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Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

We live in a wonderful and varied world full of many fantastic cuisines and culinary traditions. No matter what corner of the planet you find yourself on, youíll probably find something tasty which is beloved by millions of locals and anyone whoís come into contact with it. For some, itís the food of France and the Iberian peninsula, for others itís Japan or China or Senegal or wherever. For myself, though, and for many others, there is the food of a place which is not so foreign or far away, not so alien, but instead tastes above all things like the food of oneís innermost desires and longings. It tastes like what my parents made when I was young, like what we ate at church potlucks, like what to me isnít exotic at all but is, just, food.

Mexican food.





So this is the Mexican food thread. I will preface the rest of what I have to say with a few things: I am not a Mexican Ė Iím a Californian now living in Nevada. My Spanish is at times strained and I have an accent which makes my Mexican friends laugh pretty good. There are many parts of Mexico which I have never been to. I am by no means an authority on this food. I do however love it from the bottom of my stomach, and hope to do it justice as well as answer any questions you may have.

Letís start by looking at Mexico:

Look at all of those states! For the most part, each one has itís very own distinctive styles of cooking and ingredients that combine to a very unique set of local dishes. So like when we talk about French food, when we talk about Mexican food weíll refer a lot to regionality. When I post recipes Iíll mostly be posting about Baja, the Pacific coast down to Michoacan, Durango, and Zacatecas, since those are the areas and cuisines I know.

Now, about ingredients. There are going to be a few things which will be your staples pretty much no matter what regional cuisine youíre going to be cooking. These staples are:
Masa (Nixtamalized corn meal, or essentially ground up hominy). This is the primary staple in pretty much the entire country, used for tortillas, tamales, in champurrado and other drinks, etc.
Beans This is the main protein for the majority of Mexicoís population historically, and even though the country is increasing in wealth, it doesnít always trickle down, and beans are still A Big Deal. I prefer Peruanos myself, which are a small yellow bean. Different regions variously use pintos or black beans or frijoles rojos or these little black and white beans that I totally forget the name of right now. In the case of beans, just be sure to use good dried beans and not to bother with canned, as there is a significant price and quality difference.
Onions White onions generally, but yellow will do in a pinch (they are sweeter, though). Used almost every where.
Garlic Used less often than onion, but still indispensable.
Chiles (dried) Literally hundreds of varieties exists. All have different flavours nuances, so itís better just to list whatís needed by recipe. If youíre worried about buying a whole bunch just for one recipe, donít Ė they last forever and cost nothing.
Chiles (fresh) Very different from dried! Used very differently as well. I mostly use poblano, jalapeno, Serrano, Anaheim, and chiltepin.
Cumin, Coriander (seed), allspice, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc. A well stocked spice cabinet with good whole spices is going to be needed for a lot of this cooking. Cumin and coriander are the ones I use the most, but youíll find yourself using all sorts of other things.
Cilantro, oregano, epazote, hoja santa, marjoram, thyme, etc. A host of herbs will be wanted as well, always fresh (well, you can get by with dried thyme and oregano, but itís not the same. Please donít use dried cilantro ever for anything.)
Limes Seriously the most used acid for almost anything. Sometimes youíll use vinegar, but thatís like 1 out of 50 times that youíll use limes. Also a condiment, an ingredient in drinks, etc. etc.
With these basic things, as well as access to a wide selection of fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, and good quality meat products, youíll be able to put together almost every meal. Iíll do separate entries and update the OP later for specific ingredients (like cactus leaves, etc.) with recipes as the mood strikes me.

So anyway, much like the Chinese food thread, I hope and expect that this thread will grow with many recipe additions, general questions, and anything else relating to the subject at hand. I know this is a very incomplete OP for now, but keep checking back on it and it will flesh out. Iíll also keep it updated with a list of recipes at the bottom, so check there. If anyone sees those recipes show up, feel free to add them to the wiki because that would be cool as well.

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Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Recipe list (Check back often!)

Flour tortillas (vegan!, easily convertable)

Tortillas de masa. General instruction, good advice.

