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shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Hadlock posted:

So to clarify product differentiations:

i7 mobile - all quad core except one, all have HD5xxx graphics, all have turbo boost

Huh? A lot have HD4600 graphics.

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shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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It's just hilarious how the Engadget review is saying the Vaio Pro is better than the Vaio Z in every way.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/06/04/sony-vaio-pro-11-review/

engadget retard posted:

But there's an ergonomic benefit too: the wedge shape makes the keyboard a little more comfortable to type on.

Wat.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sports posted:

I'd have to recommend against Sony Vaio: their laptops are priced similarly to Apple product, but quality wise are far behind Apple standard.

What are you talking about? Their prices are much lower than Apple's. Quality-wise they are ahead or behind in different respects.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sports posted:

They have laptops that attempt to compete with Apple, with base prices around ~$50 below Apple. Most people should know that an Apple refurb is 15% off.

The Vaio S outcompetes the non-retina MBPs pretty well at much lower prices. And the 13" Vaio S kind of competes with the 13" MBA (at a lower price), too. I have no idea how you come up with opinions like this but you should probably try considering reality.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Shofixti posted:

Have there ever been durability issues with the hinges on convertible laptops? Do the hinges vary significantly from brand to brand? Some of them look really flimsy; even the solid looking ones still strike me as a disaster waiting to happen. If there were serious issues I'm sure they wouldn't be selling them, but I just can't shake the fear of the hinge breaking somehow.

They've been around for a long time, so you should only run into trouble if you choose one made by a company that makes insane and capricious design choices, like Sony, which, upon deciding to make a convertible tablet, decided to design a completely brand new hinge mechanism with externally exposed springs.

Edit: In other news, the Lenovo Y410p comes with a 1600x900 screen option.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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pointsofdata posted:

Other than that would strongly recommend the T4**s line to anyone. Would be almost perfect if the bezel was a bit smaller.

It might be smaller next generation. If the T431s and X230s are anything to base this opinion by. They both have less bezel.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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BrokenLinux posted:

What does everyone think of Lenovos new y510p. I'm looking to get rid of my desktop cause I'm losing my office to a nursery. I do casual gaming (rift/wow/D3/lol). Seems pretty well priced and includes the new haswell tech.

I would probably want the sli model but it looks like the card it comes with is a 720m? Maybe that's a typo?

Definitely a typo.

Note that there are still reports of bad trackpads, and also reports of weird screen colors, on recently shipped Y500 models. Also note that the Y410p now has a 1600x900 option, which makes it pretty worthwhile.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Acer just doesn't want people to notice how bad their trackpads are.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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fookolt posted:

What companies other than Apple have really nailed the touchpad?

Panasonic's tiny circular touchpads are better.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Cream_Filling posted:

I doubt even the current Lenovo-designed ones will last as long, and now it looks like they're going to change the design to be another bad knock-off of Apple design by copying the most questionable parts of the design - sunken hinges, no physical latch, clickpads, and possibly even soldered ram/battery/drives.

Latches are just another thing that can break, and they only keep the laptop from flying open _after_ the main impact has been absorbed. They're only really useful if the hinge itself can't hold the laptop closed. The space and budget needed for latch holes and a tube going across the laptop's interior would be better spent on an actual improvement to the machine's structural integrity.

Sunken hinges are good because they keep the screen closer to the keyboard and retarded people that can't touch type and would suffocate without a backlit keyboard thus have less distance to move their eyes.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Cream_Filling posted:

The cheap crap approach of having an extremely stiff hinge is even worse both in terms of usability and durability.

An extremely stiff hinge? No. You don't have a stiff hinge, you have a hinge that snaps closed (via a spring or some other kind of spring-like mechanism, I don't know) when it's nearly closed. This is what the business-rugged Toughbooks do.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sports posted:

Panasonic Toughbooks are way too overpriced and honestly not very smart buys when Apple product surpasses their quality while being 60% of their cost. Please stop mentioning Panasonic Toughbook product lines when mentioning competitors to Apple, these laptops are rarely found in the US and aren't exactly machines of ownership.

And here I thought I was giving examples when talking about latches and build quality. Please stop mentioning your opinions.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sigma 6 posted:

Battery Life: rated battery life for Retina Macbook Pro - 7 hours; rated battery life for W530 using same Watt-hour battery - 12.8 hours. Advantage: Lenovo

Lies lies lies. The Lenovo will last that long if you dim the screen to 10 nits, disable bluetooth, turn off the GPU, have a dual core CPU installed, and turn down the wifi card to all the way to "wireless charging" mode in which it gives energy back to the machine from ambient wifi signals.


sigma 6: you don't have to get a thinkpad. Those "cheap pieces of plastic" will work just fine if you're not a goonlord with how you handle the machine. And ASUS, Sony, and Toshiba generally have better failure rates than Lenovo. If you got some ASUS or Toshiba machine you wouldn't be making a mistake. (If you got a Sony you would be.)

