small Exo-Terra waterfall feature for his water/climbing needs. He's been eating fairly regularly up until a couple weeks ago. Since then, he's been hiding in his burrow (an Exo-Terra magnetic rock den) and refusing food. I've been assuming he's been prepping up to molt, but when he emerged yesterday, he was missing a leg and had not molted. I looked all over for the missing appendage, but it was nowhere to be found. I realize that, without pictures, the advice you guys have may be limited, but is there anything you can tell me that might shed some light on this mystery? Is there anything I can do to improve his quality of life or make the habitat safer? Will he grow his leg back? To clarify, he doesn't seem to be wounded, just missing the leg.

Were there crickets in the cage at the time it lost a leg? Could be an injury from that. If not, it might have just gotten stuck and pulled the leg off itself to get free. Do you know how old it is? Scorpions molt a specific amount of times until they hit adulthood (so in some species, the 7th molt would be the final one for example) if it is young and going to molt more times, it could regrow the leg. If it is an adult, it won't, although lacking one leg isn't going to affect it at all.

Voltin, I don't have any pics like that, but at worst you could ask on arachnoboards. By sheer volume, someone on there should have a taranula missing that leg. Have you tried to look at photos of a taranula molting? The lack of colouration in much of the exoskeleton might help highlight joints. If you ask around, someone could probably mail you an old molt too.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

I am not sure if you can find it online, but in Schultz' Tarantula Keeper's guide there is at least one picture of a spider missing part of a leg.

CarpenterWalrus
Mar 30, 2010

The Lazy Satanist


There was one rather large cricket in there at the time. When I discovered the missing leg, I immediately removed the cricket. Again, I looked all over the hab for the leg, but found nothing. Is it possible the cricket ate the leg entirely? Seems unlikely, but I don't know. I don't have any idea how old the scorpion (Bartleby) is, and neither would the shop-keeps. He's about four inches from claw to curve of tail, so I don't think he's fully grown, yet. But, I've had him for a little over five months now and no molt. Should I be more worried?

Voltin Bolt
Oct 17, 2004

IT DOES NOT FIX

Molts won't work since the exuviae tears apart pretty much right at that point I've also got the guide right here, it's one of my reference books I've been using for the project illustrations, but it doesn't have any photos that show that particular angle unfortunately.

Hardwood Floor
Sep 25, 2011



Hey guys, a friend of mine has been catching some spiders in her house and needs help IDing them. I'm not really good at identifying inverts so I figured I'd ask here.
Some things about them:
-They ball up when threatened
-They weave webs
-She's found about 4 so far in the same area of her house (her bathroom)
-She lives in the northeastern US.

Here's some pictures of them, they're quite tiny!



Defensive posture:

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


I have this "rotting log" mini ecosystem I made. It has mostly pillbugs, sowbugs, springtails, mites, and all kinds of other critters living in it. Today I peeked in and saw a resident I hadn't seen before...

A Psuedoscorpion!

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

Pseudoscorpions are so cool. They're tiny dust mite eating friends!

I've heard that you can leave a damp towel in a dry part of your basement to attract them.

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Improbable Lobster posted:

Pseudoscorpions are so cool. They're tiny dust mite eating friends!

I've heard that you can leave a damp towel in a dry part of your basement to attract them.

I haven't seen one in years. It's been feeding off the springtails and baby isopods in my little experiment. Some of my fruitflies have escaped from my dart frog tanks and made their way into the container so I'm sure the little guy has gotten a few of those too.

Mr. Vile
Nov 25, 2009

And, where there is treasure, there will be Air Pirates.


My Dubias finally got here! I've got them all set up with the standard egg crates and rubbermaid setup, along with trays of high-protein cat food and water gel. They can eat the food just fine without me grinding it into powder, right? I see it ground up in a lot of tutorials, but it seems kinda ridiculous to me that a scavenger like a roach can't chew its own drat food.

