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EagerSleeper
Feb 3, 2010

by R. Guyovich


Giant Boy Detective posted:

Well, our windows are southwest-facing (northern hemisphere), so we get really strong direct sunlight around them around 1pm-6pm at the moment. Would putting the graptopetalums in that light sunburn them, or can they stand the harsh afternoon light? I think I'll take your advice and try to start new plants with the tops or leaves, and put those in the teacups, while re-potting the current etoliated ones into something bigger.

Please forgive me for the confusion. When I said that Graptopetalums need almost direct sun, I meant to say that they almost ALWAYS need direct sunlight to avoid etoliation. They are hard to sunburn. Somewhere that remains bright for most of the day should do great. However since your plants were living indoors up to now, you should slowly acclimate them to the intense light difference. Hopefully wherever you live has an covered place by your doorway that you keep your plants there until they can handle direct sun. After three days, you can move them out.

Good luck with your plans!

Giant Boy Detective posted:

There aren't actually any drainage holes in the teacups. The volunteer working the arboretum store that day said they had put charcoal at the bottom of the cups to make sure the soil wasn't sitting in water, and told us to check that the soil an inch or two down was dry before each watering. And that we'd eventually have to re-pot them when they got too big anyway. She explained that they couldn't just drill holes into these teacups because the drill would crack the ceramic, so I've no idea how anyone else has managed to do so. Sorry about that.

No, it's no problem. In fact I think it's even cooler how they managed to avoid the problem woth having no drainage holes. I've always wanted to grow a moss terrium back when they were trendy, but the guides online were never that helpful about having good drainage.

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Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


EagerSleeper posted:

I've been meaning to ask someone this for a while, but how did you drill a drainage hole into coffee cup? That seems like a badass thing to do.
Masonry/Ceramic drill bit and a regular old drill

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



gender illusionist posted:

All this talk of etiolated plants reminds me of what happened to one of my favorites while it was kept in a dark spot for a few months:



yes, that's a flower stalk on there (that's a big deal in the UK!)

Inflorescence

I will take pictures of my succulents when I get back to my apartment in a few weeks, but I have some plants here at my parents' that I will post in the morning.

dinozaur
Aug 26, 2003
STUPID
DICK


This was one of my favorite succulents from many years ago until it was destroyed in a move. Anyone have a clue what it may be?


And to give this post a little content, here are a few of my plants which are looking nice right now. Unfortunately my Echeveria Gibbiflora "Carunculata" toppled under the high pressure stream of a hose while trying to rinse it for a photo op. Hopefully the little guy can come back.

Thriving in the sunny window are Cotyledon tomentosa, Randoma Succulentis, and a sad Haworthia which has been dwarfed by its gargantuan roommates.


Up close and personal with Hosta "Patriot" and Ajuga Reptans in a photo taken last year during sunset.


My snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) which has happily grown to 4'x4' in my living room while living in hard Virginia clay receiving water whenever I remember.


And lastly a Tulip exhibiting some interesting phototropism after trying to reach the evening sun on the other side of my Arizona Cypress(Cuppressus arizonica "Blue Ice")


Its far too sunny out in the yard to take any more pictures, but maybe I'll update with some more as things come along.

dinozaur fucked around with this message at 18:38 on May 5, 2013

LuckyCat
Jul 26, 2007



Grimey Drawer

Yay plants!

I have a few around the apartment I'm pretty proud of.

First is my terrarium. It's the first one I've done, and this was a couple weeks after and it was thriving. Now its not doing quite as well, but nothing is dead yet! The spike moss on the left is slowly browning and getting smaller/seemingly evaporating. (The little plant with the fake ladybug on it). The yellow flower plant in the middle is pretty sick too these days, but the fittonia and tall green plant in the back are doing great.


This little money tree I've had for almost a year and it's pretty much zero maintenance. I water it about once a week and it's never given me any trouble, brown or yellow leaves, etc. And yes, that is the tag still on it because I like to read it every now and then.


My cat's personal favorite: the bamboo palm.


