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Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


Yay, a place where I fit in!

I graduated in 2012 with a BFA in Fibers. The only reason I say this is because I haven't made any artwork since. I'm burnt out or something. It's hard to not have a studio space.

This is from my senior thesis. It's one piece out of 5 and it's pretty small - it fits in the palm of your hand if you crumple it all up.



I originally wanted to do Printmaking and have a background in it, so finally I was able to take lithography and loved it. Too bad I can't do it at home





It's definitely not "traditional" in the sense that it's like portraiture or drawings but I'm pretty proud of all of it.

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Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


I have a dumb question for you traditionalists here. I can't seem to get over the fact that now that I've graduated from art school there's no point in making any work because it'll sit in my closet and nobody will even look at it or appreciate it. What do you do with all the work you make? The stuff nobody sees and sits in your tupperware under the bed. If galleries wont take it, where do you put it?

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


Seneschal posted:

I have an art studio I pay $300/month for. I don't even pretend that I'm going to break even with my work, but I still do paint a couple of days a week. If I was at home I'd convert to working smaller, on paper or uncradled board.
Also I'd keep posting my art on etsy and facebook, and make presents for everybody's birthday. Just because it hangs around doesn't mean it was a waste of your time.

Content:


Edited for GRAAAH PHONE INTERFACE HULK SMASH

Oh man, a studio would be a dream for me. I'm going to be moving next year and hope to have some more space to work. Right now there's not too much.

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


neonnoodle posted:

You might want to consider either liquid acrylic, or gouache. Liquid acrylic won't give you impasto peaks even at full concentration. Gouache is as flat as it gets. There's also Acryla Gouache, which I've never used but supposedly it's got the texture of gouache but it doesn't reactivate after it dries.

I use Acryla Gouache and absolutely love it. I initially bought it because it was a bit cheaper than regular gouache and I've never had any problems with it.

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


Does anyone here have experience with monoprinting and dry point? I want to get back into making prints but I have to use whatever is safe and available at home (no more nice presses and spray boxes for me ). I saw some people discussing plexiglass dry point which seemed pretty rad, and then I was thinking of doing some painting directly onto glass.

I have experience with screen printing and lithography, but I got some Q's:

I don't recall ever soaking my paper for lithography, but it looks like you have to for dry point, right?

As far as inks go, is there some type I'm supposed to use? I remember we had some pretty thick inks for lithography and we would add a solvent to it to make it thinner, but gently caress if I remember what it was. For screenprinting I mostly used textile pigments and thickened dyes, so thats not much help. Can I use regular acrylics or gouache or something?

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


dupersaurus posted:

I haven't done monoprinting but I'd imagine plain old acrylics might dry too fast on you unadulterated (although there are extenders, right?) But, yeah, any intaglio process needs damp paper to help suck the ink out of the grooves.

I didn't even think of drying time. I have oils somewhere, and I love them but they're truly a pain in the butt, especially in my tiny apartment. I'll just suck it up and get some ink.

Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


Speaking of oils - what's the consensus on oil painting inside of an apartment? I live in a very small apartment but I miss my oil paints so much. I switched to gouache in college and it was OK for a while but I love the flexibility of oils. I guess theoretically I could just go and paint outside on nice days.

How's the fume situation typically? I remember being lightheaded after 5 hours in the oil painting studio and that room wasn't very big.

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Shnooks
Mar 24, 2007

I'M BEING BORN D:


I usually use turpenoid to thin out the paints while I'm painting anyways. I guess I can try some acrylics. They have all sorts of mediums to extend the paints, right? It's been a long time since I've used acrylic.

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