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Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



Made another of these gear paintings. I'm trying to make a few of them.

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Flavius Aetass
Mar 30, 2011


sigma 6 posted:

Cut CDs but yeah - creating CD shards is surprisingly difficult.

if you just fold a cd with your hand it will explode like a frag grenade

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Flavius Aetass posted:

if you just fold a cd with your hand it will explode like a frag grenade

I may need to try this to get a wider variety of fragments.

Crossposted from the Draw Every Day thread:

Not really a daily drawing as more practice with the laser burner.
Design by Eli Quinn



One more by Mr. Quinn. This one was a bitch because the settings for cardboard as so much more sensitive than wood. 1 % can make the difference between engraving vs. cutting. Must have made at least 8 trying to get settings right.

sigma 6 fucked around with this message at 06:58 on Mar 19, 2020

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


sigma 6 posted:

I may need to try this to get a wider variety of fragments.

Crossposted from the Draw Every Day thread:

Not really a daily drawing as more practice with the laser burner.
Design by Eli Quinn



One more by Mr. Quinn. This one was a bitch because the settings for cardboard as so much more sensitive than wood. 1 % can make the difference between engraving vs. cutting. Must have made at least 8 trying to get settings right.



I tried to break CDs with my hands and yes, it's quite an experience. A friend microwaved one once (on purpose) and it the interior parts cracked into a pretty cool pattern, whilst the CD stayed together.

Awesome burns man, thanks again for presenting my stuff in a different way!

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






put the CD in a bag, and then snap it? that should stop it going everywhere.

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



https://twitter.com/arianimation/st...373809690570752

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

lofi posted:

put the CD in a bag, and then snap it? that should stop it going everywhere.

Good idea!

One last burn of Zoben / Eli Quinn's work.

This one took 4 passes but it turned out much better than the last one. Like I said - wood is more forgiving than cardboard.



With wood it is a question of getting the contrast you want. With cardboard it is the same but even a tiny fraction too much will burn holes through.



I really like this!

sigma 6 fucked around with this message at 06:29 on Mar 22, 2020

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan



Hot Rope Guy


I think this is your best one yet that you've posted!

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



Thanks! I think I'm starting to get the hang of it the more I make. Next time I'm improving the mechanism for smoother turns.

Also, really like that burn. Looks like a tattoo.

okiedoke
Aug 24, 2008

I am the Doke to the Okie


So much good stuff in this thread. You're all really talented and thanks for the inspiration!

Handen
Jun 29, 2003




GOD
I
FUKKKIN
LOVE
THE
LAST
JEDI






Self-isolation/layoff means time to paint.

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Handen posted:



Self-isolation/layoff means time to paint.

This looks so good / consistent, I thought it was a filter at first.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



So I have the idea in my head that I want to do some animation cel style paintings. I remember doing them in high school using transparency paper and cheap acrylic paint, but they would frequently crack. Any advice for materials?

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

The pros use(d) cel vinyl:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2...inyl-paint.html

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






Oh, Gurney!

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



Awesome stuff guys.

Here's my latest gear painting and first commission.



https://twitter.com/arianimation/st...321303558905856

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan



Hot Rope Guy

Been working on this for a little bit, I also gilded (fake gold leaf) and "dirtied" the frame. Not sure I'm done with it yet but it's good enough for me to put on the wall to look at instead of sitting on my other desk.

okiedoke
Aug 24, 2008

I am the Doke to the Okie


I picked up painting about a year ago and really love it. Pretty much all acrylic but I've recently started to check out water colors and oils. I don't usually start anything with more than a vague idea of what I want to do, so most projects change drastically during the process. This does lead to me painting over a lot of things I don't end up liking but I'm still learning and it makes for some fun abstract textures. Sorry I can't post images inline, using the awful app and it'll only post links but here's a couple I did recently.

https://imgur.com/a/Ct88cyV
https://imgur.com/a/ntW5BKC

heavy liquid
Jan 3, 2008

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

Really enjoying using just pencils and paper lately.

