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Pixelante
Mar 15, 2006

You people will by God act like a team, or at least like people who know each other, or I'll incinerate the bunch of you here and now.


I love my watercolours, though mostly use them in mixed media. I like using them for backgrounds, then drawing on top of them. I also love that a tiny palette box can easily get tossed into my carry-on luggage--much easier than carrying a bunch of alcohol markers. I use a mix of Daniel Smith, Qor, and Opus store brand. The DS Primatek line is fascinating!

fake e: Anyone know if I can mix alcohol ink with acrylic medium? I'm hoping to use Golden coarse medium to create a mineral/gem like appearance, so the colour needs to be a bit translucent.

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silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008



I have a fine art degree in painting and watercolors are just looked down of for dumbshit reasons.

The gallery art community is a loving cesspool of assholes (in my experience) and it killed my desire to make art for years.

Do you and do what makes you happy. There's something for everyone out there.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018





WIP on a big ol' painting, 10"x36", for my dad's birthday. Can you guess what he's into? I'm using funky water-soluable oil paints, I love them, they feel so luxurious compared to my usual drawing. Also slow as hell, but I guess that's part of it. Sorry about the glare, not too easy to get the whole thing in shot and well-lit.

e: Another session on this today.



still going, fingers still sausages but at least I know where they all are now.

lofi fucked around with this message at Dec 16, 2018 around 20:40

Sephirine
Aug 6, 2006

Ook ook.

lofi posted:



WIP on a big ol' painting, 10"x36", for my dad's birthday. Can you guess what he's into? I'm using funky water-soluable oil paints, I love them, they feel so luxurious compared to my usual drawing. Also slow as hell, but I guess that's part of it. Sorry about the glare, not too easy to get the whole thing in shot and well-lit.

e: Another session on this today.



still going, fingers still sausages but at least I know where they all are now.


Really cool idea! Looking forward to how it will look when it is finished. Im sure your father will be proud
Love those water-soluable oils. A LOT less odor!

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



Thanks! I'm kinda terrified of doing the strings, that'll be right at the end and a lovely chance to ruin the whole thing.

Do you know if masking tape / masking fluid work on oils? Would they just pull the paint up?

Jack Daniels
Nov 14, 2002


Slippery Tilde

anyone use Clayboard ? sounds like fun from what people are saying. GIVE ME YOUR TIPS AND TRICKS



edit: claybord

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Jack Daniels posted:

anyone use Clayboard ? sounds like fun from what people are saying. GIVE ME YOUR TIPS AND TRICKS



edit: claybord

Use an xacto #12 or scalpel to do any scraping, the standard #11 is useless. Pelikan tusche ink is the best dip ink I know, cheaper India inks tend to sit crustily on top. Watercolor would probably work but I havenít tried.

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


I don't do Inktober because I always draw with ink and I usually work on longer-term projects, so I thought I'd do "Leadcember" where I only use graphite (it still looks like pen, really)

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sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Huge fan of your style. Very graphic design / tattoo design - ish.

Some Krampus doodles.

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


sigma 6 posted:

Huge fan of your style. Very graphic design / tattoo design - ish.

Some Krampus doodles.



Thanks yo! I will post a few more. I've been told by like a million people that I should start being a tattoo artist, even though I'm old an poo poo now. Diggin the Krampus drawings

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Jack Daniels
Nov 14, 2002


Slippery Tilde

dupersaurus posted:

Use an xacto #12 or scalpel to do any scraping, the standard #11 is useless. Pelikan tusche ink is the best dip ink I know, cheaper India inks tend to sit crustily on top. Watercolor would probably work but I havenít tried.

Dr. VooDoo
May 4, 2006



Iím watching watercolor with shibasaki videos for keys and tips on watercolors but his brush video doesnt explain a whole lot. What sort of range of brushes should I be starting off with? Just one and gonfrom there or should I grab a couple to get used to what each does and is used for?

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

As he says, too big is better than too small. You can do a ton with just a one-inch flat, a half-inch flat, a big round brush (like he uses, I believe the Japanese tradition is a goat-hair brush), and a small round brush (size 4 or so). Another option is to buy this Silver Brush Black Velvet three-pack, it comes with a cat's tongue brush (very versatile), a rigger (kind of annoying) and a small round.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK1YD174kGo

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



Hey, I can finally post this:


Kitbash/sculpy-sculpt I made for xmas for the bf (goon, so I couldn't post it before just in case), of the main character in the computer game he's coding. I'm dead pleased with it, given sculpting isn't really my area. She's about 6" tall.

