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Hellbeard
Apr 8, 2002


Please report me if you see me post in GBS so a moderator may bulldoze my account like a palestinian school.


Another thing. Thumbed for nips.

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Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Speaking of ink, does anyone have any recommendations for a good inkwell? I like Speedball india ink, but the little plastic bottles are kind of flimsy and tend to leak.

Hipster Skeleton
May 1, 2005
UNAMAGA!

Bubbacub posted:

Speaking of ink, does anyone have any recommendations for a good inkwell? I like Speedball india ink, but the little plastic bottles are kind of flimsy and tend to leak.

I like FW Ink bottles. It's acryllic ink that comes in a glass bottle. http://www.dickblick.com/products/d...nt-artists-ink/ I've been reusing mine for years.

Also, Hello. I like making Traditional Art, but I'm a little more cartoony and illustrative. I did this like last week.



Hi.

Popcyan
Jun 5, 2012





This is a WIP commission, acrylics on box canvas, a wedding first dance picture. Deadline's coming up, I can't get it to come together, and this poo poo is beginning to haunt my dreams. I'm working off a bunch of different photographs for different elements, hence the messed-up light sources. There's obviously lots of little things in the picture I need to fix up - the dude's face and shirt for example - but the overall composition, light/dark balance and negative/positive space ratio seem all out of whack and I don't know what to do about it.

I'd really appreciate it if anyone has any advice at all on how I could salvage this, I'm at the point of just tearing it up and starting again.

Popcyan fucked around with this message at Jun 18, 2014 around 00:39

Carotid
Dec 18, 2008



Finally started taking formal watercolor classes, here's the result of class 1:



Hooray pear. I realized today that I have never painted a still life, and hoo boy you learn soooo much faster when you're painting what's in front of you. Can't wait to see how I progress over the next few weeks.

lumpanoodle
Jun 29, 2012



Various abstract geometric pieces I've made this year on sketch paper







Stroszek
Apr 3, 2007

Ceci n'est pas un paresseux


Popcyan posted:




This is a WIP commission, acrylics on box canvas, a wedding first dance picture. Deadline's coming up, I can't get it to come together, and this poo poo is beginning to haunt my dreams. I'm working off a bunch of different photographs for different elements, hence the messed-up light sources. There's obviously lots of little things in the picture I need to fix up - the dude's face and shirt for example - but the overall composition, light/dark balance and negative/positive space ratio seem all out of whack and I don't know what to do about it.

I'd really appreciate it if anyone has any advice at all on how I could salvage this, I'm at the point of just tearing it up and starting again.

The elbow on the man seems to be below his waistline; his arms seem disproportionately long for his body. The perspective on the man's pants suggests that you used a reference photo with the camera facing up at the couple from a lower angle. I think you may have overcompensated vertically on the figure for it.

The light is somewhat confusing, but why don't you, based on what you've done so far, think about what direction your main source of lighting should come from so that you'd only have to make minimal adjustments.

Maybe if the background were a lighter color, it wouldn't box in the very light colors you used for the figures - maybe try looking at that with photoshop adjustment layers first if you can.

lumpanoodle posted:

Various abstract geometric pieces I've made this year on sketch paper









In the 90s, this would have blown away the Lisa Frank/Trapper Keeper/binder design competition. I mean that in the best way.

Stroszek fucked around with this message at Jun 20, 2014 around 04:11

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Carotid posted:

Finally started taking formal watercolor classes, here's the result of class 1:



Hooray pear. I realized today that I have never painted a still life, and hoo boy you learn soooo much faster when you're painting what's in front of you. Can't wait to see how I progress over the next few weeks.

Yeah, isn't it fun? You'll use watercolors for years and the medium will still surprise you, but the initial jump from making smudgy blobs to having the control to render images is always exciting. You have a great start! Post more paintings as you go.

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



A couple more paintings I did this week. I think I may put down the palette knife for awhile.