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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unpronounceable posted:

For a Thinkpad, they all say "starting at x.xx lbs". What exactly could you configure to add weight to it, other than a larger battery?

It's mostly the larger battery. You could also configure an ultrabay battery on some models. That affects the weight. You could configure a hard drive in the ultrabay instead of optical. With other stuff (mSATA, RAM, etc) you're just adding the weight of the chips, which is negligible. Some old W-series had a configurable touchscreen, which would affect things.

A backlit keyboard might increase weight too...

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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WHERE MY HAT IS AT posted:

Someone in the last thread mentioned that a sales rep told them they'd be announcing refreshes on the 13th

I'd also like to note that the prices on Ivy Bridge models seem to be lilting downward even harder than before. The T430s is now <$800 on the main site, before it would be just under $800 on the B&N Gold portal. So the 13th, or "soon", seems to be quite realistic.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Hadlock posted:

Is it possible for you to post a fact in this thread, or at least a link to at least support your statement?

A link to what? How would a link be useful?

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Doctor rear end in a top hat posted:

That's what a lot of people say that haven't used them (me included). Then you read reviews from AnandTech and people say they find themselves reaching for the screen to do simple stuff like scrolling more often than the touchpad. The thought of a fingerprint-covered screen doesn't really appeal to me, though.

Scrolling with a touchscreen on Windows 8 isn't pretty. Two finger trackpad scrolling (or even hitting the spacebar) is far better, because with Windows 8 (at least with IE) you have to drag the page at the speed your finger moves. There's no acceleration. If IE had a Kindle-style tap-the-right-side-of-the-screen-for-page-down, it would be a lot better. (Incidentally, phones also would be vastly improved. When I made a Hacker News iPhone reader app, adding big long invisible buttons on the left and right sides for pagedown/pageup made for a much better experience than the browser's drag-based scrolling.)

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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The T431s's battery is replaceable, you just need a screwdriver: http://support.lenovo.com/en_US/detail.page?DocID=PD026726

Also, being less sturdy (if it even is so) makes sense when the product doesn't cost $1800 (in 2004 dollars) anymore.

shrughes fucked around with this message at 22:13 on Jun 11, 2013

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Also worth considering is that the Air natively runs at 1440x900. The rMBP runs at doubled 1280x800. You can scale it to retina-esque 1440x900 or (I presume) 1680x1050, and it'll look pretty good. But you might feel like a bad person, since really it's scaling down 2880x1800 or 3360x2100 down to 2560x1600. My general feeling is that if you want a machine for doing work on, the 13" rMBP would be better. But then really maybe you just want the 15" rMBP, if screen pixelage is so important to you. (And why would that be? Because you don't have a real place to work, with monitors to plug in to. I think a 13" laptop is something where you would be using its built-in screen infrequently enough, unless you're a college student or on-the-go salesguy, that it's not worth the cost of the IPS retina screen (paid in weight, battery life, and dollars). However, your situation might be such that it is. These factors depend upon what your life is like.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Bleh Maestro posted:

They cost more money than a windows laptop. I also want a full size laptop instead of an air, and a full size macbook are even more expensive

Get an Alienware 18. It's full size.

Another good full-size choice would be the Lenovo Thinkpad W701ds, but it's getting a little bit old.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Maybe you want a Lenovo Y410p. The 1600x900 model is $850.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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The Y410p's panel is glossy, not matte. Also it allegedly has solid blacks.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Also if you're a fan of the discrete GPU always being on. And a fan of the fan of the discrete GPU always being on (can I make that pun?).

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Oxxidation posted:

Would the lack of driver support be worth the potentially reduced cost? And if so, any decent mid-priced machines people can recommend? I'm not looking for a laptop that can outdo my 360 performance-wise or anything, just something that'll be moderately future-proofed for lower-end games for the next few years or so. Also screen size - my Latitude had a 15.4" and I'm used to stuff in that range, if possible.

I haven't had any driver problems with the Sony laptop I own. It's not like the hardware stops working when the clock hits 2014 and somehow magically needs a new driver. But also I have not wanted to upgrade that laptop to Windows 8 (and wouldn't, because of driver support).