Dr. VooDoo
May 4, 2006



Neon Noodle posted:

As he says, too big is better than too small. You can do a ton with just a one-inch flat, a half-inch flat, a big round brush (like he uses, I believe the Japanese tradition is a goat-hair brush), and a small round brush (size 4 or so). Another option is to buy this Silver Brush Black Velvet three-pack, it comes with a cat's tongue brush (very versatile), a rigger (kind of annoying) and a small round.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK1YD174kGo

Thank you!

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



Still working on this. I've had a weird thing where one of my greys is WAY more matte than my others. I think it's where I've used white in the mix vs. just colours. I'm hoping a glaze layer and varnish will even it out a bit. I have so had enough of this fucken picture.

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

lofi posted:

Still working on this. I've had a weird thing where one of my greys is WAY more matte than my others. I think it's where I've used white in the mix vs. just colours. I'm hoping a glaze layer and varnish will even it out a bit. I have so had enough of this fucken picture.


Looks great IMO but I would even out the background a bit. Big strokes seem like they could be blended back more.

Jack Daniels
Nov 14, 2002


Slippery Tilde

Jack Daniels posted:

anyone use Clayboard ? sounds like fun from what people are saying. GIVE ME YOUR TIPS AND TRICKS



edit: claybord

UPDATE: this stuff is cool

edit: very cool

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Jack Daniels posted:

UPDATE: this stuff is cool

edit: very cool

It really is. I should get back to it.

Be careful, it might be a gateway drug to printmaking.

Pixelante
Mar 15, 2006

You people will by God act like a team, or at least like people who know each other, or I'll incinerate the bunch of you here and now.


Jack Daniels posted:

UPDATE: this stuff is cool

edit: very cool

I'm afraid to ask. I already have so many hobbies.

Jack Daniels
Nov 14, 2002


Slippery Tilde

dupersaurus posted:

It really is. I should get back to it.

Be careful, it might be a gateway drug to printmaking.

I can... sense that somehow *shoves behind me 30 different X-acto and carving tools purchased*

Jack Daniels
Nov 14, 2002


Slippery Tilde

Pixelante posted:

I'm afraid to ask. I already have so many hobbies.

Pixelante posted:

I love my watercolours, though mostly use them in mixed media. I like using them for backgrounds, then drawing on top of them. I also love that a tiny palette box can easily get tossed into my carry-on luggage--much easier than carrying a bunch of alcohol markers. I use a mix of Daniel Smith, Qor, and Opus store brand. The DS Primatek line is fascinating!

fake e: Anyone know if I can mix alcohol ink with acrylic medium? I'm hoping to use Golden coarse medium to create a mineral/gem like appearance, so the colour needs to be a bit translucent.



the mixed media folks go wild for this claboard stuff.......... be safe, and good luck

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


Here's a tinted gesso painting I did of my cat Bubby about 20 years ago

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Flavius Aetass
Mar 30, 2011

"what is a turpm" *throws mickeys bottle down*



That's excellent

Day Man
Jul 30, 2007

Champion of the Sun!

Master of karate and friendship...
for everyone!




Hi everyone! The wife and I decided painting sounded like a fun hobby, so we got a bunch of acryllic paints and some canvases and gave it a go. I have no idea what I'm doing really, the only art classes I've ever taken were sculpture and ceramics way back in high school. This was my first attempt at an actual painting.

Any tips or advice on resources to learn more about painting?

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



https://www.ctrlpaint.com/library/ is focused on digital painting, but a lot of the same lessons will apply. I find charity shops to be a really good source of painting books.

Do you draw any? Skill at drawing will help you work out what you want to paint before you start.

Finally got some decent photos sorted of this thing, all done and sitting above my dad's study door. He loved it.

Day Man
Jul 30, 2007

Champion of the Sun!

Master of karate and friendship...
for everyone!


lofi posted:

https://www.ctrlpaint.com/library/ is focused on digital painting, but a lot of the same lessons will apply. I find charity shops to be a really good source of painting books.