Mr. Wiggles fucked around with this message at May 23, 2013 around 19:29

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

°Yay! Mexican food owns. And because I live 20 minutes away from the border, it's not exactly hard to get whatever ingredients I need, for cheap.

Let's start off with flour tortillas, which go with everything. I'm vegan, so the fat I use is shortening (or sometimes canola oil) but feel free to go with lard or a 50/50 mix of lard + shortening, or add some butter, or whatever:

Flour Tortillas
3/4 lbs flour
5 tbsp fat
3/4 tsp salt
~3/4 cup warm water
(Optional: scant 1/2 tsp baking powder)

Mix the flour and fat until the fat's all mixed in. The mixture should be sort of crumbly.

Add the salt and some of the water in and combine. You want enough water to make everything damp but not very wet or anything. Knead until smooth - you don't need to knead as much as bread, but it should be sort of stretchy (Rick Bayless says it should be 'firm' which might be more helpful but whatever). Robert Rodriguez has an example if you need to see it in action.

Split into 12 balls and let rest for 15-30 minutes or more if you have the time. Cover them with something so they don't dry out. Plastic wrap or a damp cloth works.

On a floured surface roll them out to a ~7 inch circle: flatten the dough a bit, roll it out, turn it 1/3rd of a turn, roll again, keep on going, etc. Put onto a heated cast iron pan (or something else heavy) on medium to medium high heat. Bubbles should form. Give it 30-45 seconds (you want it to be browning) then flip it over and give it another 30-45 seconds (it will probably puff up).




Beats the poo poo out of the cardboard tortillas they sell at the grocery store.

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

General question about corn tortillas as I've been working on making my own recently. I seem to always have trouble getting them to not stick while I'm rolling them, so they end up ripping. I add flour, they're too floury, I use less, they stick, so I have trouble finding a middle ground. I'm using a french style rolling pin and parchment paper, have also tried with wax paper. I can post the recipe I use, but pretty sure its standard using masa flour (Maseca), hot water (but not too hot), and salt. They're always amazing regardless of their ugliness/difficulty, just gets annoying when you're on your tenth one and it gets all torn up coming off the paper.

I never thought they would be so much better than store bought so I don't mind playing with the dough, but any tips or tricks to make the rolling process easier?

Stoked on this thread as my cooking goal for the past 6 months or so was to start cooking more Mexican food all the time! Mmm chicken adobo. Mmm adobo anything. Anyone willing to share their basic red salsa recipe? I know some of those are closely guarded family secrets.

The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




I live in Texas, and more specifically in an area that has a very large Mexican and Hispanic concentration. As such, there are many Mexican restaurants around. Even though I myself am mexican in heritage, I was born and raised here, and I often wonder: how accurate is it to call the food I'm eating "Mexican food?"
Sure, it tastes good, but is it authentic? I am almost ashamed to say I don't know. Whats the opinion on Tex-Mex, and other hybrids, vs authentic Mexican food, and does the real deal nerit any more cost or value, and any more searching for? Or is it simply good enough that the food taste good?

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


My godmother is from Michoacan, so I consider this to be the food of my people. She makes an amazing mole rojo that takes all day Ė she soaks/blends the chili negro, chars her tortillas to get the smoky flavor in, the whole nine yards. I've been thinking about asking her how she does it, and maybe this thread will finally get me to do so. I still have a few bags in the fridge though, so we'll see. I'll try and get her sopa de fideo recipe too.

Btw if anyone lives in dried chili hell we can work out an arrangement where I can ship you amazing California chilis on the cheap. I've done it for Dane and Happy Hat, I can do it for you.

Veet Voojagig
Oct 15, 2012


Iron Lung posted:

General question about corn tortillas as I've been working on making my own recently. I seem to always have trouble getting them to not stick while I'm rolling them, so they end up ripping. I add flour, they're too floury, I use less, they stick, so I have trouble finding a middle ground. I'm using a french style rolling pin and parchment paper, have also tried with wax paper. I can post the recipe I use, but pretty sure its standard using masa flour (Maseca), hot water (but not too hot), and salt. They're always amazing regardless of their ugliness/difficulty, just gets annoying when you're on your tenth one and it gets all torn up coming off the paper.

