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Mr. Vile
Nov 25, 2009

And, where there is treasure, there will be Air Pirates.


My Sarracenias survived the winter and have flowered spectacularly



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Slowpoke!
Feb 12, 2008

ANIME IS FOR ADULTS


Quarantine has made me do things I never thought I would do. Today, I dug up two root suckers from the cherry blossom tree in my front yard. Tomorrow I am going to cut some of the softwood shoots and try propagating the trees from them as well. I even bought root hormones.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






subpar anachronism posted:

I'm not great at outdoor plants so hoping one of you can help me with an ID - my friend working as a landscaper sent this to me asking if I knew what it was and how to get rid of it, because they're struggling to control it. My first guess would have been some sort of lily but due to its invasiveness and resistance to glyphosate I'm leaning more towards like... helleborine. Zone 7b/8a.



Kind of looks like a gloriosa lily? But they are kind of more vines.

Meaty Ore
Dec 17, 2011

My God, it's full of cat pictures!


I need some pest control advice. I planted some peony bulbs a few weeks ago, and one of them has been dug up and absconded with by the local rodentia. I assume it was a rabbit, though we also get chipmunks and squirrels here as well. I can't think of anything else that would do this. At any rate, what works best to keep them away assuming I want to use non-lethal means?

Fortunately they appear to have left the gladiola and begonia bulbs alone thus far.

Meaty Ore fucked around with this message at 05:50 on May 22, 2020

anatomi
Jan 31, 2015


Some kind of fencing is usually the best solution, albeit a boring one.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Good luck keeping rodents out with fences.

Itís possible, but it isnít easy.

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

a cat




Ham Wrangler

Platystemon posted:

Good luck keeping rodents out with fences.

Itís possible, but it isnít easy.

Are you sure he didn't mean fencing instead of fencing? Maybe he's supposed to fight the rodents with swords.

Bloody Cat Farm
Oct 20, 2010

I can smell your pussy, Clarice.


Meaty Ore posted:

I need some pest control advice. I planted some peony bulbs a few weeks ago, and one of them has been dug up and absconded with by the local rodentia. I assume it was a rabbit, though we also get chipmunks and squirrels here as well. I can't think of anything else that would do this. At any rate, what works best to keep them away assuming I want to use non-lethal means?

Fortunately they appear to have left the gladiola and begonia bulbs alone thus far.

Iím trying garlic spray this year. I put some down yesterday around new plantings to see if it will help. This is the one I bought if you want to give it a try. Itís for mosquitos but is almost entirely made of garlic.

anatomi
Jan 31, 2015


Platystemon posted:

Good luck keeping rodents out with fences.

It’s possible, but it isn’t easy.

Well — good luck keeping rodents out at all, you know? Unless you opt for using poison or traps (which are only temporary solutions, depending on the type of rodent). Fencing doesn't necessarily have to be 100% impenetrable (and it never is), just annoying enough to encourage the animal to expend their energy elsewhere.

Build a tiny path to your closest neighbour, complete with rodent-sized signs that say "This way to better grub!"

Serious answer: figure out what's eating your bulbs first. Some farmers here grow sacrificial crops to keep pests away from more precious fields; maybe you can supply feed that this particular culprit would prefer, away from your bulbs.

Oil of Paris
Feb 13, 2004

100% DIRTY



Nap Ghost

Meaty Ore posted:

I need some pest control advice. I planted some peony bulbs a few weeks ago, and one of them has been dug up and absconded with by the local rodentia. I assume it was a rabbit, though we also get chipmunks and squirrels here as well. I can't think of anything else that would do this. At any rate, what works best to keep them away assuming I want to use non-lethal means?

Fortunately they appear to have left the gladiola and begonia bulbs alone thus far.

Goddamn!! bunnies suck and this is the first I've heard of them loving around with peonies. Huge expensive bummer

I like Liquid Fence, which smells like unholy hell but does a pretty good job keeping critters away, even deer for the most part. You can also sprinkle cayenne pepper over the area you want to protect. Both of these only work until the next rain comes or you water, then you have to reapply

Edit: theres of course also the usual advice of planting annuals like marigolds, verbena, and impatiens around where you want to protect. any sort of highly odoriferous herb will do this too (DONT PLANT MINT). coneflower (echinacea) is a good perennial option

Oil of Paris fucked around with this message at 10:40 on May 22, 2020

z0331
Oct 2, 2003

Holtby thy name


LoreOfSerpents posted:

If you're consistently having trouble in that area, have you considered that there might be something wrong with the soil? Assuming that's not a brand new hosta, it looks pretty stunted, which makes me wonder if you've got a disease in the soil.

If you're not sure, you can take a soil sample near the roots and send it off to a lab.