Do you draw any? Skill at drawing will help you work out what you want to paint before you start.

Finally got some decent photos sorted of this thing, all done and sitting above my dad's study door. He loved it.


I have always felt like I am terrible at drawing. Lack of skill in drawing is part of why I never tried painting when I was younger. It doesnít appeal to me as much, but I always thought of it as sort of a prerequisite to painting. I never felt I had gotten good enough at it to graduate to painting.

I suppose I could give it another go, but painting appeals to me a lot more for some reason I canít quite explain. I guess I like that painting seems to lend itself more to abstraction, and can still look good without the ability to be photorealistic.

I absolutely love your painting, btw! Both the concept and the execution.

Edit: I know itís probably cliche, but I always loved watching Bob Ross and seeing all the little almost accidental brush stokes that end up looking like planned details. I never feel like I can properly plan out a detailed sketch, and am hoping to find those sorts of happy accidents and spontaneity.

Day Man fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2019 around 01:16

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



Hah, you really need advice from someone else then, I'm super anal in my art, everything is planned in detail first.

I'm ambivalent about Bob. He's a great showman, but I think he undersells how much skill and understanding he has that make his happy accidents so much more likely.

The advice everyone will agree on is 'practice' - paint what's fun for you, do formal exercises if you want to, change medium from time to time, just make sure to keep painting.

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Yeah, as much as we love Bob, what you see is decades of experience and training, and him using as a template a painting he had made before taping that was sitting just off-camera. A lot of planning and experience go into making those happy accidents.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer

Day Man posted:

I have always felt like I am terrible at drawing. Lack of skill in drawing is part of why I never tried painting when I was younger. It doesnít appeal to me as much, but I always thought of it as sort of a prerequisite to painting. I never felt I had gotten good enough at it to graduate to painting.

I suppose I could give it another go, but painting appeals to me a lot more for some reason I canít quite explain. I guess I like that painting seems to lend itself more to abstraction, and can still look good without the ability to be photorealistic.

I think that this is fine. You don't have to be an expert at drawing or drafting to start learning to paint. You can learn both at the same time. As everyone mentioned, it just takes practice and time. Luckily it's the most fun way to practice and spend your time!

See if you can find this book at your local library, or just go ahead and order it: Learn to Paint with 50 Small Paintings. That'll teach you fundamentals, give you a list of paints to get, and give you step-by-step instructions that you can follow, or you can improvise your own ideas with the same concepts. It's a really nice ice-breaker.

Go to your local arts and crafts place and buy a bunch of small canvases (Joanne's, for instance, always has a bunch of ridiculously good sales on canvases). Canvas Paper is also good for practicing skills and getting confident.

And watch painting tutorials! Hop on YouTube and search for someone painting what you're interested in, and then watch how they approach it. You'll see some things you'll like, and other things you'll want to avoid, but it'll get you excited to paint. The rest is up to you.

Buy a bunch of white paint. If you gently caress up, you can always paint over it and start fresh.

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Zoben posted:

Here's a tinted gesso painting I did of my cat Bubby about 20 years ago



Gorgeous. I had to look really closely to see that it was actually a painting. Amazing work. A lot of people find this kind of realism boring. I think they are wrong. Most people who find realism boring either lack the skill or resent the skill it takes to make something so accurate with a paintbrush.

dupersaurus posted:

Yeah, as much as we love Bob, what you see is decades of experience and training, and him using as a template a painting he had made before taping that was sitting just off-camera. A lot of planning and experience go into making those happy accidents.

Don't tell me my child hood hero and patron saint of oil painting was just another example of media manipulation!

sigma 6 fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2019 around 14:21

Parachute
May 18, 2003



the biggest problem with bob ross isn't that you have to watch tons of episodes to hear him explain very specific little details in his technique that make it work, but that the outro song volume is absurdly loud and pulls me out of my trance almost instantaneously when the credits start to roll.

Day Man
Jul 30, 2007

Champion of the Sun!

Master of karate and friendship...
for everyone!


Ordered that book from amazon. Thanks for the welcoming advice everyone! I have been having a lot of fun just messing around so far, wish I had started sooner!

