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Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

I have a copy of Inspectres sitting around my apartment. It's a sort of "Discount Ghostbusters" RPG, with a focus on player narration driving the plot of the current mission. The creator touts that the GM never has to do any prep, but I'm not so sure. Ran it once, and I might be able to put together a critique of it. Would the thread be interested in hearing about surprisingly unforgiving damage systems and unclear rules mixed together with a Second String Ghost Hunter flavor? And there's a Franchise Management aspect too, oddly enough.

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Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Inspectres: “Because it’s not just a vampiric infestation – It’s your vampiric infestation!”
Part 1



Inspectres is a game written by Jared Sorenson, and published in 2009 by Memento Mori Theatricks. The illustrations are by Jon Morris and Manning L. Krull. It’s a sort of comedy-horror take on Ghostbusters combined with some mechanics that hearken to Reality Ghost TV, like Paranormal State, Ghost Hunters, or A Haunting. I’ve only run the game once, but I think I should be able to give my honest opinion about what I like and dislike with the system. Feel free to disagree with me (or correct me!) if you’ve played it and think I got something wrong. It’s a pretty short book (80 pages), and is relatively rules-light, so we’ll see how much I can eke out of it.

I will say this now, though: overall, I think it’s a fun idea, but there are some glaring problems with certain aspects of the rules. That’s for a later update, though. Let’s start at the beginning, shall we?

The Premise of Inspectres
In the world of Inspectres, supernatural and paranormal events are on the rise, so much so that they are well-documented, recognized, and enough of an annoyance that there is a market for removal services. Inspectres, Inc. is a small startup/franchise chain that’s attempting to fill this niche. The players themselves take the role of the poor saps who’ve decided that hunting these ghosts and ghouls (and mummies, and aliens, etc.) is better than a 9-5 job.

The actual setting of the game is left essentially entirely open, although the baseline setting is some urban/metropolitan area. There’s no reason that the game won’t work in a rural area, though. The reason for the wide-open setting is that the players and GM often trade off in narrating and setting the scenes, based upon the success or failure of skill rolls, but that’s for another post. The author calls his game “collaborative storytelling without a net.”

He’s wrong, because there is a net, and it’s made of razor wire. Again, we’ll deal with that a bit later.

Character Creation


Employee of the month.

The character creation section is fairly brief. It first advises the players to create a name and basic personality for their character, including a former occupation. Players are encouraged to try and keep their characters at least somewhat grounded, since Inspectres, Inc. is a business, and is probably not going to hire crazy gun nuts or completely antisocial people. Of course, there are always exceptions. Players also select a talent for their character, which represents a special area of expertise.

The meat of character creation is assigning your skills. Characters get 9d6 to assign between 4 skills, which are:
*Academics – Used for researching forbidden tomes, theorizing, and recalling important facts.

*Athletics – Running, Jumping, Punching, Flexing. Also covers most any form of combat.

*Technology – Fixing stuff, rigging up ghost-traps, and using high-technology weapons like Proton Packs and the like. Technology is also used when determining what equipment you can purchase or have access to. No reason for the low-tech party to have a Mini-Large Hadron Collider!

*Contact – Literally your ability to talk to people, generally clients. It’s specifically stated that it’s not for use on anything but normal people.
Inspectres, Inc. is a “shoot first” kind of operation when it comes to creepy-crawlies.

No skill can have more than 4 dice in it, or less than 1. So by necessity, you’ll probably end up with a relatively balanced character.

Talents are an additional perk that every character has. They represent an additional area of expertise, and grant a character an extra die to roll whenever it would apply to a skill. Following the game’s somewhat freeform philosophy, Talents can apply to any skill area, as long as it makes a certain degree of sense. The book gives a couple examples:

Inspectres Rules posted:

So if your ex-mechanic gets into a scrap, boost your Athletics roll by using a monkey wrench as a weapon. If your agent is sexy as all-get-out, maybe you can get the team a good deal on a used car (a bonus to the Technology roll).

Skills never improve their base values. Instead, players can accrue bonus dice of various kinds, which can be applied to rolls. I think that this post is long enough, though, so I’ll cover that in the future. We'll also be getting into some of the more problematic stuff soon.

NEXT TIME: We learn how to run a business.


Put it all on the company card.

