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Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



oriongates posted:

So yeah, not only do you not start out nearly at the power level of the show's characters, but you have very little hope of actually reaching it.

This reminds me a lot of the DC Universe game (West End's D6-System-based supers game, not to be confused with the DC Heroes or DC Adventures RPGs or the DC Universe Online MMO). Forget Superman or Batman, creating a PC who was on the same power level as Robin was nearly impossible.

I don't know if it was just because the D6 System is poor at handing high-powered characters or because someone at West End had a weird idea of what players wanted in their starting characters.

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Selachian
Oct 9, 2012




So I take it a lot of the art in this book is swipes/pastiches from original Golden Age comics?

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



In many ways, TORG feels like a reflection of DC Heroes, probably because Greg Gorden and Ray Winninger were leading designers on both. Both games try to measure everything in game units (APs in DCH, "values" in TORG) and use a logarithmic scale. Both games use exploding dice, although DCH uses acting stat vs. resistance on a chart instead of stat+skill. Both games use a Subplot system. And unfortunately, both have a system of bennies that can be used for either in-game bonuses or character advancement (Hero Points vs. Possibilities).

My experience with TORG, by the way, was that PCs were chronically short of Possibilities; when Dramatic scenes came up, I had to fudge quite a bit to avoid steamrollering them. That may just have been my group, though.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Evil Mastermind posted:

Reversing the device uses Dramatic Skill Resolution, so the PCs need to make skill rolls while being outnumbered two-to-one. Which is hard, but not impossible. Except for one thing.

At no point are the PCs made aware of the fact that they have to reverse the machine or the timeframe they have to do it in. This information is never communicated in-game. They only way they'll know this is if the GM flat-out tells them, "okay, now you have 20 rounds to reverse the flow of the machine or the Earth is doomed."

And the GM better tell them that, because otherwise the players are going to waste a few rounds bouncing attacks off the device, especially if they have explosives. Then they need to realize it's not a matter of stopping the device, it's a matter of reversing it.

Anyway, if the PCs manage to reverse the machine, it destroys itself (a built-in failsafe) and the Earth's rotation will return to normal.


This is exactly what happened to me when I ran this adventure back in the day. Rather than try to alter the device while under attack, the PCs decided to retreat and catch their breath and tackle the device later. I think we ended up throwing away that group of PCs and creating new ones to continue adventuring in a non-stopped world.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012





I used to have a copy of this, but I got rid of it a long time ago. As I recall, you played alien tourists who'd come to Earth to bag a few of the local wildlife (i.e. humans).

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Young Freud posted:

So, is this Bad Taste: The Roleplaying Game, like how the game infers?

More or less. It was a comedy game, not intended to be a gorefest.

Also, the PCs (as far as I can remember) were far from Predator class. You were a bunch of alien middle managers and desk jockeys on vacation, with no understanding of how things worked on Earth -- and no expectation that humans would actually shoot back.

While I never actually played HP, my understanding was that the typical game involved the PCs blundering around trying to figure out Earth technology, zapping a couple of humans, and then getting wiped out in a hail of bullets as the local humans turned on them. Kind of like Paranoia in that a TPK was the expected end state of play, and the fun was in how amusing you could make the inevitable slaughter.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Zerilan posted:

How well would Tomb of Horrors port over to a non-D&D system like DW?

As DAD LOST MY IPOD noted, the Tomb of Horrors is basically an exercise in *not* using the D&D rules. It's definitely the old school D&D mentality where getting through safely is more about figuring out where to look, which buttons to push, how best to butter up the DM, etc. You can't just bull through by having the right spells, class abilities, or magic items. (At least, not until you get to the massive gently caress YOU at the end that's Acererak.) As such, it shouldn't be that hard to port to other systems.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



From what I've heard, that's the reason why AD&D imposed a Charisma-based limit on the number of henchmen you could have: Rob Kuntz was an expert practitioner of the "bring an army of disposable mooks into the dungeon with you" strategy.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



I'm assuming "Doctor Tarr" is a deliberate reference to the Poe story.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Barudak posted:

Edit: Holy mother of god World Tree's cover art is abomnible



I dunno, I find this guy deeply amusing. :mmmsmug:

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012




That's a funny-looking P in the title. When I first glanced at the image, I thought it said Gor.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Robindaybird posted:

Have to second spacing it out.

I admit I take guilty pleasure in works along the lines of Boris Vallejo or Julie Bell, but none of the descriptions are remotely appealing even picturing them in those styles.

But eesh - I was expecting the worst with that oh so classy clitoris in the game's title, it was about as subtle as a brick to the face. I'm not sure how it managed to be worse then the book of erotic fantasy, but it is.

Oh thank goodness, it's not just me. I looked at the cover, saw the stylized female genitalia in the title, and then said, "No, you're imagining things, no one could possibly be cheesy enough to do THAT."

Libertad posted:

Next up we have the Patron Mother, who are basically the senior mentors responsible for training new initiates.

Uh ... "matron," surely? There's already a perfectly good word that means what you want. I can't look at that phrase and not think "father mother."

Unless it's meant to be a Babylon 5 Psi Corps kind of thing. "The Sisters are father. The Sisters are mother. The Sisters are that creepy uncle who wants you to sit on his lap."

Selachian fucked around with this message at 12:13 on Dec 24, 2013

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Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Evil Mastermind posted:

Next, there's The Tri's. And yes, the apostrophe is there; it's because they wear the French tricolor on their jackets as their "gang symbol", as a representation of their defiance of Malraux. Not that they're allied with Paris; a full 95% of their crimes are commited against the Parisean public. It's more the idea of their leader Anne Druillard. She figures that with everything going on, Paris is going to focus on the more serious threats. So she sets her gang up as "Robin Hood" style bandits, working with the PLM to fight other gangs, organizing very public attacks against the Cyberpapacy, and so on. So far it seems to be working in her favor, even though her tactics tend to get a lot of her own people killed. But hey, plenty more where they came from.

I'm gonna go ahead and guess that "Anne Druillard" is a swipe from Anne Parillaud, the star of the original La Femme Nikita, which was out about the time this book was published.

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