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


sigma 6 posted:

Gorgeous. I had to look really closely to see that it was actually a painting. Amazing work. A lot of people find this kind of realism boring. I think they are wrong. Most people who find realism boring either lack the skill or resent the skill it takes to make something so accurate with a paintbrush.

Thanks! Oddly enough though, I'm kind of in the "realism is boring" camp these days, as I did realism a lot when I was 18-24 and that was a long time ago so I've developed my style into something that's more interesting to me. Nothing wrong with people doing realistic art, as you have to utilize a very advanced level of technique and skill, but I like to see brushstrokes and more stylistic flourishes instead of something that looks just like a photo.

That being said, I think that most artists should learn solid and realistic techniques first before delving into stylistic approaches. When I was a teacher, I was always annoyed by students who were so influenced by anime and made all of their drawings in a cute anime style, it was super loving annoying. An exercise where they were supposed to reproduce Da Vinci's "Vitruvian Man" with graphite as well as they could (the curriculum was pretty sucky and I had to re-write a lot of it in my own time, yay) resulted in a lot of super kawaii huge anime eyes and ridiculous tiny noses and mouths. I tried to impart to them that while I have a personal distaste for anime/manga, the best artists in that genre (and any genre) learned how to do life drawing and studied anatomy before they moved on to stylization. Then I killed them all with a shotgun lmao

EmmyOk
Aug 11, 2013



Why do I need to learn real anatomy when I'm drawing comics!!

Also every manga or comic artist will still tell you to learn anatomy and drawing from life and to go back and practice it whenever you're in a rut or want to improve.

FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


Zoben posted:

Thanks! Oddly enough though, I'm kind of in the "realism is boring" camp these days, as I did realism a lot when I was 18-24 and that was a long time ago so I've developed my style into something that's more interesting to me. Nothing wrong with people doing realistic art, as you have to utilize a very advanced level of technique and skill, but I like to see brushstrokes and more stylistic flourishes instead of something that looks just like a photo.

That being said, I think that most artists should learn solid and realistic techniques first before delving into stylistic approaches. When I was a teacher, I was always annoyed by students who were so influenced by anime and made all of their drawings in a cute anime style, it was super loving annoying. An exercise where they were supposed to reproduce Da Vinci's "Vitruvian Man" with graphite as well as they could (the curriculum was pretty sucky and I had to re-write a lot of it in my own time, yay) resulted in a lot of super kawaii huge anime eyes and ridiculous tiny noses and mouths. I tried to impart to them that while I have a personal distaste for anime/manga, the best artists in that genre (and any genre) learned how to do life drawing and studied anatomy before they moved on to stylization. Then I killed them all with a shotgun lmao

i think it shows in this work even though it's a very detailed depiction. It's obviously not a photorealist thing, it's an accurate deptiction with stylization.

Realism feels more like an ethic to me than an aesthetic to me. imo.

Petr
Oct 3, 2000


I'm pretty new to watercolors. I feel like I lack precision with them, but I think I'm improving. This is a very lovely photograph of a study of a glass of water.


I have two questions:

1. How can I take better photographs or scans of my traditional works? My scanner sucks a lot, and I only have a cell phone camera. I'm willing to invest in some equipment, but not a whole bunch. I want to get more into painting, not photography.

2. I've been unable to get that cool crackly effect with salt that I've seen in some tutorials. Depending on how much water I use, the salt either dissolves and just makes a barely-visible wavy pattern, or sits there and makes an ugly dent in the paint. Could this be because I'm using M. Graham paints, which are made with honey?

lofi
Apr 2, 2018



More light makes it easier on cameras, ideally take stuff outside to photo. Also, try increasing your exposure value, a lot of cameras will see the amount of white in paper, interpret that as there being tons of light, and darken the image automatically.

With salt, you are sprinkling it on after you paint, right? I've never had any problems with it, maybe try using rock salt to make sure it won't dissolve?

Petr
Oct 3, 2000


I don't think my cell phone can adjust the exposure value. Any recommendations for affordable photography solutions?

I did try bigger salt grains - that just made it more likely to leave an ugly dimple in the paint instead of the fractally stuff I've seen.

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a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Petr posted:

I don't think my cell phone can adjust the exposure value. Any recommendations for affordable photography solutions?
Price range?

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