I had considered that maybe the soil wasnít very good, though I hadnít thought about it being diseased. There was nothing but ivy on my side a couple years ago. Not sure if that might do anything.

That said, itís very likely I just didnít take good enough care until they were established. Ny concept of gardening up until now has been dig hole, put plant in, water every so often. The laurels seem to be doing ok and I see new growth. And the other hosta has filled in a bit.



The Rutgers lab is closed for the moment so I think I just gotta wait and see.


Bloody Cat Farm posted:

Iím trying garlic spray this year. I put some down yesterday around new plantings to see if it will help. This is the one I bought if you want to give it a try. Itís for mosquitos but is almost entirely made of garlic.

We started using that last year and...I honestly donít know if it works. It rained a lot mid season which made it difficult to tell. We still got a ton of mosquitos end of July into August. Iím trying again this year in concert with ivy removal, which I hope might take away some of their breeding grounds. We also mostly get those tiger mosquitoes, which can go to hell. Theyíre out at all hours of the day and will just go after you again and again. Iíve read they can breed just in tiny bodies of water, like an overturned bottle cap, so it can be really tough to get rid of breeding areas

z0331 fucked around with this message at 13:32 on May 22, 2020

there wolf
Jan 11, 2015

I got sick of seeing a good poster with TRUMP LOVER so enjoy this thing instead.




It's very unlikely that ivy is providing a giant mosquito breeding ground; it's just as much a home for things that eat mosquitoes as it is is for the pests. The more likely culprit is a neighbor with an old pond or a bunch of junk collecting rainwater.

z0331
Oct 2, 2003

Holtby thy name


there wolf posted:

It's very unlikely that ivy is providing a giant mosquito breeding ground; it's just as much a home for things that eat mosquitoes as it is is for the pests. The more likely culprit is a neighbor with an old pond or a bunch of junk collecting rainwater.

You could have at least let me hold on to the hope for a bit.

Like I said, I read that tiger mosquitoes can breed practically anywhere there's a tiny bit of water. We get lots of them all around the house, so I don't think there's one neighbor or area that is the culprit.

It could be worse, I guess. My parents in Maine have a screened in porch and last summer you could literally see an army of dozens of regular (ie: not tiger) mosquitoes trying to get in and sitting on the outside of the screen.

Bloody Cat Farm
Oct 20, 2010

I can smell your pussy, Clarice.


z0331 posted:

I had considered that maybe the soil wasnít very good, though I hadnít thought about it being diseased. There was nothing but ivy on my side a couple years ago. Not sure if that might do anything.

That said, itís very likely I just didnít take good enough care until they were established. Ny concept of gardening up until now has been dig hole, put plant in, water every so often. The laurels seem to be doing ok and I see new growth. And the other hosta has filled in a bit.



The Rutgers lab is closed for the moment so I think I just gotta wait and see.


We started using that last year and...I honestly donít know if it works. It rained a lot mid season which made it difficult to tell. We still got a ton of mosquitos end of July into August. Iím trying again this year in concert with ivy removal, which I hope might take away some of their breeding grounds. We also mostly get those tiger mosquitoes, which can go to hell. Theyíre out at all hours of the day and will just go after you again and again. Iíve read they can breed just in tiny bodies of water, like an overturned bottle cap, so it can be really tough to get rid of breeding areas

Yeah this is the first year weíre using it, so weíll see if it works for mosquitoes for us. I checked my sunflower seedlings this morning and 2 of them got taken by an animal so doesnít seem to work for plant protection.

subpar anachronism
Jan 15, 2005

I think I'll try drinkin' tonight.


So possibly a dumb question, but even though I've been gardening for years, I've been just kind of derping along with premixed potting soils. I finally gave in and bought some things with which to amend it, like perlite and sphagnum, but I want to repot my monstera and I see recommendations for orchid bark. Is this this same kind of pine/fir bark that's sold as mulch or something different?

Hirayuki
Mar 28, 2010


College Slice

Meaty Ore posted:

I need some pest control advice. I planted some peony bulbs a few weeks ago, and one of them has been dug up and absconded with by the local rodentia. I assume it was a rabbit, though we also get chipmunks and squirrels here as well. I can't think of anything else that would do this. At any rate, what works best to keep them away assuming I want to use non-lethal means?

Fortunately they appear to have left the gladiola and begonia bulbs alone thus far.
A few drops of peppermint oil on a cotton ball kept the squirrels out of all of my containers last season. They need a refresh after a rain, but that's about it on upkeep. You can tuck them under foliage if you don't like the glaring whiteness in your beds. It could work for rabbits, too, but I couldn't speak to that. (We have chickenwire for that.)

anatomi
Jan 31, 2015


subpar anachronism posted:

So possibly a dumb question, but even though I've been gardening for years, I've been just kind of derping along with premixed potting soils. I finally gave in and bought some things with which to amend it, like perlite and sphagnum, but I want to repot my monstera and I see recommendations for orchid bark. Is this this same kind of pine/fir bark that's sold as mulch or something different?
Yup. It's usually bark from Pinus pinaster, at least here in Europe.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Where has this relative of the worldíd largest flower (well, unbranched inflorescence) been all my life?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Lb72WLaLkQ

Easy to care for, edible, ornamental, pretty drat hardy underground and can further be dug up to protect it through any winter. Or simply grow it as a houseplant!