On the right is a Medusa fern. I'm really hoping I do well with it because its beautiful (if fairly standard for a fern). I worry about the pot I bought for it being too small. On the left is a "grow lavender from a kit." It's not working out too well. The seed packet only gave me 3 sprouts, and they're already dying. That's fine, I like the little bamboo pot, so I'll clean it out and plant something else in there.


And the newest addition to the family is a tillandsia. An air plant! He moves around depending on my mood, and sometimes the cat is caught batting him around. Quite a hardy plant.

LuckyCat fucked around with this message at 07:57 on May 6, 2013

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



My desert rose


I was told this is a "jade plant"

unprofessional
Apr 26, 2007
All business.

dinozaur posted:

This was one of my favorite succulents from many years ago until it was destroyed in a move. Anyone have a clue what it may be?

Looks like a Euphorbia of some type. Extremely large genus, though, so hard to know them all.

Hummingbirds, your jade is a jade (Crassula ovata). Nice adenium.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Hooray a general plant thread!

Warning, massive image dump coming. Here is a survey of more or less all the plants at my house. Just to preface this: my wife loves plants, but she also kind of has a black thumb. That is, she is a plant murderer.

I have been more or less indifferent to the plants, in that unlike my wife I regularly water everything that's outside, but I take no special care, do not perform much in the way of plant maintenance, and pretty much treat the watering of all outdoor plants the same (during the warm dry months I water as often as daily when I remember, to as infrequently as over a week without watering when I forget or am busy; during the wet months I occasionally remember to water the patio plants and otherwise don't water anything at all).

Imgur has a 50-image limit per hour for their API so here's the first fifty photos. I just kind of took 2 minutes to buzz through and around the house taking rapid photos so some of these are a little blurry. If you see anything interesting you want a better photo of just ask, I'll be happy to oblige. Also there's a couple plants here I'd love it if anyone can identify!

OK let's start indoors.

Here is a little terrarium my wife set up in one of the windows in the living room. It has orchids in it.





These apothecary jars have mossy things in them. There's also a sad orchid sitting there.




Here's a row of jars in the other LR window. Some of them have live plants and some have dead plants. All of them are dusty.




My wife got this one from someone at a frog meeting. It likes to be moist and is some kind of special rare tropical plant maybe from florida? I forget the details.



I'm told these are actually alive, although they appear to be dead.


This is an australian orchid of some kind.


This jar has a probably-dead orchid and some mossy stuff.


Happy moss.


OK, now we're going outside.

Here is a ficus I bought for my chameleon. He died last month so now it's sitting outside. I do not care if it dies, it's just a cheap houseplant, but I am still watering it.


Aloe my wife's mom gave us last month. I think I am watering them too much (almost daily) or perhaps they want more sun or less sun or acid or alkali or food or who the gently caress knows. Plants are mysterious.


A geranium which is happy and a lavender that is not. The lavender almost died due to not watering it much over the winter (it's under the eaves so it does not get rained on) but I think I have revived it this spring.


Some tall flower plant thingies that grow back all the time on the right. I don't know what they're called. On the left is millet. I did not mean to grow millet, but the bird seed feeder (just out of shot) drops seeds on the ground and some millet grew. I'm OK with that, it grew some actual millet seeds and I just added them to the bird feeder. Free birdseed!


Nopales cactus, also known as prickly pear. You can eat the young cactus leaves if you like mexican cooking. I've been meaning to try it. It also makes a fruit that turns a deep red. The fruits are packed with seeds and covered in invisible super-tiny horrible spines that you can't pull out of your flesh and are very painful. I touched one once and never again. Someday I will eat a fruit, I just need to learn how.



MYSTERY BUSH. Someone please identify this! Generally everything in this little plot out front just grew there. The previous owners removed a bunch of plants but roots have grown and stuff maybe seeded. These were not here when we moved in, but a year ago they started growing. They have a strong fragrance that is weird but not really unpleasant. I think they might be California natives. They flowered in the early spring and are still flowering a bit. Any help identifying them would be nice.




These roses sprouted from the roots that the previous owners left in the ground when they took their roses with them.



A little tree. It grows leaves and flowers each year but does not seem to get much bigger. What kind of tree is it? so please tell me if you know.