Green Intern fucked around with this message at 20:23 on Apr 3, 2013

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

HitTheTargets posted:

Who did the art for Inspectres? Kinda reminds me of Matt Digges, I think.

The credits list two artists: Jon Morris and Manning L. Krull.

All of the art (except the logo, which is by "Fufu Frauenwahl") in my first write-up post is by Jon Morris, because I don't see it listed with Krull's stuff in his gallery.

I'll add the artist credits to the initial description.

Edit: Fufu Frauenwahl's gallery is awesome. They should have illustrated this whole book.

Green Intern fucked around with this message at 22:19 on Apr 2, 2013

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

ProfessorProf posted:

Giant Allege is, in its own words, a "Heart-Pounding Robot Courtroom RPG"

Is this the latest installment in the Ace Attorney series? I want to see more!

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Inspectres: Fighting the Forces of Darkness so you don’t have to!
Part 2
Taxman, leave me alone: Franchises in Inspectres.

So last time, I went over the basics of making a character. This time I’ll cover another important aspects of the game: creating your Inspectres Franchise.


How can we help you today?

Your group of Inspectres Agents isn’t just some motley crew of paranormal investigators – they’re a motley crew with a company credit card. The strength and resources of your franchise are something that actually have an effect on skill rolls within a given mission.
Franchises are created after everyone has made their character, and the author has provided some helpful questions to get players thinking about what they want out of their business, including:

• How big is your franchise? How long have you been in operation?
• Are you the Main Office? An established franchise? A start-up operation?
• Where is your franchise located? How many people work there?
• Who runs the show? A board of directors or the agents themselves?
• Do investors privately fund it or did you all max out your credit cards?
• What does your franchise look like? What amenities does it feature?
• Are you the only InSpectres franchise in the area? Are there any competitors?
• What kinds of gear do you have access to? What do you use for transportation?
• Do you have a specialty (ghosts, vampires, demons, crypto-zoology)?

These are all very reasonable questions, and I’m glad that they’re there. New players especially might not be as comfortable roleplaying or getting invested in a game setting.

The Technology skill also comes into play during this process – the GM is instructed to ask players to roll Technology whenever a significant piece of equipment or detail comes up. A new copy-machine might require a minor success on the roll (rolling a 4. More specifics in a later post), while a state-of-the-art ectomorph containment unit might require something more major (rolling a 5 or 6). In addition, succeeding on these Tech rolls allows players to elaborate further on the purchased equipment. It’s all up to negotiation between the players and GM, of course, as are most things in the game.

Players are also encouraged to decide who should be the Chief Executive/Financial/Technical Officer, along with any other positions that they might want to include. These don’t grant any special abilities, but they do help inform roleplaying decisions, and could conceivably be the spark for some good interaction between players.


Unless of course, all of the players decide that the CEO gets some kind of SMG as a perk. Then it matters.


After deciding the flavor details of the franchise, the players get to decide the dice pools – yes, more dice pools! This stage of making a franchise is very much like making a character, which is a good move on the part of the designer. The players are given a certain number off Franchise Dice to distribute, ranging from 5d6 for a completely new branch, all the way up to 30d6 for The Main Office. You could have more, I guess, but that’s “just silly” as the rules say.

Like with characters, there are different areas to divvy up dice for a Franchise. The difference is that there are no restrictions on the number of dice in the three categories, unlike with skills. The categories are as follows:

• Library Card – The library card represents academic resources, like access to the Inspectres Main Database, or an archive of dusty old occult tomes. It is used to add dice to Academics rolls.
• Gym Card – The gym card represents access to training facilities, firing ranges, and really nice swimming pools. It is used to add dice to Athletics rolls.
• Credit Card – The credit card represents…a credit card. Its only use is to help you purchase new and dangerous technology, and to cover the costs of technical training. It can be used to add dice to Technology rolls.

It’s recommended that players divvy their dice up according to the strengths of the team, but there’s nothing stopping players from dumping all of their dice into the Gym Card, so they can have the buffest agents. Any dice that are not assigned to one of these three categories go into…

The Bank – Dice in the bank can be added to any skill roll, which might make you think that you should dump all your Franchise Dice in there so that you can have maximum flexibility. That’s not a good idea, though, because dice can be lost during gameplay, both to bad Bank Dice rolls and to Stress, which is essentially the GM’s way of dealing damage. Dice in the Bank can be used to alleviate the effects of Stress, but this also removes them from play. You can imagine why it might not be a great idea to spend them all over the place.