I never thought they would be so much better than store bought so I don't mind playing with the dough, but any tips or tricks to make the rolling process easier?

Try working directly on the clean kitchen counter instead of using parchment paper, just sprinkle some flour on the work area and have at it. Also, try switching to a flat rolling pin.

I am unsure of the science behind it but I'm pretty sure making perfect hand-made tortillas requires some internal ancient voodoo that only selected people have. My grandma and aunt used to make tortillas from the same ingredients, at the same time, using the same exact technique with completely different results, it was mind boggling. They always said it was the kneading that made all the difference.

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Veet Voojagig posted:

Try working directly on the clean kitchen counter instead of using parchment paper, just sprinkle some flour on the work area and have at it. Also, try switching to a flat rolling pin.

I am unsure of the science behind it but I'm pretty sure making perfect hand-made tortillas requires some internal ancient voodoo that only selected people have. My grandma and aunt used to make tortillas from the same ingredients, at the same time, using the same exact technique with completely different results, it was mind boggling. They always said it was the kneading that made all the difference.

Yeah most of the recipes I've read on it say to just use two plastic shopping bags and a press so I figured parchment paper and a rolling pin would work, the corn dough is fairly sticky though. I'll try flouring the rolling pin and the counter and see if that helps! I need to try my hand at flour when I can eat gluten again, I tried to make some with "alternative" flour and they were... bizarre. I miss my roommate's mom's tortillas, all she uses is flour, water, and oil and they are so incredible. I hate when he brings them home.

Maybe we could add a section to the OP/2nd post about where good Mexican food in our respective areas is? Might help out The Bananana and others with questions on where the good stuff is, although there's nothing wrong with Tex-Mex in my book! Like it says in the OP, the food varies from state to state in Mexico and even the US, so I think as long as your reference point for good Mexican food isn't Taco Bell/Chili's, chances are if it tastes good, it is good. I'll be bummed when I leave AZ, growing up in a place where amazing Mexican food is everywhere has spoiled me forever.

Plan Z
May 6, 2012



I'll be watching this thread really closely. I've started working on my friend's food truck (the only one in a crowded campus town) where we make Mexican (with influences from Central and South America) food from scratch. He's learned by studying it, and spending off-time working in kitchens around Mexico City. I'm trying to catch up with him, and have run into some cool books on it. We're open only in the summer and our menu over the first two weeks has consisted of things like black bean and goat cheese tamales, camarones al coco, and tacos nopales, and we change the menu daily/weekly. His food is delicious, and apparently authentic enough that visitors from Mexico, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Guatemala, and the south border states rave about how great and authentic it is.

If I could give advice, try to use as much corn flour for tortillas as possible. We try to grind corn for our own, but if we can't get a hold of it, a bag of Maseca is the best alternative. I found maseca in my little hick town's chain supermarket, so unless you're really out in the boonies, it shouldn't be terribly hard to track down. With that stuff, and only some water, you can make easy, tasty, almost authentic tortillas that taste much better and are easier to make than white flour tortillas.

Plan Z fucked around with this message at May 23, 2013 around 06:18

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by R. Guyovich


I want to hear more about the use of nuts, less common (in the US) herbs, and also hydrated dried chilies in purees and sauces. These have been the most fascinating things I've encountered in mexican cooking over the last couple years. I'd talk like I knew something, but I really don't know much.

Tacos Al Pastor
Jun 20, 2003


My grandmother use to use ash in her tamales (ash tamal). I poo poo you not, these were the best tamales I have ever had.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


Can we talk good/bad about Rick Bayless in this thread?