IMG_0729 by philip painter, on Flickr

IMG_0724 by philip painter, on Flickr

neonnoodle
Mar 20, 2008

by exmarx


FYI you don't need to spoiler tag your NSFW images anymore. That was an insane policy from the arbitrary, despotic reign of the previous CC mod. LONG LIVE THE GLORIOUS NEW REGIME

the
Jul 18, 2004

by Cowcaster


How much should I sell paintings for?

Chip McFuck
Jul 24, 2007

NEXT LEVEL


I painted this little monster yesterday:

AltruisticNemesis
Nov 7, 2007
tra la la


the posted:

How much should I sell paintings for?

See I have this problem too. I looked at similar sizes on Etsy and they are going for $50+ so I decided on $50. Nothing is selling really though so either my art sucks or it's too expensive?

If you find the answer to this glorious riddle on pricing art please let me know cause I'm about to set fire to stuff out of frustration.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001





We had a 12 year old fencer model.

It was really funny watching people struggle to draw somebody under the age of 20, you really have to recalibrate your sense of proportion, especially in the face. The apparent ages in people's drawings varied from 15ish in mine to something like a 60 year old viking woman. People also had trouble drawing a slender frame underneath a bulky fencing suit, there were a couple of drawings that made her body look like a WH40K space marine.

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

Bubbacub posted:



We had a 12 year old fencer model.

It was really funny watching people struggle to draw somebody under the age of 20, you really have to recalibrate your sense of proportion, especially in the face. The apparent ages in people's drawings varied from 15ish in mine to something like a 60 year old viking woman. People also had trouble drawing a slender frame underneath a bulky fencing suit, there were a couple of drawings that made her body look like a WH40K space marine.

Everyone looks like a space marine in all the gear, even if you're only as big as a toothpick. So she was just wearing the knickers?

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Yeah, it was about 90 degrees in the studio. She was an excellent model for being so young.

the
Jul 18, 2004

by Cowcaster


AltruisticNemesis posted:

See I have this problem too. I looked at similar sizes on Etsy and they are going for $50+ so I decided on $50. Nothing is selling really though so either my art sucks or it's too expensive?

If you find the answer to this glorious riddle on pricing art please let me know cause I'm about to set fire to stuff out of frustration.

Art seems a lot like wine in my opinion.

You see two bottles of wine. One is priced for $1, and the other for $100. Which is higher quality? Of course, you assume the latter, because why would the first one be so cheap if it wasn't a worthless piece of poo poo?

Sometimes it's worth it to price art higher than you normally would, for the fact that the price gives it value. I just don't know what that price is supposed to be.

Carotid
Dec 18, 2008



Bubbacub posted:

Yeah, isn't it fun? You'll use watercolors for years and the medium will still surprise you, but the initial jump from making smudgy blobs to having the control to render images is always exciting. You have a great start! Post more paintings as you go.

Thank you! Yeah, I made a million smudgy blobs before I got the confidence to try painting actual things. Taking classes is really increasing my output; it's nice how class makes me want to practice what I learn on my own. I painted this still life on Monday:



And this still life was from my last class, where we were supposed to experiment with mixing grays:



I felt kind of stuck with this painting. I don't know if it's because the setup for the still life was a little too far from where I was sitting, but I had trouble judging value and shadow placement this time, on top of almost completely neglecting highlights. This, along with feeling lazy, resulted less of a real-life rendering of the still life than I would like. I'm going to practice fading out my edges more without scrubbing them to death.

Carotid fucked around with this message at Jun 26, 2014 around 05:31

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



neonnoodle posted:

FYI you don't need to spoiler tag your NSFW images anymore. That was an insane policy from the arbitrary, despotic reign of the previous CC mod. LONG LIVE THE GLORIOUS NEW REGIME

You still need to link and tag NSFW images as per general forum rules if a thread doesn't invoke the mystical [nws] in the thread title, though.

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



Humboldt Squid posted:

You still need to link and tag NSFW images as per general forum rules if a thread doesn't invoke the mystical [nws] in the thread title, though.
Like this thread does now! Post wieners and boobs to your heart's content.

Here's some recent drawings on toned paper




Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Carotid posted:

I painted this still life on Monday:


Nice rendering of highlights, and I like the bold colors. That's my problem with watercolors, I'm too timid with them and I want to build up value and saturation with lots of gradual layers. It sometimes works well, but sometimes I end up with bland, muddy mess.

