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sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Adding color to the mandala. Sorry about the blurry pic. It is metallic blue. I also have metallic purple and green. Just not sure which should be the outer vs. inner colors.

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Hellbeard
Apr 8, 2002


Please report me if you see me post in GBS so a moderator may bulldoze my account like a palestinian school.


Cyberpunk cats, ink on cartridge paper/bristol

goodness
Jan 3, 2012

When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?


Hellbeard posted:

Cyberpunk cats, ink on cartridge paper/bristol



This and all your posts are so good!

Radio du Cambodge
Dec 3, 2007



I painted this longboard (found it on the street this past spring).

The white stands out from the mint green a bit better in person. Even so I probably could have added a little drop shadow to make it pop more... But it is too late now as I have coated it in epoxy! Acrylics and National Geographic (collage). The random black marks at the top are where the holes are going to be for the screws to attach the trucks.


Detail:

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer

Anyone have recommendations for sumi brushes? I'm not going to break the bank for a set. It'd be mainly used for india ink, watercolors, and maybe gouache. These are the two sets I'm looking at:

MasterChinese Fine Chinese Calligraphy / Sumi Drawing / Kanji Brush Set (Goat Hair, Jian Hair, Wolf Hair) - Medium

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GNLKHZ...d=26CQ65HSQHEJ3

I'm open to other suggestions, but I'd prefer to buy it through Amazon (doesn't have to be Prime if it's worth the wait).


For content, I made some Critters with watercolors. I need to go over the india ink lines again, the ones on the left face are too defined compared to the other lines (partially form the lighting, partially from the ink). Maybe add some shadows. Any other ideas are welcome.

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



Radio du Cambodge posted:

I painted this longboard (found it on the street this past spring).

The white stands out from the mint green a bit better in person. Even so I probably could have added a little drop shadow to make it pop more... But it is too late now as I have coated it in epoxy! Acrylics and National Geographic (collage). The random black marks at the top are where the holes are going to be for the screws to attach the trucks.


Detail:



This is really cool.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

Question for the 'crylicers and the oilies,

I am having a discussion with some friends about favored brands. Are you brand loyal or do you use a mix? I tend to have a range of paints from different brands, though I have some general preferences.

That said, the enormous bulk of my acrylics are Golden, Liquitex, Utrecht, and Old Holland. I have one or two Holbein in there too, very nice. I'd probably go all Old Holland and Holbein if price were no object. Holbein is a little smooth though and doesn't get me in the traditional art mindset as well as Old Holland.

Meanwhile, almost all my oils are Winsor & Newton or Williamsburg, where Williamsburg is absolutely my brand of choice. Quite a bit of Old Holland also, but only in the A and B series because Old Holland prices make my rear end in a top hat clench. Some Holbein also (excellent) and inherited some random Grumbacher (okay). I have one tube of Gamblin I got on sale and I hate it.

Other experiences?

Anagram of GINGER
Oct 3, 2014

by Smythe


I was turned on to Novacolor by my painting professor.

https://www.novacolorpaint.com/

It's a cut above whatever you'll find at art supply stores. It's a local brand in Los Angeles. Their building is tiny and you have to get buzzed in at the door. All around awesome.

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Elsa posted:

I was turned on to Novacolor by my painting professor.

https://www.novacolorpaint.com/

It's a cut above whatever you'll find at art supply stores. It's a local brand in Los Angeles. Their building is tiny and you have to get buzzed in at the door. All around awesome.

Craola also uses the same paint.

God, I miss L.A.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Pick posted:

Meanwhile, almost all my oils are Winsor & Newton or Williamsburg, where Williamsburg is absolutely my brand of choice. Quite a bit of Old Holland also, but only in the A and B series because Old Holland prices make my rear end in a top hat clench. Some Holbein also (excellent) and inherited some random Grumbacher (okay). I have one tube of Gamblin I got on sale and I hate it.

Other experiences?
My thoughts on oils (though I guess it really kind of depends on your painting technique so my experience might very well be garbage if you paint in a really different way from me):

Winsor & Newton is blech for the most part. Just weird and the color tones don't match up well with other brands—they're playing pretty fast and loose with color formulations, I'd guess.

Williamsburg is pretty good. I like their flake white.

Old Holland is good but not (in my opinion) good enough to justify the additional cost for most colors.

Holbein in general is pretty good. Their Ceramic White is super good for white glazes (translucent, has kind of a faint glowy-blue tinge to it).

Michael Harding is good for a lot of different colors. Their Ultramarine Blue, Payne's Grey, Viridian, and Prussian Blue are ones I especially like (their prussian blue in particular is for glazing and goes forever). They also make really good ochres. Their other earth tones are good but because they don't tend to put additives, the earth tones quickly separate in the tube. Harding also makes good stacked lead and foundation whites.