The Bananana posted:

I live in Texas, and more specifically in an area that has a very large Mexican and Hispanic concentration. As such, there are many Mexican restaurants around. Even though I myself am mexican in heritage, I was born and raised here, and I often wonder: how accurate is it to call the food I'm eating "Mexican food?"
Sure, it tastes good, but is it authentic? I am almost ashamed to say I don't know. Whats the opinion on Tex-Mex, and other hybrids, vs authentic Mexican food, and does the real deal nerit any more cost or value, and any more searching for? Or is it simply good enough that the food taste good?
I live in the midwest and I'm from a family of Mexican immigrants, they were fieldworkers for a generation, and then factory workers.

Everyone was poor and lived in a shed on the farmers land, so it was beans, rice and tortillas every day. Chicken and beef and cheese were a luxury. If you could find some tomato or lettuce it was used. That means if you were to serve these people 'Mexican food' like ceviche or tortas they would want to know what the gently caress you were doing.

These are the greatest corn tortillas you will ever buy. They don't rip up when you put them in grease. They're delicious for tacos, tostadas, or enchilidas.

Also, learn to make your own flour tortillas (like the recipe above) or find a local bakery that makes them. Anything you find in a store with a national brand is dogshit.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Bob Morales posted:

Can we talk good/bad about Rick Bayless in this thread?

Absolutely

henkman
Oct 8, 2008


What's wrong with Rick Bayless?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



henkman posted:

What's wrong with Rick Bayless?

The interactions between him and his daughter are really creepy

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


If anyone has a recipe for loose Mexican chorizo, especially one that isn't super oily, that would be great! It seems like they are always greasy when I get them from the grocers.

Tacos Al Pastor
Jun 20, 2003


Bob Morales posted:

These are the greatest corn tortillas you will ever buy. They don't rip up when you put them in grease. They're delicious for tacos, tostadas, or enchilidas.

Where I live there are at least 15 tortillerias in my city alone. I think the key is to go early and buy fresh and dont refrigerate them (this is key) like a lot of gringos do. They should almost have the consistency of dough. Good quality maize tortillas are amazing.

YEAH DOG posted:

If anyone has a recipe for loose Mexican chorizo, especially one that isn't super oily, that would be great! It seems like they are always greasy when I get them from the grocers.


Like you use in Chorizo con Huevo?

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


spiralbrain posted:

Like you use in Chorizo con Huevo?

Yep, a coworker from a past job made that every so often for the office, and I want to share with the new job!

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


YEAH DOG posted:

If anyone has a recipe for loose Mexican chorizo, especially one that isn't super oily, that would be great! It seems like they are always greasy when I get them from the grocers.

The not-greasy chorizo is the worst stuff!

I use it for the standard Mexican breakfast of eggs+chorizo+refried beans and tortillas. You can also mix it in your beans for tostadas or use it to stuff peppers.

The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




GrAviTy84 posted:

The interactions between him and his daughter are really creepy

Wow, thats crazy, I just caught an episode of his a week or two ago where he made a green chorizo, and, not knowing anything else about him, remember thinking, "thats one creepy looking dude." Food looked good, though, so...

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Yes, at long last.

Last month I finally found a place that sold queso oxatan and I went into a quesadilla frenzy. I made some pickled jalapeŮos and just use them, the cheese, and a super light smear of this amazing dark red salsa the same store sells.

My "record" is 12 in one day but I was pretty drunk during most of it. The weak point is the store bought corn tortillas but as soon as this month is up I am going to try and make my own.

Anamaxis
Nov 20, 2012




Started reading this thread and became determined to make my own corn tortillas, after a few failed attempts I was able to make some pretty consistent rounds that didn't stick. The issue I found was that the tortillas had a slightly grainy appearance on the outside (purely aesthetic, still pliable). Im trying to resolve it but im not sure what to adjust. So a few questions:
1) Would it be better to use a steel pan? I did this batch in a cast iron pan?
2) Is there a difference between tamale mix (labelled as nixtamalized corn) and Masa?
3) Is fat a necessity? I was following a recipe that recommended only water and Masa.

Thanks for any insight guys, I foresee future soft tacos!