UltraGrey
Feb 24, 2007

Eat a grass.
Have a barf.



Mr. Vile posted:

My Dubias finally got here! I've got them all set up with the standard egg crates and rubbermaid setup, along with trays of high-protein cat food and water gel. They can eat the food just fine without me grinding it into powder, right? I see it ground up in a lot of tutorials, but it seems kinda ridiculous to me that a scavenger like a roach can't chew its own drat food.

They can but they much much much prefer softer foods. If I give them something like hard cat or dog food I always put it in a little shallow dish/cup or something to soak it in. Sometimes I'll take a deli cup and cut it down to just make a very shallow dish.

Do you have a heat light on them or under tank heater?

Mr. Vile
Nov 25, 2009

And, where there is treasure, there will be Air Pirates.


Greycious posted:

They can but they much much much prefer softer foods. If I give them something like hard cat or dog food I always put it in a little shallow dish/cup or something to soak it in. Sometimes I'll take a deli cup and cut it down to just make a very shallow dish.

Do you have a heat light on them or under tank heater?

Hmm, maybe I'll soak it or grind it up, then.

Yeah, I got a plastics-safe heat mat and thermostat and it's staying at a nice warm 90F or so.

Cless Alvein
May 25, 2007
Bloopity Bloo

I use plastic mason jar lids as dishes Works really well. I mostly give mine a ground mixture of cat food, alfalfa,powdered milk, and vit powder. Basically cricket chow. Along with that I'll toss in some citrus fruit. Occasionally when the gecko gets a baby food treat, so do the roaches. They go to town on that dish. Mine don't have their own heating source anymore. They did until they got moved to sit right below a snake tank. So they use that for heat. I had their pad turned out after the move at first, but I started to have a few deaths. Nothing since then.

Mr. Vile
Nov 25, 2009

And, where there is treasure, there will be Air Pirates.


Cless Alvein posted:

I use plastic mason jar lids as dishes Works really well. I mostly give mine a ground mixture of cat food, alfalfa,powdered milk, and vit powder. Basically cricket chow. Along with that I'll toss in some citrus fruit. Occasionally when the gecko gets a baby food treat, so do the roaches. They go to town on that dish. Mine don't have their own heating source anymore. They did until they got moved to sit right below a snake tank. So they use that for heat. I had their pad turned out after the move at first, but I started to have a few deaths. Nothing since then.

I just used some plastic tupperware type things and sandpapered the sides so they can climb on it. It seems to work fine, they can get in and out of them easily.

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

I'm not sure if this is the right place to mention it but a pet shop near me is closing. All of their inverts are 50% off and if any goons are in or near the Mississauga area it might be worth checking out. Their site is Here. It's where I got my G. rosea.

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





Improbable Lobster posted:

I'm not sure if this is the right place to mention it but a pet shop near me is closing. All of their inverts are 50% off and if any goons are in or near the Mississauga area it might be worth checking out. Their site is Here. It's where I got my G. rosea.

I can see why they are closing. Their sale prices are about what I would be willing to pay for most of that stuff from a normal pet store. Seriously, asking $60 for a vinegaroon is crazy.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN




It's the same with the amphibians. I've sold animals for less than their sale prices, and their regular prices - really, $70 for an axolotl? I'd charge similar for two animals, with shipping included. It feels like they took the price the breeder charged them (without getting a quantity discount) and doubled it.

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





So for $50 I just got the following off craigslist:

Slings:
B. Boehmei
2 P. irminia
P. pulcher
G. pulchripes
G. pulchra
an unknown adult chilean tarantula (Looks like a scrofa and about the right size, but waiting for a molt.)
and a massive dubia colony, all in their tanks. All in all, a good find I would say.

Olive Bar
Mar 30, 2005

Take me to the moon

I am so incredibly jealous.

Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

That sounds very cheap, I am looking into getting a juvie G. pulchripes as my second T and they seem to cost around 40-60$ here.
Setups and care sheets make it sound like G. pulchripes and G. rosea have about the same requirements, or is there much of a difference?