Some sketchbook portraits





Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



Made another one of these. On this one the drawings line up on different spots. I think it came out a bit too busy which is why I was hesitant to do it this way as opposed to a single drawing that jumbles up and reforms, but I don't know.
Any thoughts?

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

I love these so much. I think it's fun to have them line up at different points. You could do some weirdo math poo poo with the gearing so after every X rotations, they have one cycle where they all align? But either way it's great. They're fun abstract pieces that become figurative at intervals.

ART

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



That actually can't happen with this piece because I turned the mechanism before drawing each picture so they can never align. With the other pieces it is a matter of turning it until they align or backtracking to its starting point.

It's been fun to explore this idea, I feel like I finally have a decent understanding both in design and technique.

Entenzahn
Nov 15, 2012

What will you say when
your child asks:
why did you fail Thunderdome?


Hey guys I hope this is the right thread but I tried my first watercolor project today and it was really bad and now I would like some advice.

I tried to follow a tutorial:


My result:


uhmmmm

van Gogh travel color set, Canson Montval paper, Da Vinci synthetic brush

Whenever I mixed on the van Gogh palette, it felt like my brush sucked up more of the color than it dispersed. Then on the paper, I found it incredibly hard to control the pigment/water. Sometimes I'd do a wash and run out of color halfway through, and sometimes it was the opposite. When I tried to go back in and apply more color to darken an area, or when I added water to smoothen a transition, it was like I sucked up what was there instead, and then the remaining pigment pooled up and I just pushed the stupid pool around on increasingly water-colored paint the more I worked on it. I probably sound naive but I always thought you just put the wet brush on the paper and the paint comes out.

For the background washes I'd paint wet on wet and the layer of wet would always feel either too wet or too dry. By the time I was ready to go and I was at the bottom it would already be dry again. But somehow whenever I drew straight from the pan onto the dry paper the color would stick on top like a wet drop. There's a passage where she paints tractor tracks onto the ground and then fades them out with water and then uses some of that pigment to further texture the ground and add some shadows and pffffffrrrrrrrt I laid down the first track and it became a puddle. Laid the second track down, tried to suck off some water with a paper towel, all the paint was gone. Really cool.



The color is too bright because by that point I was tired to trying to mix and 100% worked straight from the pans. I think later I slapped some black on top, if you scroll back up you can see what fine-detailed texture work I turned that into.

Sometimes when I did washes, flakes of something (paper?) started rubbing off so I'm not sure if it's a mix of bad material and my inability to manage water/pigment ratio. I think my brush is also too big for the tiny travel pots in the set, so come to think of it, it might just have been that I was unable to balance out the water in my brush with the right amount of pigment. Not sure if that's a thing. In the video she doesn't show herself watering/drying her brush so that doesn't help. I'm glad for any pointers of what to do better for my next grand project.

If nothing else I hope this at least makes aspiring artists feel a little more confident about themselves.

Entenzahn fucked around with this message at 00:10 on Apr 8, 2020

Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



Entenzahn posted:

Hey guys I hope this is the right thread but I tried my first watercolor project today and it was really bad and now I would like some advice.

Can you post a link to the tutorial too?

Anyway going by your materials, apart from differing skill levels between you and the demonstrator, the main thing that will affect how your paint works is the sort of paper you're using. Canson Montval seems to be a cellulose paper, which behaves differently from cotton papers; notably it doesn't like wet on wet techniques much because the water tends to sit on top of the paper, so it's very easy to move your wet paint around and accidentally go back to the paper. So if the tutor was using cotton paper, the techniques they used will need a bit of adjustment to work properly on cellulose paper.