I’ll talk more about Stress, skill checks, and how to complete missions in the next post, since they’re strongly linked, and I've got a fair bit to say about them. For now, let’s make some characters, and set them up with a Franchise.


Dipper Pines

Academics: 4d6
Athletics: 1d6
Technology: 2d6
Contact: 2d6
Talent: Sneezes like a Kitten

Mabel Pines

Academics: 1d6
Athletics: 2d6
Technology: 2d6
Contact: 4d6
Talent: Aggressively Optimistic

Soos

Academics: 1d6
Athletics: 3d6
Technology: 3d6
Contact: 2d6
Talent: Amiable Sidekick with a Pickup Truck

Inspectres Franchise Dice
-Library Card: 2d6
-Gym Card: 2d6
-Credit Card: 0
-Bank: 1d6

So Mabel and Dipper operate a very small branch out of their Grunkle Stan’s Mystery Shack. They have some access to occult lore, and a lot of places they can run around and get prepared for all the physical exertion of missions. They're totally out of cash, though. At least they have an Amiable Sidekick with a Pickup Truck! We’ll see how they get into (and out of) trouble in the next update, when we get into the real mechanics of the game. It’s going to get messy.

Green Intern fucked around with this message at 21:33 on Apr 3, 2013

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

404GoonNotFound posted:

The fact that Soos does not have a statblock is a crime against humanity :arghfist::spergin:

Don't say I never gave you anything.

Soos

Academics: 1d6
Athletics: 3d6
Technology: 3d6
Contact: 2d6
Talent: Amiable Sidekick with a Pickup Truck

Green Intern fucked around with this message at 21:33 on Apr 3, 2013

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

All those alternate options for the other races are, again, drawn from Japanese Yokai stories. Of course, they're terribly out of context, but I'm pretty amused they included the Seto Taisho. Little dishware warriors made of discarded and unloved cookware. They can be easily smashed, but will always come back once there's enough broken plates and crap hanging around.

What's with all the creepy sex poo poo, though?

Edit: Actually, there's a ton of sex and woman-related yokai in Japanese mythology. Fields is just being hyper-creepy about it.

Green Intern fucked around with this message at 14:14 on Apr 4, 2013

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Humbug Scoolbus posted:

I want to see a real Yokai based game now...Fields is making cool concepts awful. :smith:

Yokai are awesome, and a Japanese Ghost/Yokai Hunter game would be amazing.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

I am amazed at how each and every one of those talents seem to reach a new and terrifying level of creepiness.

That pissing into the sea one sounds perfect for a Drunken Sailor/Sorceror.

In other news, I'll be doing my next Inspectres post tomorrow.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Inspectres: Who ya gonna call (when you don’t have any money)?
Part 3


Some Disassembly Required

Skills, Stress, and How to Succeed at Missions!
We’re finally getting to the more mechanical side of things. We’re also getting to the part of the game system where I feel there are some serious design flaws, so that’s fun. This might be the last post I do, since there's not much else to the system beyond some supplemental bits.

Missions and You
Obviously, every Inspectres Franchise needs to actually get paid in order to survive and thrive. A mission is basically one session of play (this game really lends itself to one-shot adventures, but you could definitely string several together into a longer overall campaign)

Game flow generally follows this helpful list:
Employee Interviews – Did I forget to mention this earlier? The author suggests having confessional booth-style interviews to introduce characters to the party. My players really enjoyed their fake job interviews. The Confessionals are even suggested as an aid to developing scenes later in the game, if things are getting stagnant, or if someone has a funny or inventive way of adding something to the scene. Always adding, never detracting.
Getting the Call – A client contacts the Inspectres with their problem. This can be randomly generated from a table ( roll 2d6 on each column), or the GM can present something they’ve cooked up.

Oh Boy! The Horny Housewife heard a Haunting at the HStore!