A dwarf Improved Meyer Lemon tree we planted last fall. Meyer lemons are awesome. Also in the back right is a shrubby plant thing that makes white flowers that last for a day or two and then it makes seed pods. My wife knows what this plant is called but I forget.


My sycamore tree. I think it's a sycamore. It is a sick sycamore because it gets mold on its leaves but it still grows and stuff. Probably I need an arborist to come give it medicine and probably it also ought to be pruned? I do not know about trees.


Some kind of ornamental sage on the other side of the garage. It is super happy and loves being neglected.



OK this is our back covered porch. It is my wife's Darwinian succulent cage-match of death. She loves succulents and buys them and brings them home and puts them here and then some of them survive on me hosing them down periodically with water, and some do not. None of these are in direct sun but the patio roof is translucent so they get filtered sunlight. Few have been re-potted from the original containers. There is also a little pond thing which looks awful but is actually doing great.


A survivor succulent. This one just flowered. The one behind it is also happy. In the foreground is a succulent that did not make it.


These are stone plants I think? or something. I think they look cool.


More living succulents.



Some have shot up giant long flower-stalks this spring. These ones seem best-adapted to the deathmatch patio arena environment.



This is a cactus. That's all I know.


Another cool succulent with a visitor. Every once in a while my wife propogates a couple of these succulents by breaking off chunks and putting them in other pots. I assume the two pot-mates will eventually fight to the death.


This is my own pot of succulents. I actually potted this, with sand and then soil on top so it'd drain well, at least 6 or 7 years ago. (The mushrooms are just ceramic decorations.) Despite the dead stick parts all of these guys have lived for a long time and basically do OK.


This thing actually likes the shade and the amount of water I give it. I think I got it from my mom. It is a good plant.


My wife made these ceramic things as an experiment to see if plants will live in it. This one has been here for months and isn't dead yet so maybe the experiment is a success!


There are some weeds in the plants. I pull them out sometimes if I am feeling like weeding.


This was a bonsai that lived indoors. It survived my wife's treatment for a couple or three years but then it died. Now its corpse serves as a warning to other plants.


A bromeliad. I use broms in my frog environments. I got this one from someone and broke off a bunch of the bloomy plant brom thingies and put them in tanks a few years back. It survived and has grown back. It is not looking great right now because I let it dry out in the late winter for too long but I've been watering it freely now and I think it's going to recover.


The horrorpond. There are floating plant things that went dormant for the winter but they are all still fine and will sprout back out any day now. The green stuff is frogbit, it's supposed to be there. And the succulent is one my wife brought home that had broken off of someone's plant somewhere. She just stuck it right into the pond and left it there. It's been there for over a year and isn't dead so I guess some succulents are OK with being stuck in a pond. Who knew!


Clover is weird. All the above ground parts can be dead but you water it and more grows. These are genetically hosed with to be 4-leaf clovers.


My little pot of succulents again.


I'll post the remaining 35 images after the imgur 1-hour API limit is passed.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Dubble-prousting to put the rest of these images up.


Alright here's more photos of my little pot of succulents. It is a jungle in there.





My father-in-law gave me this. It's still alive after a year or two but hasn't grown much. Probably it wants to be in a bigger pot or in the dirt. I think it's a tree.


This cactus is mine. It loves where it is sitting and has doubled in tallness over the last couple years. I water it regularly and it makes tons of bright red little flowers around its circumference. You can see some at the top that are going to bloom very soon.



At our old house there was this tree/bush thing that made red berries every year. I had this pot near it and whatever was in the pot died. One day a thing sprouted and I soon realized one of the berries must have germinated. So now it is growing here (3 years later).


Now we've moved out into the weed jungle back yard. Here we see the herb garden on the left.


Lavender. It likes being in the dirt.


Rosemary. This stuff is unkillable and if you don't control it it will turn into a giant hedge and take over everything.


From left to right, we have mint, oregano, and thyme. The thyme seems to die back during the winter but then grow out again.


A native plant! We planted this sticky monkey a couple years ago. It is a local native that is well-adapted to our local climate.