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


I lived in Mexico for several years and am married to a Mexican (like really born and raised in Mexico, not East LA). I'm willing and ready to answer any questions and offer any suggestions. I grew up in Cajun country (and make some amazing Cajun food), but Mexican food is by far my passion.

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



Anamaxis posted:



Started reading this thread and became determined to make my own corn tortillas, after a few failed attempts I was able to make some pretty consistent rounds that didn't stick. The issue I found was that the tortillas had a slightly grainy appearance on the outside (purely aesthetic, still pliable). Im trying to resolve it but im not sure what to adjust. So a few questions:
1) Would it be better to use a steel pan? I did this batch in a cast iron pan?
2) Is there a difference between tamale mix (labelled as nixtamalized corn) and Masa?
3) Is fat a necessity? I was following a recipe that recommended only water and Masa.

Thanks for any insight guys, I foresee future soft tacos!

Well, I check to see if your 'tamale mix' has anything besides corn in it, but even then it shouldn't make too much of a difference - Masa used for tortillas is nixtamaliszed as well. I never use fat when I make tortillas (but I'm not an expert on the subject) and they come out fine as far as I can tell. I actually make them on an electric griddle, since it provides a big surface area and even heat. You might just need to knead a little longer, and you also might be making them too thick (at least that's how it looks in the picture).

CARL MARK FORCE IV
Sep 2, 2007

I took a walk. And threw up in an English garden.

The nixtamalized corn in masa para tamales is ground coarser than your garden-variety masa harina, if I remember right. That might be your problem.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


bolo yeung posted:

I lived in Mexico for several years and am married to a Mexican (like really born and raised in Mexico, not East LA). I'm willing and ready to answer any questions and offer any suggestions. I grew up in Cajun country (and make some amazing Cajun food), but Mexican food is by far my passion.

I want all of your Mexican and Cajun recipes ahhhhhh

Looking forward to this thread and trying some authetnic recipes rather than my white boy version of tacos and stuff!

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Cast iron is also good since its such even heat and should be fairly non-stick. I'll use a lovely nonstick pan if I'm in a hurry, and they always work fine. My guess is your dough is coarser like mentioned previously, and you shouldn't need fat. I usually do masa harina, salt, and hot water.

M42
Nov 11, 2012




gently caress yes, I love mexican food. I moved from the northeast to the bay area last june and the Mission blew my goddamn mind. I started making my own tortillas, tacos, etc. They're nowhere near as good as the stuff you can get in the city, but they're probably a wee bit healthier. Here's tacos from the last time I made them.




I've been wondering, how the hell do mexican places get the burrito tortillas so amazingly thin and pliable? Is the trick just a shitload of oil and one of those tortilla presses? If I knew how to do that, I would eat nothing but burritos for lunch until the day I die.

Plan Z
May 6, 2012



One of the keys for corn tortilla flour is to let it rest, covered for at least 20-30 minutes after mixing it very well. Trying to stuff it into a shell and cooking it right away before the maseca can properly absorb the moisture will result in some crappo tacos shells. For me, it's easy to just do maseca, and about 3/4 of the recommended water, waiting for a while, then adding water until achieving a somewhat dry mixture that softens when you knead it. If you plan on making tortillas a lot, buying one of those great Mexican tortilla-makers (they resemble those old laundry mangles) cuts so much fuss and mess out of the process. They're affordable if you can find them in person, but ordering them can be expensive if you don't know where to look.

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Plan Z posted:

One of the keys for corn tortilla flour is to let it rest, covered for at least 20-30 minutes after mixing it very well. Trying to stuff it into a shell and cooking it right away before the maseca can properly absorb the moisture will result in some crappo tacos shells. For me, it's easy to just do maseca, and about 3/4 of the recommended water, waiting for a while, then adding water until achieving a somewhat dry mixture that softens when you knead it. If you plan on making tortillas a lot, buying one of those great Mexican tortilla-makers (they resemble those old laundry mangles) cuts so much fuss and mess out of the process. They're affordable if you can find them in person, but ordering them can be expensive if you don't know where to look.