Research/Investigation – Research or Investigate the problem, to try and figure out an explanation or solution. Players will be rolling Academics here, more often than not.
Suiting Up – Procuring all the equipment and gadgets they might need to deal with the problem. Or any other preparatory stuff for the actual mission. So Tech rolls to invent or purchase new gear. Contact to bargain with shady scientists. Athletics to steal poo poo from military labs. You get the idea.
Fieldwork – Traveling to the job site itself, and solving the problem. This will necessarily have to follow from what the players have determined in the previous parts.
Cleaning Up – Transfer Franchise Dice to Cards or to the Bank.
Vacation – Spend dice to remove stress penalties from agents.

Obviously, this doesn't need to be a strict flowchart of events, save for Getting the Call and Cleanup/Vacation. Throughout all of this, players will be rolling their Skills, in order to find out more about the client, the job, and how they can solve the problem at hand. The twist is that who gets to narrate the story changes based on the degree of success. Yup.

Skill Rolls and Augmenting
Inspectres is a collaborative storytelling game, with some light skill roll mechanics. Skill rolls are called for essentially whenever the players are doing an action that would move the plot forward. So in the research and investigation phase, players might be rolling to determine the true source of the client’s misery (beyond “there are strange noises in my attic”). Results are determined by the following chart:


So, let’s take Dipper as an example here. Dipper heard that Lil’ Gideon’s show had something strange about it, so he decided that he’d do as much research on the pint-sized psychic as he could. The GM calls for an Academics roll. Dipper has an Academics skill of 4, so he rolls 4 dice. Sadly his talent (sneezing like a kitten) doesn’t apply here. His dice come up as 1, 3, 4, and 3.

For skill rolls, you only look at the highest die rolled, and discount all of the others. Dipper’s roll is a minor success! Dipper’s player decides that he finds out that Gideon’s amulet is granting his powers, but that in the process of the Investigation, Gideon falls in love (creepy, creepy love) with his sister, Mabel. Play then continues following these new developments in the story. The next time that a skill roll is required, the story will evolve from those results as well (and will probably get even crazier).

A negative roll should not result in the players being irrevocably screwed over, but it does mean that there’s a setback involved. If Dipper’s player was really worried about getting a bad roll, he could take a 4 (a minor success) on the Academics skill roll, because he has 4 dice in that skill. If he were to somehow lose dice in his Academics skill, he would no longer be able to take a 4 on those skill rolls.

If Dipper’s player wanted to go for broke and try to ensure that he got a 5 or 6, he could Augment his roll, either with dice from the Library Card (or another card, for another roll) or with dice from the Bank.

Augmenting involves spending dice from Cards or the Bank. Dice used from cards are always lost after rolling. Bank dice have a chance to be saved (or even multiply!) when you roll them, so they should be rolled separately from the normal dice to avoid confusion. There is significant risk involved in rolling Bank Dice, so it shouldn’t be done lightly. This is because you check each and every Bank Die rolled against the results on the chart, which means you’re far more likely to suffer a bad roll that cancels out any successes if you’re rolling multiple bank dice. It seems needlessly cruel to me, but it isn’t the worst part dice mechanic of the system. That falls to Stress Rolls, which I’ll be covering at the end of this post.

Roll a 6, 6, 6, and 1? Well Jared Sorenson says gently caress You.

Players can also assist each other. This is done by another player or players declaring the assist, rolling their skills as normal, and then passing one die (preferably a high one) to the player performing the major skill roll. They don’t even need to use the same skill, either. Dipper could be translating the spell destroy Gideon’s amulet from his tome (Academics), while Mabel tries to distract Gideon (Contacts), and Soos leads the Gnome Golem away from the group using his truck (Athletics +1d for his talent!). Mabel and Soos' players can pass their best dice over to Dipper, since he's the one making the skill roll to advance the story.

Franchise Dice
You probably noticed that the top two results on the skill roll chart mention Franchise Dice. These dice are how determine how close (or far) you are from completing the mission, and they should help determine the flow of events and narration. At the start of a game, the GM should set a target number of Franchise Dice that the players need to collect from their skill rolls. The suggested amount is twice the number of Franchise Dice that the players start with, so 10 for a completely fresh team. The only caveat to all of this is that you can’t earn Franchise Dice while purchasing equipment with Technology rolls, only through actually using it to solve the case.
Ideally, once the target number of Franchise Dice is achieved, the players should also have solved the client’s problem. You can’t gain more Franchise Dice than the target number, according to the rules, but if the players are really having fun, and there’s still a bit of narration to round things off, I might let them grab a couple more. All that’s left then is Cleanup and R&R!