Fake edit: my G. rosea seems to be doing well, other than putting substrate into her water dish every now and then.

Olive Bar
Mar 30, 2005

Take me to the moon

I just traded my MM C. cyaneopubescens for an A. geniculata, very happy.

Geology
Nov 6, 2005



My girlfriend teaches first grade and I'm tarantula-sitting her class pet while she's travelling over the summer. Mylie is a G. Rosea and she's my first arthropod. Turns out she's been receiving proper care, according to the OP, but I bought the Schultz book anyway. I've only had her for a week and already I'm in love.

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

One of usssssssssss

A Sleepy Budgie
Jan 6, 2010

A friend in need
is a friend indeed


Does anyone know of any spider rescues in the Washington, Idaho, or Montana area? I'm thinking of getting a spider and I don't really want to buy one from a pet store. I don't like to support pet stores...I've been looking on craigslist, but haven't really seen anything. I also don't want to pay to a whole new setup either.

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





A Sleepy Budgie posted:

Does anyone know of any spider rescues in the Washington, Idaho, or Montana area? I'm thinking of getting a spider and I don't really want to buy one from a pet store. I don't like to support pet stores...I've been looking on craigslist, but haven't really seen anything. I also don't want to pay to a whole new setup either.

I've never heard of a spider rescue anywhere. If you've a good local pet store, talk to them. Back in Austin if a tarantula came in weird (injured, or in the worst case paralyzed from a pepsis wasp) they'd hold it for me to see if I could get it back up to health. A set up should be <$10 if you do it right. Get a display container from any store, heat up a nail and use that to melt air holes into the plastic (you can drill it as an alternative, but I feel that leaves too sharp of an edge) and a brick of coco-nut fiber should be $5 at a decent pet store. Water dish can be a cap from a soda bottle or milk carton. Hide can be just any old thing you have laying around, or just get a flat rock from outside and dig a divet under it. Bam, done.

(Sterilize anything from outside first using some cleaning spray and rinsing it a lot).

That's for a terrestrial tarantula. Arboreal might not even need substrate, and for either an arboreal or burrowing tarantula those tall cereal containers work decent.

ZarathustraFollower fucked around with this message at 20:44 on Jun 15, 2013

Voltin Bolt
Oct 17, 2004

IT DOES NOT FIX

ZarathustraFollower posted:

I've never heard of a spider rescue anywhere.
Here's the only one I've heard of, though it's in Ohio, Rescued Rosies.

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

Guess who got a second tarantula today? (Don't guess, it was me)

I got a Ephebopus murinus (Skeleton tarantula). I'm not sure of the sex (I suspect male, though it lacks the boxing glove pedipalps) but it is gorgeous and seems to be taking to its new home pretty well. I gave it a similar setup to my G. rosea and I'm letting it settle into its home before I start feeding it. Have I made a grave mistake? It didn't reared or other seemed agressive/'upset' when I moved it into the proper tank.

Big Centipede
Mar 20, 2009

it tingles


Improbable Lobster posted:

Guess who got a second tarantula today? (Don't guess, it was me)

I got a Ephebopus murinus (Skeleton tarantula). I'm not sure of the sex (I suspect male, though it lacks the boxing glove pedipalps) but it is gorgeous and seems to be taking to its new home pretty well. I gave it a similar setup to my G. rosea and I'm letting it settle into its home before I start feeding it. Have I made a grave mistake? It didn't reared or other seemed agressive/'upset' when I moved it into the proper tank.

I've never had an E. murinus, but I've had a few E.cyanognathus before and I kept them quite a bit more humid than a rosie would like.

Here's a caresheet

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?157418-Blue-Fang-Care-Sheet

edit: oh yeah.... you were talking about E. murinus

http://atshq.org/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=23511

Big Centipede fucked around with this message at 06:38 on Jun 26, 2013

Sir Azrael
Jan 14, 2004

Locked, cocked, and polygonally rifled... This creature fears nothing.