Thats good to know about resting, I usually don't leave them for that long but will try that for sure. I've had my eye on a press: http://goo.gl/MBYKt for a while. Is it worth the money or should I go with a cheaper aluminum one like this: http://goo.gl/UKIQX ?

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

I use that exact cast iron one.

Hawkeye
Jun 2, 2003


YEAH DOG posted:

If anyone has a recipe for loose Mexican chorizo, especially one that isn't super oily, that would be great! It seems like they are always greasy when I get them from the grocers.

This recipe is not tested for authenticity, but is one I've worked with when moving to places where I couldn't get chorizo. The recipe below makes a good amount. I freeze it in 1/4lb sticks (shape into logs by wrapping in plastic wrap & then foil wrap). They last a good while in the freezer, and a 1/4 stick is good for a lot of dishes. I got the recipe by googling for chorizo recipes and searching around for a while to get one that 'seemed' authentic.

It has always come out if anything not fatty enough for me. The last time I made it I actually found and bought a pound of 'pork fat', and added in about 1/2-3/4 lb. I like it better that way. Last time I made a batch, I got out 13 or 14 1/4-lb links, to give you an idea of what kind of scale to expect.


Chorizo
3 1/2 lb Pork Shoulder, self ground (this is ~1/2 of a shoulder, i usually get a full shoulder, ask them to cut it in half, and use half for pulled pork)
5 dried ancho chiles
3 dried pasilla chiles (I have also just used 8 ancho chiles when the store was out of pasilla)
2 chipotles (dried, not in adobo)
1 tsp coriander, ground
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tbsp ground cumin
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp hungarian hot paprika
2 tbsp paprika (regular sweet)
6 cloves garlic, minced
3/4 cup vinegar



1) Remove stems & seeds from chiles, toast in an ungreased pan over medium heat.
2) Once toasted all over, transfer chiles to a plate and leave them to cool
3) Break chiles up into a blender, and blend into a fine powder
4) Add in the rest of the ingredients except for the ground pork, blend those into a paste. Thin with more vinegar if needed to get it going
5) Add chile puree to the ground meat, work it together so it is well mixed in.
6) Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for 2 days, mixing the sausage mixture at least 2 times a day.
7) Freeze or use as needed.

Hawkeye fucked around with this message at May 24, 2013 around 22:47

Anamaxis
Nov 20, 2012


Doing a direct comparison, it is very obvious that my flour was coarser, will have to attempt these again soon!

Tacos Al Pastor
Jun 20, 2003


Plan Z posted:

One of the keys for corn tortilla flour is to let it rest, covered for at least 20-30 minutes after mixing it very well. Trying to stuff it into a shell and cooking it right away before the maseca can properly absorb the moisture will result in some crappo tacos shells. For me, it's easy to just do maseca, and about 3/4 of the recommended water, waiting for a while, then adding water until achieving a somewhat dry mixture that softens when you knead it. If you plan on making tortillas a lot, buying one of those great Mexican tortilla-makers (they resemble those old laundry mangles) cuts so much fuss and mess out of the process. They're affordable if you can find them in person, but ordering them can be expensive if you don't know where to look.

I mix a little of that water with lime juice.

marshalljim
Mar 6, 2013


M42 posted:

I've been wondering, how the hell do mexican places get the burrito tortillas so amazingly thin and pliable? Is the trick just a shitload of oil and one of those tortilla presses? If I knew how to do that, I would eat nothing but burritos for lunch until the day I die.

I assume the dough has to be very well-kneaded in order to stretch so thin without tearing.

Beyond that, I think it's mostly practice and skill at hand-stretching them. There are a lot of good videos on Youtube of people making that style of tortilla if you search for things like "Sonoran tortilla" or "tortilla sobaquera".