Here are some 15 minute poses from the other day. Short poses are hard for me. If I have a couple of hours, I can push and pull at my sketch until it looks right, but getting it close enough in a couple of minutes and putting down the right marks to express the form is a skill I'm still working on.



Karma Comedian
Feb 2, 2012

Dr. E/N, PhD



parthenocarpy posted:

Really really happy with how this one came out -- another, larger Red Stripe bottle:



Anyone want one of these?

I absolutely love your stuff, especially your abstracts. How can I get one?

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



I was feeling pretty good about my figure drawing until the next session, where instead of a lean, bony, sinewy man, we had a 26 year old burlesque dancer modeling. I struggled with this for the whole session, I feel lost if I can't cue my proportions off of protruding ribs.

Billy Shears
Jul 9, 2009

I cut Paul's hair.

Bubbacub posted:

I was feeling pretty good about my figure drawing until the next session, where instead of a lean, bony, sinewy man, we had a 26 year old burlesque dancer modeling. I struggled with this for the whole session, I feel lost if I can't cue my proportions off of protruding ribs.



I have difficulties with sitting poses like this and tend to fail horribly. It's really tricky trying to keep them from looking "slouchy."

One thing that I find really useful is using box forms. With the box form you can tilt the top of the chest box back (the natural position). Following this tilt, the bottom end juts forward, which then allows you to really feel the bottom corners of the ribcage. I hope that makes sense.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Billy Shears posted:

I have difficulties with sitting poses like this and tend to fail horribly. It's really tricky trying to keep them from looking "slouchy."

One thing that I find really useful is using box forms. With the box form you can tilt the top of the chest box back (the natural position). Following this tilt, the bottom end juts forward, which then allows you to really feel the bottom corners of the ribcage. I hope that makes sense.

Yeah, I have Bridgeman's Life Drawing and that has some good examples. I've never really been able to use box forms successfully, though. I've been reading Anthony Apesos' book, which is like an anatomy book that teaches you only the parts of the body that matter for drawing. That seems to click with my brain better.

Here's what the instructor drew in the same amount of time:

Arthus
Nov 11, 2011

SansUnicorn

lumpanoodle posted:

Various abstract geometric pieces I've made this year on sketch paper







Really liking these, the halftoning really creates some depth. Biggest fan of the Art Deco one, but that's probably cause I'm just working on a similar project, those line contrasts work really well.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Hipster Skeleton posted:

I like FW Ink bottles. It's acryllic ink that comes in a glass bottle. http://www.dickblick.com/products/d...nt-artists-ink/ I've been reusing mine for years.

I think the best ink bottle I've found so far is one of those tiny size mason jars.

parthenocarpy
Dec 17, 2003



Wizard of Smart posted:

I absolutely love your stuff, especially your abstracts. How can I get one?

I can send you one for free if you want. All the of the Red Stripes are cursed though, every one of them has broken so far and they're the only ones that have done so. PM me with your address and whatever you'd like.

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



A painting I did in oil and pencil. I hope to use this technique on a new series.

Autechresaint
Jan 25, 2012


New pet portrait commission. First one in ~3 months. The dog recently passed away unfortunately.



I am currently working on another commission for a goon's two cats, it should be done by Monday.

lumpanoodle
Jun 29, 2012





made this on watercolor paper with microns, initially outlining in graphite. just uploaded to instagram, goon thoughts?

parthenocarpy
Dec 17, 2003





Carlton Banks Teller
Nov 17, 2004



Working on a triptych for a summer class and have my 1st and 3rd 6"x6" panels worked out:




Both from photos, both from using a grid for at least the base sketch. Center panel will be watercolor with colored pencil in browns. I'd love some tips for either; this is a color theory class so apart from random 1-on-1 time with the prof I'm riding blind. Though I have to say I'm pretty stoked with my watercolor, since this was my last attempt at painting back in January:

Autechresaint
Jan 25, 2012


Two cats. A commission for a fellow goon.