Wood based paper can also start to disintegrate much sooner than cotton paper, but there are quality differences between different brands; e.g. I used an aldi pad for my pokemon pictures; it's so cheap they won't even commit to it being acid free; I also got some free practice paper from the SAA which was surprisingly rubbish (or it's possible that I was using the wrong side ), but my Hanneulle, Winsor and Newton, and even some lighter weight (200gsm) Gerstener paper are all quite robust despite being woodbased one and all.

Looking at the pictures I'd say practice some basic techniques like washes and gradated washes with your chosen paints and papers to get a feel of how they work before going straight into following a tutorial.

This was done on the Hanneuelle paper (with Arteza paints, so I'm not breaking the bank there) this on the Winsor and Newton

On both of them you can see the paint is behaving a bit strangely in places (most noticeably in the water of the swan), but I'm pretty sure that that's the paint at fault. Because the arch was done on very good quality wood paper, I was able to use glazes and wet in wet on it. (also helps that it's on a block, so it couldn't rumple up)

You can see the pokemon and fruit collection here - https://imgur.com/a/WznV2Zd they're done in a variety of media, but notably the paper was so bad, that some of my water colour pencils would lift when adding water to them.

Angrymog fucked around with this message at 00:37 on Apr 8, 2020

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

heavy liquid posted:

Really enjoying using just pencils and paper lately.

Some sketchbook portraits







These are amazing!

Carth Dookie
Jan 28, 2013



Grimey Drawer

Entenzahn posted:

Hey guys I hope this is the right thread but I tried my first watercolor project today and it was really bad and now I would like some advice.

I tried to follow a tutorial:


My result:


uhmmmm

van Gogh travel color set, Canson Montval paper, Da Vinci synthetic brush

Whenever I mixed on the van Gogh palette, it felt like my brush sucked up more of the color than it dispersed. Then on the paper, I found it incredibly hard to control the pigment/water. Sometimes I'd do a wash and run out of color halfway through, and sometimes it was the opposite. When I tried to go back in and apply more color to darken an area, or when I added water to smoothen a transition, it was like I sucked up what was there instead, and then the remaining pigment pooled up and I just pushed the stupid pool around on increasingly water-colored paint the more I worked on it. I probably sound naive but I always thought you just put the wet brush on the paper and the paint comes out.

For the background washes I'd paint wet on wet and the layer of wet would always feel either too wet or too dry. By the time I was ready to go and I was at the bottom it would already be dry again. But somehow whenever I drew straight from the pan onto the dry paper the color would stick on top like a wet drop. There's a passage where she paints tractor tracks onto the ground and then fades them out with water and then uses some of that pigment to further texture the ground and add some shadows and pffffffrrrrrrrt I laid down the first track and it became a puddle. Laid the second track down, tried to suck off some water with a paper towel, all the paint was gone. Really cool.



The color is too bright because by that point I was tired to trying to mix and 100% worked straight from the pans. I think later I slapped some black on top, if you scroll back up you can see what fine-detailed texture work I turned that into.

Sometimes when I did washes, flakes of something (paper?) started rubbing off so I'm not sure if it's a mix of bad material and my inability to manage water/pigment ratio. I think my brush is also too big for the tiny travel pots in the set, so come to think of it, it might just have been that I was unable to balance out the water in my brush with the right amount of pigment. Not sure if that's a thing. In the video she doesn't show herself watering/drying her brush so that doesn't help. I'm glad for any pointers of what to do better for my next grand project.

If nothing else I hope this at least makes aspiring artists feel a little more confident about themselves.

Get some cotton paper from arches or Saunders Waterford. Use a porcelain material for your palette. An old plate or bowl you don't care about staining or eating with again will do. If you're using a plastic palette you can "rough" the surface up ever so slightly with a dish scrubber or other very mild abrasive so that the paint doesn't do that weird thing where it all contracts back into a tiny droplet. These won't make you immediately a better painter, but it will mean that you spend less time attempting to work around the limitations of the materials (which you don't have the experience to do) and can instead spend more time getting better.