Most of my paints, though, are M. Graham. I like their earth tones (especially umbers and Mars Black) for their even consistency, but if you're a no-additives only-crushed-rocks kind of person I guess they'd be a no-no. Their Quin Rose is probably the best I've tried—if you've had trouble finding a good lightfast magenta, I'd definitely recommend it. They've got a lovely diox purple too. M. Graham is inexpensive, too.

For my base whites, I mainly use Permalba White. Pretty divisive color; a lot of people hate its consistency, but it's a nice strong white that holds up pretty well, durability-wise, for a titanium white (and I'm not really comfortable using a lead as my primary white for most paintings because I don't trust myself to be careful enough with it).

e: oh and for acrylics, I like Liquitex and Daniel Smith but I just looked it up and Daniel Smith doesn't even make acrylics anymore oh well, I wouldn't take my advice on acrylics anyway since I don't do a lot of that!

a hole-y ghost fucked around with this message at Sep 27, 2017 around 05:42

Anagram of GINGER
Oct 3, 2014

by Smythe



Wow nice

Some of that looks like the opaque liquid ink I forget the name of. Seems like fun to use.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

Yeah I should note my Winsor & Newton were my starter set I bought as a used estate item, I'd never use them as my core now. I have some sampler MHarding but I've never used them since they're colors outside my usual gamut. I should try them--thanks!

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Yeah. Again, huge grain of salt, different techniques, etc...trying out different brands is what's most important. If you have painter friends that are cool with it I'd recommend painting with them and trying out some of theirs to try out different paints without having to buy them.

Anagram of GINGER
Oct 3, 2014

by Smythe


but

that requires hanging out with people irl

lol and yeah when it comes time to buy, split the cost and the paint with someone. As a side note, I recently gave my traditional art supplies to a friend's kid. The Novacolor paint was two years old by that point but hadn't separated one bit.

Radio du Cambodge
Dec 3, 2007



smallmouth posted:

This is really cool.

Thank you. Here is a photo of both the skateboards I've done, resin-protected and trucks attached, ready to ride.



Didn't realize this photo came out so blurry. Oh well. Just showin off anyway

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Trying something new out



Looking at some wood carvings at an exhibit, my wife foolishly says to me "why don't you try that?" I wasn't sure my block printing tools were up for hardwood, but after a sharpening they've been champs (if maybe a little small for blocking out)

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

^ Hey look, I just used my block carving tools too!

Wanted to make a wedding gift for friends and settled on a picture frame made of black palm and maple splines. Then figured it'd be dumb to give them an empty one, so why not make a print of the two of them and include it? I simply couldn't pull off a way to print their faces using any kind of tone techniques like hatching without making them look fantastically old, so I basically admitted defeat and settled on... contouring? I don't know what to call this, but it came out looking a bit comic book-style. Anyway:





I really need to work on my printing. The brayer-and-spoon technique sorta worked, but I really wish I could find a decent press for a price that won't make my eyes water.

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Trabant posted:

I really need to work on my printing. The brayer-and-spoon technique sorta worked, but I really wish I could find a decent press for a price that won't make my eyes water.

Time to build a jack press!

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Yup, you're right. I tried going the "simple" way and building one powered by a caulking gun, but the resulting print was terrible. I'm pretty confident I built it well enough, so either the gun I was using was somehow bad, or the plywood was warped as hell.

Harbor Freight sells a thing that is almost there. I just need to figure out a good way to mount the plates (and pray that the pig iron their tools use doesn't fold like an accordion).

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Inktober floats.

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Trabant posted:

Yup, you're right. I tried going the "simple" way and building one powered by a caulking gun, but the resulting print was terrible. I'm pretty confident I built it well enough, so either the gun I was using was somehow bad, or the plywood was warped as hell.

Harbor Freight sells a thing that is almost there. I just need to figure out a good way to mount the plates (and pray that the pig iron their tools use doesn't fold like an accordion).

I'd wager a caulking gun doesn't need you near enough pressure for anything more than rubber stamp size. The harbor freight thing looks interesting, but I'd be worried about supporting the bottom plate since it doesn't look like you have much room to play with (fwiw I have not yet built a jack stand, so I could be talking out of my rear end)

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Day two of inktober.

R.I.P. Tom Petty.



Ballpoint and copics. FYI alchohol based markers will make ballpoint ink bleed if you don't wait long enough for it to dry. Woops.

Hometown Slime Queen
Oct 26, 2004

the GOAT





Little portraits of my parents' cats. They loved them. My mother said the lovely fat white and gray one's personality is perfectly captured.

Handen
Jun 29, 2003




GOD
I
FUKKKIN
LOVE
THE
LAST
JEDI




A few weeks ago a friend tipped me off about an estate sale a block from my place. The woman who had lived there was an artist, and the house was loaded with art supplies. Stupid me, I drove by on the Friday and thought to myself "There's probably nothing good in there," and kept on driving. The next day when I heard what was available I ran my rear end over there as fast as I could, but most of the good stuff was gone. A whole bunch of expensive paper, a poo poo-tonne of brushes, paint tubes, easels, you name it: all gone.