Cleanup and Vacation Time
This is the best part of course: You get paid. Franchise Dice earned during the mission can be funneled back into the various Cards and the Bank. Unallocated Franchise Dice don’t do anything except give you some padding for the next mission. One of the major uses (and something that I kind of hate) is that Franchise Dice can be used to remove Stress Penalties from Agents, on a one for one basis – aka Vacation Time. What’s Stress, you ask? It’s bullshit. Plain and simple.

Stress Rolls and Cool Dice, or: This is Complete Bullshit

Me, reading this section

We've covered how to make your character, your business, crafted sample characters and even gone through skill rolls and mission completion. Now it’s time to get hosed over by Jared Sorenson.
Stress rolls are what the GM throws at the players to make their lives harder. They represent anything from being cut off in traffic, to coming face-to-face with Viggo, the Scourge of the Carpathians. Players will roll from 1 to 5 dice, depending on the severity of the roll. Some sample situations are listed in the book:



So you can see what kind of action Sorenson considers commonplace for this game. One of the problems with Inspectres as written, is that there is no guidance on how often Stress Rolls should be called for. It’s left entirely up to the GM. I suppose you could call for them whenever players get bad results on their skill rolls, but you’ll see why that’s a bad idea on this next chart. I’ve included the text from the rules, so you know I’m not making this poo poo up.


Prepare to Die Edition

That’s right. You take the Lowest Die and disregard all the others. It’s the complete opposite of a Skill roll, and the consequences are far direr, because the risk on a stress roll becomes exponentially greater as you add to its difficulty. We have 3 different types of rolling mechanics (Skill, Bank, and Stress), and the last one is riskier than the other two combined.

Cool Dice are supposed to be a way to defend against Stress, but in my experience they fall short, since they can be lost as a result of Stress Rolls. For every Cool Die you have (and you start the game with 0), you can ignore one die of each Stress Roll. Cool Dice can also be spent to remove penalties accrued by bad Stress Rolls, or as additional dice on any skill roll. The problem in this system, is that in order to get cool dice, you need to risk Stress Penalties, and once you start getting those, it becomes far harder to achieve the rolls you need to succeed on skill rolls. At the end of a mission, if you do succeed, you’ll need to spend most or all of your Franchise Dice on repairing the damage to your characters, instead of putting them into your Cards or Bank (which you may have emptied trying to make up for the skills you lost due to Stress).

If you hit 0 in a Skill, you can’t use that Skill, unless you have a talent that would grant you a die, or are willing to use dice from Cards or the Bank. Run out of dice, and you probably should have already narrated your character's grisly demise or injury.

The problem, as I see it, is that Jared Sorenson didn't intend for people to play more than single-shot games with the system, and then didn't bother to balance the Stress mechanic against the chances of players rolling 4 or lower on individual dice. The fact that you can lose accrued Cool is just insulting.

-----------------------------------

So that’s essentially Inspectres in a Nutshell. I really love the collaborative storytelling aspect and the premise as a whole, but I feel like the Stress rules as written really drag the game down. I’d recommend playing it, if you’re willing to do a little bit of tweaking to make things work better. There’s a lot more guidance sidebars for GMs, and sources of inspiration within the book itself, which is pretty nice.

There are a few other things that I could cover, including the optional Weird Agents rules (vampires, ghosts, etc), some free supplements (including a Kids Playing Pretend one). I haven’t used any of the supplements, so I’d have to give them a closer look first. There’s even also apparently a movie in production by Reactor 88 Studios, although I think that’s A) outside the purview of the thread, and B)I don’t think it’s even been released yet.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Glazius posted:

So, uh, how do you get back skills lost to Stress? End of the case?

I did cover it in this last post, but it may have been glossed over in my haste to get it done. You spend either accumulated Cool or Franchise dice, the latter only at the end of a mission. This can ensure that you will never be able to recoup your losses from your Cards or Bank, if you've been using them heavily.