Carotid
Dec 18, 2008



Carlton Banks Teller posted:

Working on a triptych for a summer class and have my 1st and 3rd 6"x6" panels worked out:




Yeah, this is awesome.

Just finished my forth watercolor class, we did a standard still life in color:



I ran out of time before I could darken the shadows on the table, but overall I'm pretty pleased with it. I feel like I'm improving a lot on making things look more realistic.

Carotid fucked around with this message at Jul 9, 2014 around 04:57

seiferguy
Jun 9, 2005

FLAWED
INTUITION


Fun Shoe

So with zero practice and pretty much never attempting any sort of a serious painting since I was a kid (I'm 27 now) and fresh off a Bob Ross binge, I decided to buy an oil paint set and attempt an oil paint. I was actually pretty impressed with myself for a first-timer:



A couple of errors I knew afterward: first, I didn't mix the base paint coat of liquid white enough, which meant the paint was a little runny and caused for some issues blending it with other color. Second, it may have been made worse by error 1, but my knife work needs serious improvement (which is why the mountain looks not so great, and that apparent landslide was supposed to be a trail). I imagine a flat palette will go a long way to help that. My fan brush technique improved over the course of the painting which is why the trees look better as you go down the painting.

Any other thoughts? Also, is there a way to speed up the drying of this at the surface level? I painted this Monday and it's still a little wet to the touch.

smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



I'm just starting out with oil, but what I've learned so far...

Oils take a long time to dry, particularly if you lay them on thick. Some of my knife paintings take weeks to dry to the touch, and even then may take months before they set completely.

You can dilute paints with a bit of turpenoid and they will dry faster, but using too much turp can cause cracking. I usually use turp with my paint for initial washes and the underpainting. Other thinning mediums like linseed or safflower oil slow the drying time even more. I haven't noticed that cold wax affects drying time much either way.

Also some substrates are better at drying faster. I use Dick Blick's multimedia board for some of my paintings, which sets up the paint very quickly compared to canvas.

That said I don't paint like Bob Ross with a base layer of white for blending.

Here's a portrait I'm calling done before I overwork it. It's a bad pic, but you get the idea. I learn so much with each piece.

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



seiferguy posted:

So with zero practice and pretty much never attempting any sort of a serious painting since I was a kid (I'm 27 now) and fresh off a Bob Ross binge, I decided to buy an oil paint set and attempt an oil paint. I was actually pretty impressed with myself for a first-timer:



A couple of errors I knew afterward: first, I didn't mix the base paint coat of liquid white enough, which meant the paint was a little runny and caused for some issues blending it with other color. Second, it may have been made worse by error 1, but my knife work needs serious improvement (which is why the mountain looks not so great, and that apparent landslide was supposed to be a trail). I imagine a flat palette will go a long way to help that. My fan brush technique improved over the course of the painting which is why the trees look better as you go down the painting.

Any other thoughts? Also, is there a way to speed up the drying of this at the surface level? I painted this Monday and it's still a little wet to the touch.

Well it's definitely Bob Rossey for a first try, keep at it!
There's a tons of different mediums you can add to paint to change its drying time or just about any other aspect of it. Try mixing in a little alkyd medium next time - but honestly with oils taking a long time to dry is a good thing since it makes it easier to rework.

Carlton Banks Teller
Nov 17, 2004



Carotid posted:



I ran out of time before I could darken the shadows on the table, but overall I'm pretty pleased with it. I feel like I'm improving a lot on making things look more realistic.

Goddamn I love your depth of color.

I just finished this (although I already want to go back and change stuff, like the harsher highlights) and took some pics through the process. I'd love to see other peoples' progress shots if they take them; I feel like I learn more from that than almost anything right now.




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MeaningOfLife
Nov 30, 2001

<(I can tell you that it is NOT '42'.)


OK I haven't drawn for ages and I am doing a portrait of a friend for her birthday. I've been working on this for an hour and there's still something off about it. PM me so I can give you a link to the reference photo.



Edit: A friend of mine told me what needs to be fixed and I did it and I must say, it does look much better now:

MeaningOfLife fucked around with this message at Jul 18, 2014 around 05:08

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