The Sony I would recommend for you is the 15" Vaio S. (What do you mean by mid-priced?) However, maybe you should wait a bit, if you can, because a new CPU generation just came out about a week ago, and the Vaio S line is still on the previous CPU generation.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Oxxidation posted:

Oh right, I forgot how big a range laptop prices have. Something in the $1000 range tops was what came to mind.

The OS has been at the back of my mind, because I've been using XL all my life. Stupid question probably, but is it possible to get XL on one of those newer machines if you still have the install discs, or would be silly/not worth the hassle?

XL? You mean XP? That would be a pretty bad idea. Windows 7 is, for example, an obvious major improvement over XP. No argument can be made! (But is Windows 8? Echhh...)

You should just go with the Windows 8 that's installed on the machine, though. It's fine once you get used to it, which is a sad way of putting it. You have to relearn how to navigate to certain programs like the control panel. It'll get a service pack update (called 8.1, apparently) which allegedly alleviates some of its annoyances.

The base model of Vaio S, which I think has a good screen, is $830 on Sony's website right now.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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DEO3 posted:

My wife is an amateur photographer that's asked me to help her pick out a new 15" laptop to be used for photo editing and storage.

Because her current laptop is nearly six years old we both assumed that anything we could buy today would be a massive upgrade, and so we were only looking to spend like $500. But since she'll be using it for photography is seems like a good display is an absolute must, and it turns out that just isn't possible for $500. In fact, it doesn't look like a 1920x1080 IPS panel is available anywhere for under $1000 - with only one exception that I've been able to find: Sony's S15, which I can configure with an IPS for $830. Before we pull the trigger, is there anything else out there under $1000 that we should be considering?

I haven't looked closely at the Vaio Fit 15E's reviews but I think it has a good or pretty good display for around <$600. That might not be true, maybe it merely has a decent 1920x1080 display.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Cream_Filling posted:

The screen in the T530 is a TN screen, however it is a very good TN screen with good color reproduction. The IPS in the Sony is alright, though lots of people complain about it having color issues with red-orange.

Orangegate was fixed late autumn last year.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Chop Suey posted:

I was looking into Lenovo Thinkpads, but all of those use integrated graphics.

This is not true.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Does anybody know when dual-core 37W CPUs like the i5-4300M and friends are going to be out?

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sigma 6 posted:

I am really torn here. I want a wacom digitizer with the best CPU/GPU combo I can find. At the same time, most tablets are not good enough to paint at high res with photoshop, much less sculpt in zbrush.

If you want more performance you could get a... Fujitsu T902, which has a GT 630M.

Reviews have said that the Thinkpad Helix has a screen that seems very close to the touch surface. I'd also say the same thing of the Vaio Duo 11, which also had a perfectly accurate touchscreen all the way to the edges, instead of having inaccuracy in the last centimeter. Both are 11.6" 1920x1080, but CPU performance isn't great in either case. The Vaio Duo 13 with an i7-4650U, which has HD Graphics 5000, might be your best bet, as soon as it's released.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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WHERE MY HAT IS AT posted:

Just came to post this.
That SLI 750s has to be a misprint, right? That would be some sweet gaming power in a small form factor if it's not.

The second 750M replaces the optical drive in the ultrabay.

Edit: You can get SLI in the Y510p, but not the Y410p.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Lblitzer posted:

http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/21/4445492/lenovo-thinkpad-helix-review

A laptop/tablet hybrid by Lenovo. Looks pretty solid, but this review seems to bash on it a bit for not being as stylish as a Macbook Air or Vaio (both of which are not hybrids fyi).

(I am a whore, and) I just got one today. Right now I've got 4h 13m remaining with 55% battery left, at full screen brightness. The keyboard is good (you might have worried about the 1.6mm stroke depth), the trackpad is good, trackpoint is good (you might see it and worry about lack of exclusive buttons, but no, that's not a problem at all), screen is good, digitizer may need some calibration out of the box. My only nitpick is that getting the trackpoint middle mouse click to behave like a middle mouse click, and not scrolling, requires editing some registry entries, which I haven't done yet.

It was much cheaper to get it from Amazon with 1 day shipping (and I am paying sales tax) than from the B & N gold portal.

Edit: The Verge is retarded, and if you ever meet anybody that works there, you should spill your drink on them. They call machines with 4:3 screens or 16:10 screens "outdated" and they talk about superficial aspects of the products they review because they're superficial people themselves.

shrughes fucked around with this message at 06:18 on Jun 22, 2013

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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voltron posted:

What laptop has the nicest (understand that's subjective) screen? I am looking for a 15" screen that has great visuals. I think integrated video will do fine for my purposes (Counter-strike, Q3, and 1080p video).