Improbable Lobster posted:

Guess who got a second tarantula today? (Don't guess, it was me)

I got a Ephebopus murinus (Skeleton tarantula). I'm not sure of the sex (I suspect male, though it lacks the boxing glove pedipalps) but it is gorgeous and seems to be taking to its new home pretty well. I gave it a similar setup to my G. rosea and I'm letting it settle into its home before I start feeding it. Have I made a grave mistake? It didn't reared or other seemed agressive/'upset' when I moved it into the proper tank.

E. murinus likes:

- High humidity
- Lots of substrate to burrow
- Heavily webbing the entrance to its burrow
- Having urticating hairs on its pedipalps

Improbable Lobster
Jan 6, 2012

What is the Matrix? We just don't know.



Buglord

Sir Azrael posted:

E. murinus likes:

- High humidity
- Lots of substrate to burrow
- Heavily webbing the entrance to its burrow
- Having urticating hairs on its pedipalps


Big Centipede posted:

I've never had an E. murinus, but I've had a few E.cyanognathus before and I kept them quite a bit more humid than a rosie would like.

Here's a caresheet

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?157418-Blue-Fang-Care-Sheet

edit: oh yeah.... you were talking about E. murinus

http://atshq.org/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=23511

Thanks. I guess I'll get to work on setting up a basic burrow.

Scarlet Hawthorne
Jul 12, 2013


Really excited about this invertebrate threat!

Earlier this month I received some cecropia moth eggs and Iím eager to share.

Order: Lepidoptera (Moths, butterflies, skippers, etc.)
Family: Saturniidae (Silk Moths)
Hyalophora cecropia, Linnaeus 1758

Cecropia moths are a fairly common species in the North America, these individuals are from the Midwest. Theyíre well known for the gorgeous coloration of adults. Theyíre among the largest moths in North America with a wingspan of 4.25 Ė 6 in (110 - 150 cm). The only, obvious, physical difference between the sexes are the plumose antennae of the males. These sensitive antennae allow the males to detect female sex pheromone from miles away.


Please excuse this terrible phone pic.

But my favorites are the caterpillars! The larvae go through 5 larval instars (growing phase between molts). The 4th instar is spectacular; a plump green hotdog with a series of spiky red and yellow knobs running down its back (Iíll post pictures of these in a few weeks).

Iíve been feeding them silver maple leaves but Iíve tried a few others and they seem to be big fans of black cherry leaves. (Host range includes: dogwood, poplar, cherries, box elder, buckthorn, larch, apple, hawthorn, birch, elderberry, silver maple, alder, willow, privet and peony)

The 1st instar caterpillars were about the size of long grain rice and all black.



Theyíre currently in 2nd instar. The largest is about the size of a Good ní Plenty and they now have yellow bodies with black spots and projections.



Iíll try to take pictures of all of the instars and eventually the cocoons to share their progress.

Bouseman, J. K. and J. G. Sternburg. 2002. Field Guide to Silkmoths of Illinois. pp. 69-74. Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL.

Pardalis
Dec 26, 2008

The Amazing Dreadheaded Chameleon Keeper


Those moths are gorgeous! I just found a bunch of tansy worms that turn into Cinnabar moths. They are really pretty:


I also just got a dermestarium and have started cleaning bones. I will snap some pics once I get it set up...outside. They are cleaning a quail for me right now.

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Scarlet Hawthorne
Jul 12, 2013


That cinnabar moth is beautiful, I've never seen a tiger moth like that. Looked up the caterpillars and they're really cute too!

Pardalis posted:


I also just got a dermestarium and have started cleaning bones. I will snap some pics once I get it set up...outside. They are cleaning a quail for me right now.

That's awesome. One of my friends set up something similar in her backyard and got great results. I think she ended up with carrion beetles and a few other critters along the way but totally worth it; the deer and opossum skulls looked great.

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