Those big Sonoran-style tortillas traditionally have a fair amount of fat in them, too (normally lard) which might also help

Edit: Actually, Googling is telling me that fat should weaken the dough. Still here's a couple of recipes that look like about what I've been told by Sonoran people; they're using 15-20% as much lard (manteca) as flour by weight.

marshalljim fucked around with this message at May 25, 2013 around 05:32

Oakland Martini
Feb 14, 2008
Refugee from the great account hijacking of 2008

My family and I visited Guanajuato for a week to take a Spanish class a few years ago. My dad and I love cooking Mexican food, so one of our teachers' grandmothers offered to give us a lesson on cooking mole Poblano. I thought I would offer the recipe here since this seems like the best thread for it. It is a bit time-consuming but pretty easy overall, and tastes absolutely amazing.

Somebody's abuela posted:

Ingredients:
  • 3 each of the following dried chiles: guajillo, ancho, mulato, pasilla (seeded and destemmed)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup almonds, 1/3 cup pecans, 1/3 cup filberts, 1/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/2 medium white onion (roughly chopped), 4-6 cloves garlic
  • 2-3 1-inch pieces of canela (Mexican cinnamon), 10 cloves, 10 allspice, 10 black peppercorns, all ground together in mortar
  • 3/4 to 1 disc Abuelita chocolate, broken into eights
  • 4-5 cups chicken stock (hot, preferably freshly-made)
Instructions:
  • Fry chiles in small batches for about one minute, put in large pot.
  • Fry onion and garlic for one minute, add to pot.
  • Fry nuts for one minute, add to pot.
  • Fry raisins for one minute, add to pot.
  • Fry spices for one minute, add to pot.
  • Dump contents of pot in blender, add chicken stock until 2/3 - 3/4 full and blend, then strain contents of blender back into pot.
  • Put everything that didn't make it through the strainer back into blender with 1-2 cups hot water, blend and strain. Repeat twice more.
  • After the third time blending, add blender contents straight to pot.
  • Simmer, stirring constantly, for 15 minutes.
  • Add chocolate slowly, one piece at a time, and keep stirring. Taste after each piece of chocolate to decide when to stop. This should take another 15 minutes or so.
  • Simmer 15 more minutes, still stirring.
  • Traditionally served over rice and chicken, but you can use it for pretty much anything that sounds good. I've even served it for dessert on top of chocolate cake.

We also had a fantastic garlic soup in a restaurant there, and after some experimentation I think we've got the recipe down:

quote:

Ingredients:
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 16 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 5 cups chicken stock
  • 1 can diced, fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • Queso fresco
  • Croutons
Instructions:
  • Cook garlic in heavy pot on medium-low until soft and golden brown. Do not fry, just barely simmer; you don't want to come close to burning it or you will have to start over.
  • Strain oil out of garlic, return garlic to pot, add stock, simmer for 30 minutes partially covered.
  • While simmering, prepare soup bowls with crumbled cheese and croutons.
  • Blend 1 cup soup with tomatoes until smooth, return to pot.
  • Bring to boil, add salt to taste. Turn off heat, add eggs. Serve.

Oakland Martini fucked around with this message at May 25, 2013 around 15:22

Oakland Martini
Feb 14, 2008
Refugee from the great account hijacking of 2008

On a different note, while I have all the Bayless cook books, I recently got Truly Mexican by Roberto Santibanez, and it is really fantastic. It focuses on almost entirely on sauces, so it has plenty of room to explore regional variations on broad themes (adobos, moles, salsas, etc.) At $25 for the hardcover version, it is a steal. I highly recommend it.

Oakland Martini fucked around with this message at May 25, 2013 around 15:37

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


gently caress yeah, glad to see this thread! Mexican food is one of the world's greatest cuisines. I found a great source for goat meat in my city so I am set to make birria tomorrow. Will post photos.

TMMadman
Sep 9, 2003

He will be injured, but in the World Series he will be raised from the DL. And the Indians were filled with grief.



Does Mexican street food count for this thread? Because I absolutely love elotes.

Boiled fresh corn served with butter, mayo, cayenne pepper/chili powder, cheese (cojita I believe) and I prefer to add a little lime. It's absolutely delicious and I love living in Chicago cause the food carts are all over the place. However, since I am always driving when I get it, I just get it served in a cup:

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FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Boiled? In a cup? What is this sorcery?

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