A redwood tree. We had our wedding outdoors, and as wedding handout things we gave everyone little pots my wife made, each with a redwood tree sapling. Most people's saplings are long-dead by now, but this one we planted when we moved here. It is doing pretty well with plenty of water. It's actually in the partial shade of the large redwood tree our neighbors have against this fence.


Some ornamental thyme ground cover we randomly put here a couple years ago. For a while a neighborhood cat was using this as a catbox. Some of the thyme is still alive, though. I don't know why my wife decided this was a good place for it.


Wild strawberry, growing in the leaf litter from the bamboo which my other neighbor grows against the fence. A few stalks have emerged on my side of the fence too, which is OK with me. This stuff blooms and bears tiny fruits regularly. We planted it less than a year ago and it's spreading nicely.


A random plant we also just stuck in the ground. It survived the winter being covered over by leaves from a tree.


Here is our patch of artichokes. We planted these two years ago. They start growing in the fall, bear flowers (you eat) in the spring, and then die off completely. I didn't realize they'd regrow when we first planted them. In the middle, a plum tree is growing. It's growing there because that's a spot I water - we have plum tree roots running all the way across the yard, from the house to under the fence to a spot where our neighbor had a plum tree that they cut down last year.



Here's the plum against the house. My wife says we need to take this one out since it's up against the foundation. I agree if it's going to get any bigger than this, but it doesn't seem to have grown that much in the last 3 years.


Here is our compost bin, which is currently situated next to the artichokes & plum.


Behind the compost bins, a huge mass of vines with lovely purple flowers has grown. The neighbor on the other side of the fence had (or maybe just used to have) these things in the ground. We replaced the fence a year ago and this stuff grew here anyway.



A weed. This is the rear end in a top hat of weeds because it's covered with horrible prickles. I can't pull this weed because the spines go right through my gloves. I just chop it down with a hoe and then it grows back. Someone tell me what the name of this horrible deathplant is, please.


These trees grow along this section of fence. They're for privacy I guess. What kind of trees are they? Someday we will probably take them out and put in native trees instead.


Here we are at the back of the house. This narrow walkway dead-ends in the fence that the big nopales is growing against, so we rarely go back here. This plant is growing here, it makes nice pink flowers but it's getting out of control and I think it is probably not native. Once again, please tell me what this plant is.





I planted a thornless blackberry back here 2 years ago. It got killed this fall when we had a big tree removed and the tree removers trampled it, but it has re-sprouted from the ground. Now I have given it a thing to climb which will hopefully make it easier to walk around it. This section gets a lot of sun and heat for a couple hours at midday, but tends to be in shadow the rest of the day. Hardy blackberry should be able to hack it.


OK back near the patio a little section I forgot. These cala lillies grow every year. I guess there must be bulbs down there. They are now dying off.


Another patch of mint we planted. This area is shaded most of the day but the mint is OK with that.


This thing keeps growing here. I think it's a kind of tree we've seen in our neighborhood. I do not want a tree here so I chop it off or yank it out and then another one grows in its place.


This was going to be this cool raised bed thing. You dig a trench in a rectangle and screw wood together and then put sticks along the wood and cut all the sticks off at the right height. Unfortunately it turns out doing the stick-placing thing is incredibly tedious so I will never finish this. Instead I think we will build some raised beds out of recycled lumber from the urban ore place over in Oakland.


And that about covers it. Thank you for looking at all my plants!

Leperflesh fucked around with this message at 01:25 on May 7, 2013

unprofessional
Apr 26, 2007
All business.

Few notes:

Your Australia orchid appears to be a Dendrobium; you should mount it on a tree on your property.

Your tillandsia do indeed appear to be dead.

You can plant all your succulents in your zone; they'll be happier than the conditions you have them in now. For future reference, don't leave stuff in the pots you buy them in, use a potting soil that's cut with at least 50% inorganics, and don't water every day.

Looks at how big redwoods get. Does it make any sense to have it that close to a fence? It's not tall enough for you to prune it up above the fence, and won't be for years, so it's gonna be ugly. Keep giving it lots of water, but put it somewhere with some space.

Your "tall flower plant thingies" are cannas - take the aeonium out of your pond and put the cannas in it in a pot with the top of the soil level with the top of the water - they're semi-aquatic and will look even nicer in it.