This video explains the difference that palette materials make better than I can


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uThNslBUy1I

Carth Dookie fucked around with this message at 11:18 on Apr 8, 2020

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

Entenzahn posted:

Hey guys I hope this is the right thread but I tried my first watercolor project today and it was really bad and now I would like some advice.

I tried to follow a tutorial:


My result:


uhmmmm

van Gogh travel color set, Canson Montval paper, Da Vinci synthetic brush

Whenever I mixed on the van Gogh palette, it felt like my brush sucked up more of the color than it dispersed. Then on the paper, I found it incredibly hard to control the pigment/water. Sometimes I'd do a wash and run out of color halfway through, and sometimes it was the opposite. When I tried to go back in and apply more color to darken an area, or when I added water to smoothen a transition, it was like I sucked up what was there instead, and then the remaining pigment pooled up and I just pushed the stupid pool around on increasingly water-colored paint the more I worked on it. I probably sound naive but I always thought you just put the wet brush on the paper and the paint comes out.

For the background washes I'd paint wet on wet and the layer of wet would always feel either too wet or too dry. By the time I was ready to go and I was at the bottom it would already be dry again. But somehow whenever I drew straight from the pan onto the dry paper the color would stick on top like a wet drop. There's a passage where she paints tractor tracks onto the ground and then fades them out with water and then uses some of that pigment to further texture the ground and add some shadows and pffffffrrrrrrrt I laid down the first track and it became a puddle. Laid the second track down, tried to suck off some water with a paper towel, all the paint was gone. Really cool.



The color is too bright because by that point I was tired to trying to mix and 100% worked straight from the pans. I think later I slapped some black on top, if you scroll back up you can see what fine-detailed texture work I turned that into.

Sometimes when I did washes, flakes of something (paper?) started rubbing off so I'm not sure if it's a mix of bad material and my inability to manage water/pigment ratio. I think my brush is also too big for the tiny travel pots in the set, so come to think of it, it might just have been that I was unable to balance out the water in my brush with the right amount of pigment. Not sure if that's a thing. In the video she doesn't show herself watering/drying her brush so that doesn't help. I'm glad for any pointers of what to do better for my next grand project.

If nothing else I hope this at least makes aspiring artists feel a little more confident about themselves.

You should also be using painters tape. See their clean edges? They painted past the draw area onto the tape, making it a nice full picture. You were so worried about staying within the lines you drew that you didn't give yourself any room for your washes to actually spread out and soak in. (If you can't get painters tape, you can use ScotchBlue painters tape like you find at a hardware store, or electrical tape, but you'll need to be careful when you peel it off, because it can rip the paper.)

It also sounds like you were using a small brush. Get a bigger brush, (preferably something with real hair, as they hold more water and are able to paint more consistently. Here's a video for brushes. I currently use a Princeton round with synthetic squirrel hair, size 20. Anywhere from 16-20 would be fine. The good news is, you don't have to opt for an expensive one yet, you just gotta get the size or shape. Even a wider flat brush or filbert brush will give your more ease and consistency.

Draw paint from the water pot but mix it on the palette. Use more paint rather than less.

If your paper flaked, you may need a stronger/thicker paper, or you may have just overworked the paper while it was still wet. You can speed up drying with a hair dryer, or you'll just have to be patient and let it dry enough to keep working.

Besides just re-configuring some supplies you're using, you just need practice making gradients. Here's a video with some advice. In fact, here's a whole playlist of tutorial videos by Shibasaki for beginners.

The quality of tools you use for watercolor paintings are far more apparent than with acrylics. Because it's a touchy medium, the better paint, paper and brushes you use, the more improvement and consistency you will see in your techniques and finished product. So as you practice your skills, be on the look-out for a good sale to grab a nice new brush or paper. Your DaVinci traveling set is a good starter set to learn and grow from. I still carry my first watercolor kit with me everywhere I go:


I don't actually ever use that little watercolor pen though. I just keep it in the kit and bring regular brushes with me

Once you get comfortable with using your pans, come back for advice on using paint from the tube. That'll give you way more control over your colors, pigments and opacity.