A good <$1000 option would be the 15" Vaio S, which has a 1920x1080 IPS screen starting at $830. The T530 with just the screen upgrade might be about the same, if you find the right discount.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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Thinkpads used to be pretty:


But now they're just so drab:

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sigma 6 posted:

drat. Looks like the Helix drivers don't support pressure sensitivity. WTF?!!? The hardware is rated for 2k levels of sensitivity but doesn't work.

That drivers issue was about pressure sensitivity in certain applications like Photoshop. Pressure sensitivity existed and worked in other situations. Drivers are out that fix the problem (but I don't have Photoshop, haven't verified myself, but there are videos).

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sigma 6 posted:

Hmmmm. So, is it safe to assume that the driver issue will be solved eventually for software like zbrush and photoshop?
I don't know.

quote:

Is it also safe to assume there will be no Haswell version of X320T because the Helix is the succesor to the X320T?
No. The Helix is probably not a successor to the X230t (there is no X320T), they smell different. The successor might be more Thinkpad Twist-like, with a digitizer, if it is vastly different.

quote:

I don't really like the idea of half the device swiveling on one point.
At least you can't drop the screen that way. This also means the guts of the machine are in the base, and the device is not top-heavy, and can have a lower overall weight since the base doesn't need to counterbalance the top. And better performance. Maybe they should make a rip-and-flip tablet that uses Intel Wireless Display technology -- you can't use the tablet far away from the base station though, which I'm sure a bunch of idiots would then complain about and give the device bad ratings.

quote:

Is there any other reason to go with the Helix over the X320T? Seems like some don't like the build quality of the Helix here.
I haven't seen anybody specifically talking about its build quality here so I don't know about that. It is less likely to survive being thrown against a wall, certainly. The only reason to prefer the Helix that I can think of, that isn't plainly listed on spec sheets, would be if the X230t doesn't have a very good trackpad. The X230 has a lot of whiners about its trackpad, and maybe the X230t's is also bad. Maybe it's merely small. There are also a bunch of non-obvious deficiencies with the Thinkpad Helix you could mention.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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sports posted:

There's really no point in getting a quad-core processor today when most dual cores virtualize 2 more cores themselves.

Good lord, stop posting.

(Megaman: He's wrong, obviously. A quad-core CPU will have twice the L3 cache and twice the number of cores. If you care about CPU performance or something... well, is quad-core that important? If you want a lightweight quad-core laptop, the best choices are probably the 15" retina MacBook Pro, the 15" Panasonic CF-B11, the 14" Dell Latitude E6430, and maybe the 14" Razor Blade, if its quality is good. They all come in at about 4 lbs. But the Clevo W110ER is the 11.6" that can be configured with a quad-core CPU. You'll have to read its reviews yourself.)

Edit: Here's a review comparing the Clevo W110ER against other machines: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2410891,00.asp

Note the benchmark list comparing the benchmarks against the similarly outfitted Alienware M14x. The cooling capabilities of the machine limit its performance.

shrughes fucked around with this message at 03:56 on Jun 26, 2013

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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DrDork posted:

Normally I'd agree, but everyone else seems to be taking the Haswell refresh as an opportunity to pump up the screens, so there's more hope than usual this time around.

On the other hand, the 14" Razer Blade has the typical bad 14" 1600x900 screen that has been typical for the past couple of years. We've seen one slide that mentioned 1080p on 14", and that was in some Dell presentation, and I think it said or implied that 14" Latitudes (or some other boring Dell laptop) would have 1920x1080 screens. Well, the Alienware 14 has a very nice 1920x1080 screen option, so it seems that other Dells have some hope in that department.

With Lenovo we've seen a quite good 1600x900 screen on the X1 Carbon, and recently the 1600x900 upgrade on the T430 was only $20. The T431s reporting has better contrast than the T430 and T430s (according to notebookcheck.net) but is still pretty bad in the viewing angle department. Maybe they're trying to burn out inventory or some other contract in order to make way for better screens, but if that is true, will it be T431s screens or X1 Carbon screens? My bet is the T431s and T440 or whatever will have T431s-type screens (with somewhat better contrast, still low quality) while the X1 Carbon will continue having its kind of screen. Remember that Lenovo is in the business of making business laptops for cheap, and a screen quality improvement on its low-end offerings (remember we're talking about a $600-700 laptop here) isn't going to show up on its spec sheet.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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An ASUS UX21A perhaps. I'm not sure this model actually existed or if it was just a prank that ASUS played on reviewers.

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shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

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For graphics cards? Well there's the NotebookCheck.net gaming list.

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