Bark on that tree indicates sycamore, but can't say for certain without seeing the leaves; they'll look very similar to maple leaves. Canopy is definitely sparse, but it doesn't look bad.

Your floating plants look to be water hyacinth; a nice ornamental, but very invasive in California, so don't let any get thrown into an in-ground pond.

Blackberry is extremely vigorous - cut back the shoots after every growing season, or it'll take over.

Prickly weed is thistle. Destroy as it will spread rampantly.


You actually have a lot of nice plants, but your place looks like a dump because it's all overgrown and not maintained. One of the best things you could possibly do is some raised beds in full sun with a substrate that'll drain easily and then put all over your succulents in it. Put the little ones in front and the big ones in back and you'll honestly have a great looking garden. Your aloe hybrids will spread, your aeonium will get big and lovely, and your mesembs will divide and be more interesting.

Elston Gunn
Apr 15, 2005



I made a little box of succulents for my window at work. I might take the rocks out so they can spread some more.

Fozzy The Bear
Sep 27, 2009


I recently planted 5 rose bushes in the eastern facing side of my house. I have deeply watered them once per week and I dug the holes twice as wide as the containers as the tags said, but they look like they aren't doing well.

Top leaves are dry and falling off:


Base leaves are turning yellow.


More water? Should I buy some liquid fertilizer? Maybe they aren't getting enough sun?

I had planted two roses in a more sunny side of my house a few years ago, and after a few years of not watering them, they are now 3 feet tall and doing well. So I am not sure what to do.

Even the healthiest of the bushes is starting to turn yellow.

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



Yellow leaves usually indicate overwatering, actually.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



Oh so that's probably why my herbs outside have yellow bottom leaves. It's been raining like every day all day so they're probably getting too much water in their pot. I guess I'll keep it under the overhang if it rains again. Do plants usually bounce back alright from that? It's putting out new leaves and it's even got a flower I think.

unprofessional
Apr 26, 2007
All business.

Succulent box looks good. Leave the rocks and the plants will grow in and around them - in a year you'll just have glimpses of them.


Yellowing leaves can be a lot of things, but in general, it's a sign of stress. Think of it as a balance: if a plant has enough energy, it puts that energy into getting bigger/flowering, if it doesn't have enough energy, it balances itself by dropping leaves. Don't fertilize a stressed plant. When did you plant these? It could be as simple as transplant shock. How many hours of sun is it getting? Generally east-facing is fine, as long as nothing blocks the morning sun. You might be overwatering if there's not a ton of sun on that side, but it seems unlikely at one watering a week, unless you've been having rain.

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



I went to the nursery today! I love the nursery.


My very own tillandsia


I love this because it looks like a tiny opuntia (it's about three inches tall)


Fenestraria ("Fenestra" is Latin for "window" )


Lithops to replace the one I had for a year that my roommate overwatered and killed


Rosemary and lavender

Hummingbirds fucked around with this message at 20:32 on May 8, 2013

the fart question
Mar 21, 2007



College Slice

Hummingbirds posted:


Fenestraria ("Fenestra" is Latin for "window" )


That's because that translucent bits at the top is a window down to the photosynthesizing stuff in the leaf . It keeps it down there for protection from the harsh elements, or something like that.

Luminous
May 19, 2004

Girls
Games
Gains


There was a thread last spring about lawns and lawn care, but I think the archives ate it. But, since lawns are plants, here we go:

I'd like to seed my lawn with a grass and (green) clover (micro clover seems to be all the buzz) mix. I was wondering if anybody had experience with this that could give me guidance on what proportion of mix they used, if they had a particular brand they liked, and what an appropriate cost per pound is.

I've seen a premixed version, as well, of 5% micro clover and 95% grass available through home depot (MasterGreen brand), but I don't know if that is a good ratio to ensure the micro clover actually will survive and contribute.

Guidance to the clueless much appreciated.

Sagebrush
Feb 26, 2012





Gravy Boat 2k

I went to water my fly trap today and found that one of the traps has sealed up with a little black thing inside it. I think it's a fruit fly. Way to go, little guy, I'm buying you a grow-lamp

Fozzy The Bear
Sep 27, 2009


Hummingbirds posted:

Yellow leaves usually indicate overwatering, actually.