Welcome to the wonderful world of watercolor, though! It's an incredibly versatile and beautiful medium. Don't be discouraged if your early paintings aren't up to your personal standards, you aren't chasing a deadline to get in a gallery (yet). Watercolor is very trick and takes practice! And following tutorials and experimenting is a good way to learn.

Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



Franchescanado posted:


I don't actually ever use that little watercolor pen though. I just keep it in the kit and bring regular brushes with me

I've found the little waterbrushes are really useful for wetting the paint without picking up pigment - just squeeze some water out and wait a bit.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






Talking of watercolour, I'm having a problem mixing my colours to anything like a decent strength when I mix from pans (I'm fine when I mix from tubes), any advice?

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008





lofi posted:

Talking of watercolour, I'm having a problem mixing my colours to anything like a decent strength when I mix from pans (I'm fine when I mix from tubes), any advice?

I usually pre wet my watercolors and walk away for a little while to let them soften up. After 5-10 minutes they'll be soft enough to really pick up color generally.

Entenzahn
Nov 15, 2012

What will you say when
your child asks:
why did you fail Thunderdome?


This is the tutorial in question

I actually have Arches cotton paper! But I wanted to save it for when I'd start drawing proper works. Seems like this is a common mistake. I might save the Montval to sketch or practice gradients and work on the Arches for now.

I've ordered some painter's tape and a porcelain palette, so hoping this will erase some of the hassle. The Princeton Neptune is not available here (looks like there's a huge difference in what brush brands are available in Europe vs America) but I'll look for something similar. I'm not sure about the brush size though. Mine is already twice as large as the pan and it feels akward. But I'll give it a try. I've got a lot of leftover beer money since the lockdown hit so if all else fails I can still order a set with larger pans.

I'll definitely practice more gradients and washes. Thank you everyone for the advice and all the links you've sent, I'm taking a look at all of them. Captain Lime is pretty dope lol

I'll be back.

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008





Oil underpainting for a crow painting i'm working on. Think i'm gonna put some cherry blossoms behind it, not in love with the background from the original photo.

Zoben
Oct 3, 2001


Chernabog posted:

Awesome stuff guys.

Here's my latest gear painting and first commission.



https://twitter.com/arianimation/st...321303558905856

Wow! Those are really awesome, I love kinetic art, especially when it's interactive like that. Initially I thought it was a 3d tiered effect where you were painting on static gears mounted on the canvas (cool in its own right), but seeing the video really pops it into context.

I just did finished one of my crazy over-rendered portraits, this time it's one of my favorite people ever, Conan!

Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



Entenzahn posted:

This is the tutorial in question

Thanks for the link

Re: brush sizes, for getting paint out of half pans, a size four is the largest practical size imo, but you could use that to transfer paint to a pallete then pull paint from the pallete with a larger one.

Also, if you're in the UK, I recommend joining the SAA (I think I can provide some sort of friend code if you're interested), they're not always the cheapest, but the things they are cheap on, they're very cheap, and they have a lot of video tutorials and live workshops and so on.

re: paper if you buy bigger sheets it works out cheaper, and you can cut them down to the size you actually want to work with.

Another thing to find out is what pigments your paints are made off - e.g. my Senellier Burnt sienna is a pure pigment - PBr 7 iirc, but the same colour name in the Arteza tubes is a mix of PR1010 and PBr6. They look approximately the same when unmixed, but behave slightly differently when mixing and so on, so if you try a colour mix and it doesn't work right, check your pigment numbers vs. the instructors.

Angrymog fucked around with this message at 06:48 on Apr 9, 2020

heavy liquid
Jan 3, 2008

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

sigma 6 posted:

These are amazing!