Iíll take a dozen.

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009



https://wimastergardener.org/article/voodoo-lily-amorphophallus-konjac/ posted:

When in bloom it produces an odor like a dead animal, the smell intended to attract the carrion flies that are its natural pollinators. If this is objectionable the flower can be cut off or covered with a plastic bag to confine the smell.

Ornamental might be stretching it..........

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



I thought about that, but Iíve seen the big brother A. titanum in person and the smell on even that magnificent beast was highly overstated.

I need to get more carnivorous plants to capitalise on it.

Hirayuki
Mar 28, 2010


College Slice

Platystemon posted:

Where has this relative of the worldíd largest flower (well, unbranched inflorescence) been all my life?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Lb72WLaLkQ

Easy to care for, edible, ornamental, pretty drat hardy underground and can further be dug up to protect it through any winter. Or simply grow it as a houseplant!

Iíll take a dozen.
I received two happy little tubers from a fellow goon two seasons back. Those two have graduated into fairly ginormous pots, and all their babies have taken up another four pots all by themselves. No flowers on mine yet, but check back a few months back in this thread for more photos from a fellow recipient of this floral good fortune! They're very cool plants, and I can't wait for mine to pop their leaves.

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


I have a quick question about my apple tree I planted last year. I pruned it in winter following various guides and it was looking pretty good, but as its grown this spring one the the bigger branches has started to sag badly. It feels pretty unsupported and weak and has gone from forming part of a quite clear goblet shape to hanging way out.

Excuse the crappy photo, it's the horizontal one on the left.



Any suggestions on what I might do about it?

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



College Slice

Blacknose posted:

I have a quick question about my apple tree I planted last year. I pruned it in winter following various guides and it was looking pretty good, but as its grown this spring one the the bigger branches has started to sag badly. It feels pretty unsupported and weak and has gone from forming part of a quite clear goblet shape to hanging way out.

Excuse the crappy photo, it's the horizontal one on the left.



Any suggestions on what I might do about it?

Nothing wrong with propping it up until it grows stronger.

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


That seems so obvious that I feel faintly stupid for not having done it already.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



College Slice

Blacknose posted:

That seems so obvious that I feel faintly stupid for not having done it already.

I only thought of it because my dad did it for a peach tree growing up, donít feel dumb.

If thereís one thing Iím learning and relearning over and over again is just how crazily adaptive plants are. Give them a nudge here and there and theyíll do amazing things!

Blacknose
Jul 28, 2006

Meet frustration face to face
A point of view creates more waves
So lose some sleep and say you tried


As I'm sure you can gather from the photo I'm generally more of a 'let the weeds grow and call them wildflowers' kind of gardener so actually having to take proper care of a plant is fairly new to me. I think before this my most complex care needs have been lavender and rosemary. Good to know that nothing is going horribly wrong with the tree.

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009



I have a tall, thing eucalyptus tree out the front of my unit which looks like it's starting to keel over into the shared driveway of the strata. It's been storming for two days so I haven't gone out and checked exactly what's up with it yet.

Assuming it survives the storm (which it's looking like it might now) what sort of professional do I even get to come look at it? I know nothing about tree care and assume I won't be able to do anything for it myself, but it feels irresponsible just leaving it as is when it might fall across the driveway sometime.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



The professional you want is an arborist. They can assess the health of the tree and recommend action to stabilise it or remove it. If it needs to be removed, the professionals who do that are in the ďtree serviceĒ business.

I donít know what Australian law is on the subject, but common law is that property owners are only responsible for their trees if there is an issue they were made aware of. If the tree was rotten in its core and no one knew about it, its fall is an act of god. If the tree was rotten and an arborist informed the owner, now the owner is on the hook if they fail to take action and the tree causes damage.

Whatever the legal situation is, getting an arborist to take a look is the right thing to do.

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009



Cheers, I'll see if I can get one. That sounds about right for my rusty torts knowledge but a moot point in this case since I don't think it will actually do any damage if it falls. I'd rather just pre-empt the problem if I can and either fix or remove it.

Nosre
Apr 16, 2002






These are a few years old at this point and they're finally really showing off





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Bloody Cat Farm
Oct 20, 2010

I can smell your pussy, Clarice.


Absolutely beautiful

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