Greatly appreciate this advice! I was about to water my roses again because of the yellow leaves. I didn't, and now most of the leaves are coming back to green.

Costello Jello
Oct 24, 2003

It had to start somewhere

Very cool plants you guys have. I fell in love with succulents after seeing the great succulent room at the NY Botanical Garden. I really don't know much about them though, but I'd love to be able to find some of the more unusual varieties.

unprofessional posted:

I am also into rare conifers and grafting.

Well, that's a sentence I've never heard before, and may never hear again. But I think it's awesome that you're doing it. What do you use as rootstock, is there a gold standard species for conifer grafting?

unprofessional posted:

Check out those possible witches brooms and get pictures! They're out there more than people realize, and you could name your own cultivar!

I thought witches brooms formed because of hormonal response to stress damage from pathogens. So can they really be considered "cultivars" if the DNA of the plant is unchanged from wildtype? Or are they considered cultivars because the pathogen is still present in the grafting and therefore continuing the effects, and thus you can continue the lineage only through grafting?

Costello Jello
Oct 24, 2003

It had to start somewhere

I love seeing everybody's pictures (I wish my snake plant looked half that good) and hope people keep posting more, so here's two of my succulent terrariums.



Holden Rodeo
Apr 2, 2008


Leperflesh posted:

Here we are at the back of the house. This narrow walkway dead-ends in the fence that the big nopales is growing against, so we rarely go back here. This plant is growing here, it makes nice pink flowers but it's getting out of control and I think it is probably not native. Once again, please tell me what this plant is.





That's an oleander. It's poisonous, but it's not like you're going to turn it into salad.

Costello Jello
Oct 24, 2003

It had to start somewhere

I love oleander, it's one of the plants I really miss from the Deep South, along with live oaks and magnolias. (Real magnolias, not those boring little dwarf magnolias that can grow anywhere).

unprofessional
Apr 26, 2007
All business.

Costello Jello posted:

Well, that's a sentence I've never heard before, and may never hear again. But I think it's awesome that you're doing it. What do you use as rootstock, is there a gold standard species for conifer grafting?


I thought witches brooms formed because of hormonal response to stress damage from pathogens. So can they really be considered "cultivars" if the DNA of the plant is unchanged from wildtype? Or are they considered cultivars because the pathogen is still present in the grafting and therefore continuing the effects, and thus you can continue the lineage only through grafting?

Nearly every spruce can be grafted onto Picea abies, five-needle pines onto Pinus strobus, two-needle pines onto Pinus sylvestris, firs onto whichever rootstock is easiest to find in your location, arbovitaes and false-cypresses onto Thuga occidentalis anywhere with clay, and Thuga plicata anywhere else. There are exceptions to every rule though - eg. Pinus contorta var. latifolia 'Chief Joseph,' is generally only grafted onto Pinus contorta var. latifolia understock, making it a very expensive tree to graft, and it doesn't readily take to grafting, making it even rarer. Sure is a gorgeous tree, though.

I don't know enough to answer your second question definitively, but here's what a person more knowledable than myself said when asked if brooms were genetically the same as the parent plants, "chromosomes have shifted and the mutation is now not like the parent but rather an offspring." I have never seen a broom revert to normal growth (unlike sports on trees, which is a different deal altogether), so I suspect that's a pretty accurate assessment of it.

Here is a variegated sport I found on a local Thuga occidentalis 'Smaragd.' I was told it happens on about 1/100 of this cultivar, and always reverts back, so not worth propagating.



Here's another Picea abies broom I found recently. This is the most interesting of the brooms I've found, as it looks like it might cone heavily at a small size.

unprofessional fucked around with this message at 17:33 on May 23, 2013

Not an Anthem
Apr 27, 2003

I'm a fucking pain machine and if you even touch my fucking car I WILL FUCKING DESTROY YOU.