Thank you! I'm trying to draw more consistently, although it's not always a successful battle.
Sometimes it's just a sketch/doodle for the day, but it's something I guess.

heavy liquid fucked around with this message at 20:34 on Apr 9, 2020

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008





Started on the background of the latest crow friend. The reference photo background kind of sucks and i'm trying to figure out what to do with it. It's sitting on a cherry tree branch so i'm kind of experimenting with adding in some cherry blossoms and I might just cover the whole drat background in them.

Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



Paging Entenzan.

I started my project to try the same tutorial with different paints on different papers.


This is on Aldi multi-media paper, with Cotman (student grade), Sennelier (professional), and Kuretake (who the gently caress knows *) paints

The Aldi paper behaved much better than I thought it would - I honestly thought it was going to lift back to white the moment the second layer of water went on, and it dealt with being worked into quite well, all things considered. All sets were pan-based, and I suck at mixing greens. My Sennelier set doesn't have a yellow ochre (Pbr43), but has a Naples Yellow Deep (Pbr24), so I used that instead. I couldn't get a strong enough pigment mix with my greens (I suck at green) to do distinct trees, so just went for implied foliage. Like her I did the wind vane with a gel pen. Of the three paints, the Cotman didn't like being worked into over and over again; will be interesting to see if it does the same on better papers.

The aldi paper also tore quite badly when I pulled my masking tape off.

Also, everyone incase you haven't seen the notice in the chat thread or the daily doodles thread, we made a new art discord that will be actively maintained rather than just being part of weird discord empire.

https://discord.gg/25e2VpE

If you join, say your name in the lobby and you'll be given roles.

* Literally. I emailed and they don't have lightfastness and pigment ratings available to customers because their primary market isn't interested. They are however, very nice paints to use, and look gorgeous. They're also in huge shallow pans, so good for large brushes.

Torsten
Jun 14, 2019


im not that good but atleast i enjoy it.




Entenzahn
Nov 15, 2012

What will you say when
your child asks:
why did you fail Thunderdome?


Angrymog posted:

Paging Entenzan.

I started my project to try the same tutorial with different paints on different papers.


This is on Aldi multi-media paper, with Cotman (student grade), Sennelier (professional), and Kuretake (who the gently caress knows *) paints

The Aldi paper behaved much better than I thought it would - I honestly thought it was going to lift back to white the moment the second layer of water went on, and it dealt with being worked into quite well, all things considered. All sets were pan-based, and I suck at mixing greens. My Sennelier set doesn't have a yellow ochre (Pbr43), but has a Naples Yellow Deep (Pbr24), so I used that instead. I couldn't get a strong enough pigment mix with my greens (I suck at green) to do distinct trees, so just went for implied foliage. Like her I did the wind vane with a gel pen. Of the three paints, the Cotman didn't like being worked into over and over again; will be interesting to see if it does the same on better papers.

The aldi paper also tore quite badly when I pulled my masking tape off.

Also, everyone incase you haven't seen the notice in the chat thread or the daily doodles thread, we made a new art discord that will be actively maintained rather than just being part of weird discord empire.

https://discord.gg/25e2VpE

If you join, say your name in the lobby and you'll be given roles.

* Literally. I emailed and they don't have lightfastness and pigment ratings available to customers because their primary market isn't interested. They are however, very nice paints to use, and look gorgeous. They're also in huge shallow pans, so good for large brushes.

lol gently caress this is way better. you even used cheap paper too, guess I just need to practice more thanks for sharing

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Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



Entenzahn posted:

lol gently caress this is way better. you even used cheap paper too, guess I just need to practice more thanks for sharing

I did the pink sunset too (just Cotman and Sennelier, not with the Kuretakes), on Aldi, Bockingford (sort of equivalent to the paper you used), and Daler Rowney's Langton Prestige (100% cotton) and the mid-range paper came out the worst I think; even did one of them twice on it. Will post if you want.

ETA: Used a size 6 brush.

Angrymog fucked around with this message at 09:13 on Apr 15, 2020

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