With one exception: A tackle box FULL of pastels for only $40.

As I was rummaging around in the shed fighting for the last scraps of whatever might be left over, a middle aged woman asked me "Are you an artist?" "Yeah-huh." "What medium do you work with?" "Pastels," I said, grinning ear-to-ear about my find. The kind of smirk she gave me was like "Yeah, sure kid, nobody uses pastels," and then her and her husband started arguing about whether the envelopes in the flat storage tray could be used for watercolour. Bitch please. Take your trash and get the gently caress out my face.

Inside that tackle box were some pretty useful flesh tones that even my Holbein 48 set can't match. Unfortunately I've now used up all of them and when I went to go find them, I discovered Winsor & Newton stopped making soft pastels 7 years ago. So now I'm trying to hunt down old Winsor & Newton portrait sets. Their titanium white was off the loving chain.

Below are two portraits I've done so far. The first one was a little more straightforward than the second, but I'm less than enthusiastic about the pseudo flat illustrative look. The second one I had all sorts of problems, from blending proficiency, to overworking the nose until the paper couldn't take any more abuse, but I think I stumbled onto something painterly about pastels in the process that might be worth exploring a lot more.

Both soft pastel with Conte a Paris highlights on BFK Rives.



Handen fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2017 around 07:49

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

^^^ Gorgeous work! ^^^

4th inktober is my little tribute to Popaganda / Ron English.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer


These are absolutely beautiful and now I want to play with pastels, which I haven't used since high school maybe. Never got the knack for them.

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



I haven't ventured into the more expensive brands of oils yet. It's good to hear some recommendations. I have not been happy with Gamblin, and W&N are so so. But they're affordable, so it's what I've been working with.

Edit: although Gamblin Neo Megilp is great.

smallmouth fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2017 around 19:41

Handen
Jun 29, 2003




GOD
I
FUKKKIN
LOVE
THE
LAST
JEDI




Franchescanado posted:

These are absolutely beautiful and now I want to play with pastels, which I haven't used since high school maybe. Never got the knack for them.

You absolutely should! The trick is to use a french paper called BFK Rives. It's surface is like soft cotton and it can soak-in pastels and charcoals the same way Arches soaks-in watercolour (but you really need to work it in with your fingers.) I would recommend getting the feel of the paper with compressed charcoal and a number of vinyl erasers first. It's almost a better subtractive medium than additive, and I find to get the most out of it you need to learn where the additive/subtractive qualities of BFK meet up and complement one another. It's more like sculpting than drawing.

Handen fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2017 around 22:34

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

smallmouth posted:

I haven't ventured into the more expensive brands of oils yet. It's good to hear some recommendations. I have not been happy with Gamblin, and W&N are so so. But they're affordable, so it's what I've been working with.

Edit: although Gamblin Neo Megilp is great.

I hate to be the person who does this, but I hate hate hate hate hate Gamblin. It's like painting with soup.

Pick fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2017 around 01:17

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



Pick posted:

I hate to be the person who does this, but I hate hate hate hate hate Gamblin. It's like painting with soup.

Yeah, I've switched to buying W&N, which I’m still not crazy about. Has anyone tried Black brand oils?

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

Does Utrecht do oils? I know they are often thought of as a student brand, but their acrylics are actually pretty all right.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



They do. I've heard they have a good pigment load, especially for earths, but that's friend-of-friend hearsay. No one I've worked with uses them so

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

a hole-y ghost posted:

They do. I've heard they have a good pigment load, especially for earths, but that's friend-of-friend hearsay. No one I've worked with uses them so

I might get a tube someday then for comparison. At the moment I basically have the gamut of any oil colors I can reasonably see myself using, except perhaps some of Williamsburg's inexplicably Series 4 earth tones. "Brown Pink", the stupidest name for the best paint. All their earth tones are uniquely to die for .

FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


Who makes the best brown pink? I've only ever gotten it from gamblin

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



What is brown pink suited for? I've never used it

snucks
Nov 3, 2008

Try again. Fail again. Fail better.


First nude study in a while. 6 hour (!) pose.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Whoa! Thanks for the progress animation, that's cool!

Radio du Cambodge
Dec 3, 2007




I like the colors, the second one is a tricky angle and looks a little off, maybe just due to the unfamiliar angle, the chin? It's believable though and it's rendered really nice. I like the expression in the first one too, translates well.


I painted this picture based on a little doodle in my sketchbook. Mostly acrylics and housepaint with some marker. I don't really know how to paint and don't really like using a brush, I would rather do screenprinting or something more flat, sharp, and predictable. I have a friend with all the gear just haven't really pursued it.

Pick
Jul 19, 2009

I don't mind taking charity from those that I despise.

Baby I don't need your love.

Nap Ghost

FunkyAl posted:

Who makes the best brown pink? I've only ever gotten it from gamblin

WILLIAMSBUUURGGG!!

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sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

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