Giant Boy Detective posted:

Well, our windows are southwest-facing (northern hemisphere), so we get really strong direct sunlight around them around 1pm-6pm at the moment. Would putting the graptopetalums in that light sunburn them, or can they stand the harsh afternoon light? I think I'll take your advice and try to start new plants with the tops or leaves, and put those in the teacups, while re-potting the current etoliated ones into something bigger.


There aren't actually any drainage holes in the teacups. The volunteer working the arboretum store that day said they had put charcoal at the bottom of the cups to make sure the soil wasn't sitting in water, and told us to check that the soil an inch or two down was dry before each watering. And that we'd eventually have to re-pot them when they got too big anyway. She explained that they couldn't just drill holes into these teacups because the drill would crack the ceramic, so I've no idea how anyone else has managed to do so. Sorry about that.

Flip the cup upside down, have a continuous stream of water flooding the "hole," mark the hole with a nail or scratchy object, then SLOWLY drill into the hole. Widen the hole with a file or something. I do this all the time.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Holden Rodeo posted:

That's an oleander. It's poisonous, but it's not like you're going to turn it into salad.

Oh, awesome thanks!

I still haven't figured out the weird Mystery Bushes out front. I spent about two hours using online plant identification sites but I got lost among all the scientific details about plants and I also find that these websites are incredibly incomplete - most seem to list maybe two or three hundred plant species.

Marchegiana
Jan 31, 2006

. . . Bitch.

It's hard to tell with the pictures you have, but your mystery bushes look like they may be some variety of broom. Are they making seed pods that look vaguely like peas?

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Marchegiana posted:

It's hard to tell with the pictures you have, but your mystery bushes look like they may be some variety of broom. Are they making seed pods that look vaguely like peas?

Yes! The little pods are pea-sized, but are split into (usually) four points on the top, so they look kind of... crowned? A few are five-pointed.

The flowers seem to have all been four-petaled, with four long stamens between the petals. The brush is very "fragrant", the smell sometimes is offputting but sometimes I enjoy it, so I'm kind of thrown. It's not really like anything I've smelled before so I can't describe it in a useful way.

It could be a native plant (northern California), or it could be something that previous owners had planted here - we've had a lot of stuff that they had planted, but we had no idea was in the ground, just randomly sprout and grow after a year or two of just a patch of earth in that particular spot.

e. here's some closeups I just took:



e2. On doing some reading, I now realize you were asking if it makes pea-pod like pods. Nope! I got excited reading about brooms on wikipedia, but I don't think this is a broom because it makes these individual seed things, and the flowers (while yellow) don't seem quite right.

Leperflesh fucked around with this message at 18:31 on May 23, 2013

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002



That reminds me of a beautiful variegated Yew I found once. It didn't keep its variegation either.

EagerSleeper
Feb 3, 2010

by R. Guyovich


Luminous posted:

There was a thread last spring about lawns and lawn care, but I think the archives ate it. But, since lawns are plants, here we go:

I'd like to seed my lawn with a grass and (green) clover (micro clover seems to be all the buzz) mix. I was wondering if anybody had experience with this that could give me guidance on what proportion of mix they used, if they had a particular brand they liked, and what an appropriate cost per pound is.

I've seen a premixed version, as well, of 5% micro clover and 95% grass available through home depot (MasterGreen brand), but I don't know if that is a good ratio to ensure the micro clover actually will survive and contribute.

Guidance to the clueless much appreciated.

I remember that thread you're talking about, I looking for it too but the archives definitely ate it.

I have never reseeded my lawn but I feel bad if your post goes ignored, so here goes! I did a little research on the internet and I only found two lukewarm responses to micro clover, which means that besides the 100% positive promotional information from the dealers not a lot of people have much to say about adding clover to the lawn.

I didn't even know that clover was desirable to have in the lawn, but I have a bunch of it. I suppose if you're pretty good at fertilizing your lawn, then you may want to make the percentage of micro clover higher than 5% since it would have a harder time taking off than the grass seed, but if you don't have micro clover at all in your yard to start with than 95% grass/clover mix seems like a good way to introduce it.

A concern to keep in mind is that clover and grass compete with each other. The roots of a clover naturally repel other plants around it, and only the clover itself benefits from the nitrogen fixation. Hope this info helps somehow with your decision! On the positive side, micro clover is really cute.