Running out on those basically means that your business has gone bankrupt. I think I also forgot to mention that a character can store 3 Cool max, normally. So yeah. You're never safe from stress rolls.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Scrape posted:

I gotta say, InSpectres is a go-to game for my group. Whenever one of our regular players can't make a session, we fall back on that game. It's awesome and plays really well, if you're into no-prep collaborative storygames. You can run a really fun one-shot with literally no more than a vague concept of a haunting or something going on. I highly recommend it for reals, glad to see it getting a little recognition here.

Thanks. It is absolutely meant for impromptu play or as a filler between other games. Did you do any kind of houserule for Stress Rolls? My group found them a bit harsh, as you can imagine from my review.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

quote:

EDIT: Holy poo poo, I just realized the broken down summary is Don't Rest Your Head with some extra normals thrown in.

Has Don't Rest Your Head been done for this thread? It's a neat little book. I think I even have a copy somewhere, so I could throw something together for it.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Tasoth posted:

I was going to post a hack in the homebrew thread that aped Kult and used the rules. I emailed Fred Hicks to see if it was alright if I could do that and he said he would prefer that the rules engine for DRYH not be posted. Modifications to it are cool, but posting how it works is a no go.

Fair enough.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

A friend of mine picked up a copy of Monsters and Other Childish things, and I'm hoping to get to play a session at some point. It looks like a really awesome mix of heavy subject matter with a light tone.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Pththya-lyi posted:

Angels.

You know how whenever an angel appears to people in the Bible, the angel tells the mortal(s) not to be afraid? Angels are scary as gently caress. When I finally get to play this game, I'm going to play an evangelical Christian kid whose monster is literally her guardian angel: flaming sword, shining shield, terrifying gaze, the works.

I think you can do better.

Check out the actual descriptions of different angels within the heierarchies: Burning wheels, multi-headed monstrosities, exploding suns. They're absolutely terrifying in their majesty.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

oriongates posted:

Xena and Hercules went well, so I figure I'll try another game. Herc/Xena was pretty short so let's go the complete opposite...something that'll keep me posting until everyone's tired of me:



It combines massive size, terrible editing, minimal coherency, and a hefty price tag.

Sound interesting to anyone?

By all means! I think I read some excerpts from this a long time ago. Just looking at a physical copy of it was enough to make me roll my eyes.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Looking forward to every time one of the big-name NPCs show up.

Elminster, you had your finger in goddamn every pie.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Robindaybird posted:

So it's badly structured, harder then it should be for the expected character levels, and the gently caress yous aren't even interesting.

The big twist: the dungeon is actually inside the guts of a massive Darkmantle.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

I love the Karrnathi Zombies and Skeletons, because RAW they're smarter, tougher, and generally just better than your bog-standard monster. Of course, they were specifically created that way by the Karrnathi, because the only thing more efficient than fielding an army of unsleeping, unyielding soldiers is fielding an army of those that knows tactics.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

hectorgrey posted:

Hold on, the orcs aren't just rampaging, always chaotic evil barbarians? That's actually rather cool.

Yep. This extends from Eberron's "Let's flip your expectations around" approach.

Just wait until Religion is covered. I'm pretty sure they did away with Alignment restrictions for a lot of things, since the gods are so distant from the mortal plane.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Sounds like MaoCT would be perfect for a Monster Pulse-themed game.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

General Ironicus posted:

Thank you! I planned to finish chapter 3 today but then things happened, so have a preview:


Neural Rewiring (Cybe): You can reshape your brain to recreate the thought patterns of historical experts. That means spending Neural Rewiring points to make spends for investigative abilities you don't have. The cost is the cost of the investigative spend you intend to make, plus one for using the Rewiring in the first place. The Investigative Abilities all belong to one of five past experts, and channeling them also brings an Emotional State your Cybe will exhibit for the next two intervals.

I want to make a Cybe now who constantly channels Poirot, Agatha Christie, Sherlock Holmes, Batman, and Horatio Caine.

Nonstop personality swaps.

Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Hedningen posted:



There are no non-mutated animals, apart from some insects that look the same as they did before the Plague.

I think this is my favorite detail out of the whole background (which is excellent itself).

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Green Intern
Dec 29, 2008

Loon, Crazy and Laughable

Cythereal posted:

Or some grisly Dragon Below trap/machine.

Or some sort of House Cannith disposal pit in an abandoned Creation Forge. Eberron rules!

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