Please keep in mind that I'm talking out of my rear end here.

edit: Here's the website I found about other alternatives for an alternative lawn. Not only is there more resources about adding clover to your lawn, but there are also options to grow buffalo grass instead. Let your whole lawn look like a painting by Vincent van Gogh!

EagerSleeper fucked around with this message at 20:52 on May 23, 2013

Tremors
Aug 16, 2006

What happened to the legendary Chris Redfield, huh? What happened to you?!


Five of my Mimosa pudica seedlings ended up being healthy. They seem to be doing well.


Today is a good day, because my Synsepalum dulcificum (aka miracle fruit plant) arrived!


The stalk is about 5.5" tall since it is ~9-10 months old. It looks pretty healthy to my untrained eye and I hope I can keep it that way until it bears fruit. What size pot should I plant it in?

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Tremors posted:

What size pot should I plant it in?

Generally, at least one size bigger than it will currently fit and shaped for that plant's root growth. If you leave out dirt the plant won't use (at least until it grows bigger), you'll also make the potted plant lighter to move around. But if you have a perfect pot and don't mind lugging all that extra dirt around, go ahead and put it in its mature size pot.

Some plants like succulents just don't make deep roots so they do better in shallower pots. Some other plants like African violets don't like soggy bottoms, so some growers will put something free draining in the bottoms of their pots like perlite or gravel so that the soil will sit above the water line in its saucer and won't wick it up.

EagerSleeper
Feb 3, 2010

by R. Guyovich


There was a long post here, but Opera keeps crashing while trying to load all of the images.

Dinozaur, I think your mystery succulent is an Euphorbia esculenta. The shape it has is called a medusa. Also that is a really nice looking Ajuga reptans picture!

Leperflesh, your confused tour through your wife's Darwinian succulent death-match made me laugh. Also the clover that you have is really an Oxalis plant. They are similar to clovers, but they can be identified by their larger leaf size and by the way their leaves droop down, as opposed to a clover's erect leaves. However there are some clovers that are more likely to have four leaves naturally.

Tremors, nice plant! I always wanted to grow a miracle fruit for myself. Since it has a very small root system, I would hold off on putting it into a full size container. I would suggest finding a smaller, but still upgraded size container (maybe a 1 gallon container) to put it in while it's root structure gets more developed.

EagerSleeper fucked around with this message at 17:05 on May 25, 2013

Fog Tripper
Mar 3, 2008

by Smythe


Drove out to the middle of nowhere a couple thousand feet higher than our place. Dug out a few wild sagebrush seedlings to replace the one that died in the middle of our lawn. It was doing really well until we put the grass and the irrigation in, and in the fall it flowered like crazy, dropped seeds and abruptly croaked. I think we drowned it.

Will be planting the seedlings in parts of the yard that stay parched most of the time.

unprofessional
Apr 26, 2007
All business.

Mystery bush ID: Ruta graveolens

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Hummingbirds posted:

Lithops to replace the one I had for a year that my roommate overwatered and killed


I've had some of these for a decade now. An ex-girlfriend of mine affectionately called them my "butt plants".

They're also a great plant to show off to people not familiar with succulents. People can't resist touching them.

Costello Jello
Oct 24, 2003

It had to start somewhere

dinozaur posted:

This was one of my favorite succulents from many years ago until it was destroyed in a move. Anyone have a clue what it may be?


I would also love to know what this is called, if anyone knows. That's a cool, creepy little plant.

EagerSleeper
Feb 3, 2010

by R. Guyovich


Costello Jello posted:

I would also love to know what this is called, if anyone knows. That's a cool, creepy little plant.

Just a couple of posts upwards, but I think it's an Euphorbia esculenta. For sure it's in the Euphorbia genus since Euphorbias are weird. Sometimes they look like a leafless, geometric, succulent cactus. Sometimes they're a woody shrub. And sometimes they're a stygian hellbeast. This is one of those times.

Either that or it's an Euphorbia flanagii.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1157/

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Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

unprofessional posted:

Mystery bush ID: Ruta graveolens

Holy poo poo, that is totally what it is. Thanks dude!

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